Why do so many people insist that LPN'S AREN'T REAL NURSES!!?? - page 2

I mean, the title does have "Nurse" in it.So why are so many people insisting that LPN's arent real nurses? When I go to the hospital, I see these people giving medication , care, comfort and other... Read More

  1. by   Euskadi1946
    I have nothing but praise for the LPNS who showed me their skills in clinicals during nursing school and the ones who worked side by side with me in the hospital. They are an extremely vital part of the team as are the CNAS. I have learned a great deal from LPNS and CNAS and if that is their choice not to get their RN than so be it!!!
  2. by   Tweety
    There are a few trolls out there, and there are some people that truly don't understand what the different roles are. However, I don't see, at least around here any widespread confusion that LPNs aren't nurses. Not to say it doesn't happen, but it's infrequent enough not to bother anyone.
  3. by   nursejoelle
    I have encounted this constantly since moving to Michigan a few months ago. In Virginia Bch, I was an Urgent Care nurse and I was a respeceted professional...in Michigan, no one is interested in hiring an LPN except a Nursing Home, and maybe a few hospitals that aren't in my area or that I have not come upon yet. The local colleges still offer the LPN courses, I wonder why? I am looking for a job and feel so discouraged and feel like "less than a nurse". I have never felt this way before, and have been an LPN for 8 years. Another thing to think about...All we hear about is that we are in a dire nursing shortage...if this is so true, why is it so difficult to get into an RN program? The schools have a ton of applicants and accept only a few hundred (at best) and the competition is so tough, I am told that here in Michigan, you have to have a 4.0 to get in. Just a thought that I wanted to throw out there. Have a great night!
  4. by   grace90
    Quote from nursejoelle

    in Michigan, no one is interested in hiring an LPN except a Nursing Home, and maybe a few hospitals that aren't in my area or that I have not come upon yet.

    The schools have a ton of applicants and accept only a few hundred (at best) and the competition is so tough, I am told that here in Michigan, you have to have a 4.0 to get in. Just a thought that I wanted to throw out there. Have a great night!

    nursejoelle- look at my profile and PM me if you want to talk- I'm in Michigan (and no, when I got into nursing school I didn't and never will have a 4.0), we may have the highest unemployment rate in the nation but we do have some decent nursing schools, oh yeah, and welcome to our beautiful state!
  5. by   DusktilDawn
    I was an RPN/LPN for 10 years in Canada, darn proud of it too and darn proud to be a nurse for the last 15 years.

    I will comment that when I worked as an RPN, most of the general public did not understand that there was a distinction between the two, and that both ARE nurses. The worst type of snobbery (the not the real nurse kind) I encountered as an RPN actually came from the unit managers and nursing administrators at the facility I was employed at. The vast majority of RNs I worked with DID respect RPN, which was amazing considering the lousy attitude displayed from management at that facility, of course there were one or two bad apples here and there that followed their lead.

    I obtained my education for both RPN and RN at the same college, and I know the instructions did not teach teach the RNs to look down on RPNs. That did not stop some classmates from being snobby towards RPNs, however most of their comments came from ignorance about the RPN role. BTW I usually did take the opportunity to educate when such comments were made.

    There always seems to be someone somewhere that has to put down others because of their own inadequacies, if it isn't sneering at the letters after your name, guaranteed it will be something else they'd find to look down their noses at.
    Last edit by DusktilDawn on Sep 12, '06
  6. by   moongirl
    before I went to school to become an RN- I did not know the difference between Rn or LPN, was just always grateful to the NURSE on duty that took care of me or my family.
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Commonwealth of Virginia says i'm a nurse.

    My name badge says i'm a nurse

    Therefore, i say i am a nurse.


    Anyone who has a problem with that, take it to the state board, not me.
  8. by   Brita01
    Quote from DusktilDawn
    There always seems to be someone somewhere that has to put down others because of their own inadequacies, if it isn't sneering at the letters after your name, guaranteed it will be something else they'd find to look down their noses at.

    Yep.
  9. by   TheCommuter
    I truly feel sorry for the persons who feel the undying urge to insult another individual's choice of educational attainment. Nurses are not well-respected because the world can see that we do not respect each other very much.

    We will not receive much-deserved respect from others until we're all able to respect ourselves and each other first and foremost.

    I am not going to become involved in the petty LPN/LVN versus RN debate because I know I'm a nurse and no one will tell me otherwise.
  10. by   nursecave
    I was an LPN for 6 years, and have been an RN for 3 months. I went back for the money. I am 27 years old, and over a career the difference in money would really add up. As far as the education, I really didn't learn anything I didn't already know when I went back to school to get my RN. I have no problem with those who choose not to go back. You have to do what is right for you. I am/was a respected LPN who was frequently sought after for my advice on multiple occassions. I rarely felt less of a nurse than the RN's, and often find myself still signing as an LPN or referring to myself as an LPN. The best nurses I work with are LPN's, or are RN's who started as LPN's. I always hated it when patients asked what the difference was in an RN and an LPN, and then 1/2 the time they didn't act like they wanted you back because you were inferior. A nurse is a nurse is a nurse........no matter what credentials are behind their name.
  11. by   mtnmom
    I have the utmost respect for LPN's. Most all that I have ever worked with really know their stuff, and can "run circles around" a lot of RNs.
  12. by   scribblerpnp
    I have a Masters degree in nursing and was working in an RN role as a charge nurse in psych for the first time ever (psych nursing isn't really given much time in RN or MSN programs- you get the very basics and that's it) and with a wonderful LPN who taught me how to be a great psych nurse. I couldn't have done it if it weren't for her advise and sharing of knowledge and experience. Early on in that job , I felt like she was the "real nurse," and I was the one trying to hang on to dear life! LPN, RN, MSN, we are all nurses! And we need to work and stick together. I'm always willing to learn something new to me from whoever knows more (and sometimes that learnin' comes from my nursing students- and I think it's great!)
  13. by   lindarn
    Quote from scribblerrn
    I have a Masters degree in nursing and was working in an RN role as a charge nurse in psych for the first time ever (psych nursing isn't really given much time in RN or MSN programs- you get the very basics and that's it) and with a wonderful LPN who taught me how to be a great psych nurse. I couldn't have done it if it weren't for her advise and sharing of knowledge and experience. Early on in that job , I felt like she was the "real nurse," and I was the one trying to hang on to dear life! LPN, RN, MSN, we are all nurses! And we need to work and stick together. I'm always willing to learn something new to me from whoever knows more (and sometimes that learnin' comes from my nursing students- and I think it's great!)
    While I have worked with many fine LPNs, and as I have stated in many other threads, I think that the time of LPNs/LVNs has come and gone. That is why so many hospitals across the country are phasing them out.

    Do you realize that you have less education than Physical Therapy Assistants? Whose claim to fame is walking patients around the unit, or exercising their legs and arms? What is wrong with this picture? Their educational entry into practice is a associates degree, while LPNs and LVNs have only a 9 month program. That is probably where their credibility with the public gets questioned. and probably why many RNs, including me, don't want to be responsible for their patient load, as well as my own. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington

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