Any Lpn's that would never become a RN? - page 4

Just curious if there are any LPN's that have no intention on becoming a RN? If so why not?... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I currently earn $19 hourly as an LVN at a SNF with a little less than 2 years of LTC experience. New grad RNs at the major hospitals in my area are started off at between $19 to $22 hourly (depending on the institution), so some start off earning as much as me, while some earn a couple more bucks per hour than me. At this point, pursuing the RN licensure seems pointless at times, because I am in it for the money.

    However, I still want the RN license because of the pay increase. I also applaud those of you who are pleased and content with your LPN/LVN licensure. To each his own, and to each her own.
    I'd cheer for you, no matter what! You seem to be a very intelligent person who has much to offer the profession as well as those on this forum.:spin:
  2. by   pagandeva2000
    And, also, Commuter, you will probably have more opportunities. I hear that LPNs are limited in opportunities in many other places, so, if you have the desire and will to do it, then go for the gusto!
  3. by   softstorms
    I have been an LPN for 20 years or so. I earned that title in my mid 30's after being an aide for 10 years. I have been staff nurse, med nurse, unit manager, staff coordinator and supervisor of many things during that time. I have worked in Dr's offices and hospitals and now work in acute/rehab. I make a good living from my wages and have no thoughts of upping myself to R.N. I have found that even with this title I have many options to choose from. Now if I go back to school, it will be to learn more about my personal interests. I often go to classes to learn about specialties...Hiv..Alzhimiers....Dementia...Drug abuse. This does not get me a new title, but it makes me a better nurse. We are all apart of the team and all have our place in it. Make your choice based on were you want to be and not were you think you should be.
  4. by   SAHMU4IA
    Quote from softstorms
    I often go to classes to learn about specialties...Hiv..Alzhimiers....Dementia...Drug abuse. This does not get me a new title, but it makes me a better nurse. We are all apart of the team and all have our place in it. Make your choice based on were you want to be and not were you think you should be.
    This is key. You reaffirm my decision..:angel2:
  5. by   Mycherry05
    Quote from kgard7777
    Just curious if there are any LPN's that have no intention on becoming a RN? If so why not?
    I want to go back, but it never seems like the right time. If I did, I would still want to work the floor, not be a manager. I am mainly after the title.
  6. by   peridotgirl
    I'm NOT an LPN as of yet. But yes, I do plan to become an RN..:spin:
  7. by   Trophywife81
    I realize this thread is a bit old by now, but I just wanted to say how encouraging I found it. Nursing is a second career for me, and I have a previous Bachelor's degree in another area. Before starting LVN school, I was very keen on earning RN licensure and perhaps become a NP. Now I have one semester left in LVN school, and after being in higher education for five years, I've realized that I think I'm done after completing LVN training. I decided to become a nurse for the job stability, the variety of opportunies, the relatively decent pay, and for the "human service" factor that I enjoy. Becoming an RN does not increase any of those factors for me, except for $ (and an extra $4-5 an hour is NOT incentive enough for me to spend even more time in school). Additionally, I see RNs involved with so much more paperwork, politics, and responsibility--and I prefer to keep those things to a minimum So for now, at least, it's LVN for me; and despite all the expectations of others for me to advance my nursing education (I have a 4.0 GPA), I know that becoming an RN is not going to provide me with any more satisfaction than being "just" an LVN.

    This got longer than I had planned. Anyway, thanks for this interesting thread!
  8. by   labvampire
    I used to think that I have to achieve my RN. I am not so sure now. I work in the Emergency Room at my hospital, one of the very few that allow us. I am my RN's right arm. I do everything but push IV meds and when there is a code blue I am right in there with them drawing up meds, bagging, assessing, etc. I can do all of those things that free up the RN who is stuck with all that paperwork I do not have to do. RN means paperwork, not patient care. I can give that exclusively. My doctors trust my assessment, I report to them, they give me orders, I carry them out. If I am not sure about something my RN or Doctor takes me in the room and teaches me right there on the spot. They are great and I am very lucky. I am very proud of my status and sign my title with pride. I worked hard to get here. Nursing school was harder on us than the RN's. Be Proud!
  9. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from jmking
    I am currently in the process to apply to an rn program. If I don't get in, I will try again. I do hate the fact that you have to jump through hoops to get into nursing school. I am expecting the same crap again. At some point, when do you give up? After all I am a nurse.
    Oh yes- it's the same crap again, only a lot more of it, and more in-depth.
  10. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from labvampire
    Nursing school was harder on us than the RN's. Be Proud!
    I don't care for that statement at all. What makes you say that?
  11. by   labvampire
    You do not have to like the statement, but it speaks the truth. We were treated as lower class citizens, an after thought. Not only by the RN students, the faculty. They had one clinical day, we had two, they had paperwork we had more. It's as though we had to prove ourselves twice as hard because we weren't in the RN program. Ask any of the 30 of us who attended the LPN program at Illinois Central College. None of us have any desire to go back and bridge after that hell. At least not at that facility.
  12. by   Valerie Salva
    Well, that was your experience. I was an LPN for several years before I became an RN. My RN program instructors were much harder on students that the LPN ones were. We had more than twice the clinical hours, and about 5 or six times as much paperwork. Also, we had the responsibilty of supervising LPN students in clinicals, and were held responsible for their actions.
  13. by   labvampire
    Everyone's experience was different. But you almost sound resentful you were in charge of those LPN's students in clinicals. If anything, being an LPN first would have made you a little more compassionate. If you didn't want the responsibility, you shouldn't have bridged over to RN. They are ultimately the individual's that are responsible. You defend your RN title and I will defend my LPN title. We all are in it for the same reason, to care for people and make their experience with medical issues a little more bearable. There will always be a pissing contest between the two professions. I respect the RN's for their knowledge and expertise. I just expect the same respect for my scope of practice. I may bridge one day myself, I am of leadership quality and enjoy delegating and making things flow smooth. I like teaching the non-confident individuals. I expect alot more responsibility and I know I can handle it. I will remain respectful of those who work for me as I do now. So, I apologize for any wording that may have been misconstrued.

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