Does anyone regret becoming an LPN?

  1. Please be honest. I know this is blunt, and some will get upset. And I also know some may not want to admit because there are others here who already look down on our profession. But are there times when you regret the choice that you made to become an LPN? Just a question.
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  2. 40 Comments

  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    No, but the decision was made for me. The program I entered requires that first year students pass the NCLEX-PN to go on the the rN year.

    I am working as an LPN while continuing on-line for the rN. I knew that I would not be satisfied with the limited scope of practice and opportunities of the LPN, but it serves to hone my clinical skills while allowing me to earn money and gain decent benefits, both of which are important to my husband and me.

    I know a lot of LPN's who are quite contented with it and have no desire to advance their licensing level. And that's fine - they are competent, good nurses who serve a vital function on the floor.
  4. by   linzz
    I feel the same way as suesquatch. I also start my RN this fall if all goes well. I too, am tired of being limited to only certain practice areas, however I do like LTC but it is very difficult if not impossible to find an LTC with decent work conditions. Just my opinion.
  5. by   LPMRN
    No, I do not regret becoming an LPN. I do regret not doing it sooner. It is very rewarding. It sure does beat the factory job I had for 10 years.
  6. by   feisty_lpn
    I do regret becoming an LPN to an extent. In Ohio, our scope of practice is very limited. We're basically only utilized in LTC, ALF, and doctor's offices. Very few hospital positions are available to us. Now with the intraduction (sp?) of Medication Aides here, we're slowly becoming obsolete. Its cheaper to have one LPN oversee a facility full of MAs than it is have an LPN in each unit.

    I can't wait to get my RN. Hopefully, I'll get to start that this summer.
  7. by   Jules A
    I got my LPN because I wasn't sure if I would like nursing and figured I could get through 3 semesters of most anything. So its a double edge sword because now I'm really frustrated with trying to find a bridge program but on the other hand knowing what I knew at the time getting my LPN was the right choice for me. If only foresight was 20/20 like hindsight, lol.
  8. by   Jessalou
    Quote from wefdm21
    Please be honest. I know this is blunt, and some will get upset. And I also know some may not want to admit because there are others here who already look down on our profession. But are there times when you regret the choice that you made to become an LPN? Just a question.
    I am a new LPN. I do regret my decision sometimes....I work as a float for several clinics and sometimes feel extremely overwhelmed and doubt my abilities to be a good nurse. I just have to remember to tell myself that I am new to this and it comes easier to everyone as they gather new experiences.
  9. by   moodychick
    I hate to say it; but, I also regret not getting my RN many years ago. I am going to school now on-line and it's very hard to get back in the school mold. I can see the writing on the wall here in Ohio and it's not pretty. I never heard of medication aides; this is very worrisome not only for LPN's but for the patients as well. I've had 3 courses in pharmacology in my career! How much pharmacology are the med aides going to get!!! Only time will tell. I do wish circumstances had been different for me and I could have done this additional schooling instead of getting my LPN or at least had been able to go back to school soon after I had started working as an LPN.
  10. by   traumaRUs
    When I became an LPN in 1992, I knew that RN was the goal, so kept going right into the ADN program. No -I don't regret it at all. However, for what I wanted to do, hospital nursing, I needed an RN.
  11. by   MsLady06
    No way!
  12. by   TheCommuter
    I don't regret earning my LVN license. In fact, I wish I had earned my LVN license right out of high school. It has enabled me to have a career with a sense of fulfillment, a stable income, flexible scheduling, and advancement opportunities.

    I am in the process of pursuing my RN license because of the increased pay, higher educational level, and broadened opportunities.
  13. by   wefdm21
    Quote from moodychick
    I hate to say it; but, I also regret not getting my RN many years ago. I am going to school now on-line and it's very hard to get back in the school mold. I can see the writing on the wall here in Ohio and it's not pretty. I never heard of medication aides; this is very worrisome not only for LPN's but for the patients as well. I've had 3 courses in pharmacology in my career! How much pharmacology are the med aides going to get!!! Only time will tell. I do wish circumstances had been different for me and I could have done this additional schooling instead of getting my LPN or at least had been able to go back to school soon after I had started working as an LPN.
    Moodychick.. your post is the reason why I posed the question. The picture isn't very pretty here either as far as opportunities go. And like you traumaRN, I prefer to work in a hospital. So I've been in school for two years to become an LPN, graduated, passed the NCLEX, and am now having the hardest time finding a fulltime job. Now I'm back in school for another 3 years hoping to not be put on someones waiting list! I'm just having a hard time with this. I know you all may not be in the same boat.
  14. by   pagandeva2000
    I have only been an LPN since June, 2006; however, thus far, I do not regret it. I do get annoyed when the famous questions "When are you going for your RN" comes into play, however, I always knew that I had no intention of taking on RN responsibility. It is almost as though the perception is that if you are not an RN, you are perceived to be without ambition or in short, useless. I don't really care what other think of my personal life decisions, anyway. Since I am only interested in practicing basic nursing, the limitations do not bother me....(here in New York, there don't seem to be many limitations, per se). I get annoyed with an RN tries to dump on me, because I see that the ones that I've encountered are very overwhelmed. My personal feeling is that as adults, we are responsible for knowing what we are getting into. The LPN be constricting for some and rewarding for others, the RN may have a vast amount of opportunities but may be burdensome; but BOTH...LPN and RN must also accept the responsibility of all that our titles entail. We also have options to change our situations if we are really determined to do so. More options are available...examples are the on line courses, etc...

    Bottom line is try and not let other people define who you are and what you can do. You can certainly become an RN with determination. Believe in yourself in the meantime and have faith that what you need can be brought to you at the right time.

    Personally, I plan to expand within this scope, with courses such as dialysis, IV and wound certifications, etc... (primarily for mobility and becoming more marketable) but, RN is not in my field of vision because it equates too many headaches for me as an individual. What I think is that while you are feeling this way, observe your options to move up...investigate the on line courses, begin studying again independently while you are searching. Nursing periodicals have updated information all the time, and you would be surprized of the right article to help you understand a process and may be able to recall that needed piece of information when you enter into an RN program. I think that Excelsior offers tutoring. I have a friend that does it, and she told me she is very pleased with it.
    Last edit by pagandeva2000 on Jan 11, '07

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