What are Nursing Courses REALLY like?

  1. I am only in pre-nursing at the moment getting all my pre-reqs out of the way.

    Have read descriptions of all the nursing courses an am intrigued as to what they are really like? MAny thanks!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   purplemania
    they are hard and require lots of studying outside of class. Approximately half of the students will drop out before graduation because the classes require so much time. You will have to be self-motivated and be able to maintain a positive attitude, just like when you are working as a nurse. There is a lot of emphasis on math and the sciences. I recommend a study group of classmates who are interested in passing as opposed to talking about boyfriends or ordering pizza. Nursing school ain't for sissys.
  4. by   nycNurse2b
    you responded to my other post, too! thanks!

    i fully understand that nursing courses are hard. and you must be dedicated and 100% devoted. i guess what i am trying to comprehend is what are the classes really like? and what are they all about? the course descriptions are soooooo vague. you cannot get a sense for what the classes really entail.



    for example,



    nure 131 nursing i

    nursing 131 is an introductory course designed to establish the foundations of knowledge, attitudes and perceptual motor skills necessary for beginning practice. theoretical nursing concepts and related skills will emphasize universal requisites. the basic needs of man across the life span will be the organizational framework of the course. the role of the nurse in the multi-cultural health care delivery system will focus on nursing care for selected health problems. commonly seen health deviations within the adult population will be introduced. subsequent nursing courses build and expand on the foundational concepts and skills presented in this course. students participate in clinical experiences in the skills lab and acute and convalescent care settings for application of fundamental nursing principles. 4 hours theory, 12 hours clinical per week. 8 credits.

    pre-requisites: nure 130, bio 105, eng 101, che 105 (or che 113). g.p.a. of 2.0.
  5. by   Nurse2bSandy
    this sounds like my fundamentals class... real basics covered. some nursing skills taught, as well as very limited pathophys as to why nurses do stuff. you will learn how to document and probably how to develop a care plan. what you learn in class you will practice in your lab/hospital setting.
    each time i read through these descriptions they sound so reasonable... i get the confidence to do the class. then i get into the class and realize how involved they are. my class tested such teensy details... like what sublingual pocket to put the thermometer into... i didn't even realize there were "pockets". you will know so much when you are done... and it will just build from there!
    good luck!


    nure 131 nursing i

    nursing 131 is an introductory course designed to establish the foundations of knowledge, attitudes and perceptual motor skills necessary for beginning practice. theoretical nursing concepts and related skills will emphasize universal requisites. the basic needs of man across the life span will be the organizational framework of the course. the role of the nurse in the multi-cultural health care delivery system will focus on nursing care for selected health problems. commonly seen health deviations within the adult population will be introduced. subsequent nursing courses build and expand on the foundational concepts and skills presented in this course. students participate in clinical experiences in the skills lab and acute and convalescent care settings for application of fundamental nursing principles. 4 hours theory, 12 hours clinical per week. 8 credits.

    pre-requisites: nure 130, bio 105, eng 101, che 105 (or che 113). g.p.a. of 2.0. [/quote]
  6. by   enfermeraSG
    I'm wondering the same thing....I start in August and am getting anxious. What is it that is most difficult - the material itself, or the workload? Is it finding time to cram in all you need to know, or is the material really hard to grasp? SG

    ........i hope no one says both!!!
  7. by   twarlik
    Quote from enfermeraSG
    I'm wondering the same thing....I start in August and am getting anxious. What is it that is most difficult - the material itself, or the workload? Is it finding time to cram in all you need to know, or is the material really hard to grasp? SG

    ........i hope no one says both!!!
    I personally find it most challenging to manage the amount of work. The material is not really that difficult to understand, it's just that you have so much to learn in a short period of time.
    My advice...Don't stress! You can do it. Nursing school isn't exactly rocket science, but it is challenging. As long as you stay on top of the reading and manage your time well, then you will do fine!
    Good luck.
  8. by   HyperRNRachel
    I think once you get over the initial nervousness the classes are not much different than any other college class. Yes, there is more information, more study time needed, and you do have to be self motivated, but the classes are not that difficult. I believe the difficulty some people feel is actually the anxiety about finishing the courses with a degree and starting a career.
  9. by   wonderbee
    Fundamentals touches on a brief history of nursing and its theories/theorists; an overview of the profession and professional responsibilities, communication with patients and staff, intro to assessment techniques and pathophysiology. The lecture will also compliment your skills sessions where you learn the hands-on techniques that you will practice on real patients in the hospital setting during your clinical rotation.
  10. by   NurseyBaby'05
    The Nursing classes are hard, but they're really interesting. There is no way to memorize everything. The tests are a toss up between in depth thought and common sense. I was more nervous before my first test than I was before any of my finals. When I would ask someone what the tests were like, I would get the following response:"There's just no way to explain a Nursing test!" Thanks a lot! Once I got that first test under my belt and did decently, it wasn't so bad. It's also a little nerve wracking when you get a new instructor. Everyone tests differently.Overall, I would say that my first semester was the hardest. It was purely psychological though. I was not used to thinking like a Nurse. I hadn't been in school for ten years. I was completely broke and I was taking two extra prereq's along with my Nursing. The content has gotten a lot more complex, but does not seem as hard. I guess I've adjusted. (Now that I'm almost done! ) Hang in there and break everything down into smaller tasks and it will go fast!
  11. by   abundantjoy07
    [color=dimgray]at the nursing school i'm going to we had to take pathophysiology as a prerequisite course. i personally enjoyed every minute of it and thought it was great. is patho a pre-req for everyone? and if so...i'm guessing the patho course is nothing compared to "the real thing" (meaning nursing school itself).
  12. by   wannabemw
    Quote from babyrn_06
    [color=dimgray]at the nursing school i'm going to we had to take pathophysiology as a prerequisite course. i personally enjoyed every minute of it and thought it was great. is patho a pre-req for everyone? and if so...i'm guessing the patho course is nothing compared to "the real thing" (meaning nursing school itself).
    how did you do this? i took patho twice and still only managed to pull a "d" (dif school, dif state). i live in fear of having to take it again this fall or spring (at least this time it will be w/pharm and over 2 semesters) (i did well in pharm w/a "b",so i dunno if i will have 2 re-take it. i figure it can't hurt, after all it was 2y ago that i had it). i enjoyed path and had 2 prof, dif semesters, even had a tutor, and still couldn't pass! (i even got the patho made easy book which i loved btw!) i figured i could ace it the next time...that was until i saw the same book is being used @ this school!
    hints? suggestions?
    hope i get a good prof!
  13. by   Indy
    The nursing fundamentals course we had spent some time reviewing nursing theorists, a really brief history of nursing and nursing education, and systems theory, with emphasis on the Neuman model. We had classes on physical assessment, nutrition, fluid and electrolyte balance, respiratory problems, elimination, nursing diagnoses and care planning. Labs involved vital signs, sterile dressing changes, handwashing, bed baths, making occupied beds, etc.

    One thing we've all discovered about nursing classes is that the syllabus or some part of your paperwork will have assigned reading in it for the course. Test questions from any part of that are fair game, and there is no way to cover it all in class.
  14. by   mitchsmom
    About the tests, I would say that most of mine from actual NUR classes are NCLEX style, these would give you a good idea:
    http://www.nclexinfo.com/nclex_practice1-10.htm

    We have to do a fair amount of papers, too. We seem to have at least two 5,10,15 page papers per class per semester plus maybe a couple of smaller ones. For example, for pharm we had to do a drug analysis where we had to find someone 65+, on at least 3 drugs and one herbal supplement, write up their history, all about the drugs and how they might interact and how they apply to that person, etc. An example from assessment, we kept notes from each weekly assessment (each week was a different system: taking vitals, heart, resp, abdominal, nervous, etc.) on our lab partners and at the end we wrote up a big history on them. For a rural/cultural class we had to do a cultural assessment.

    Patho is like the physiology part of A&P but evaluates what is going on when there is a disorder. What is happening in the body when you are diabetic? What is happening with metabolic acidosis? Multiple sclerosis? etc.

    There's more but those are just some examples

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