Is Your Name Important? - page 3

by TheCommuter 15,076 Views | 84 Comments Senior Moderator

For starters, I will reveal that I am an African-American female with a very common anglicized first and last name. I am also friendly with a small handful of nurse managers, staff development personnel, and others who have at... Read More


  1. 0
    I would agree that names may affect a candidate's application, dependent on the bias of the hiring manager. My name also would not reveal that I am biracial, which in my opinion, shouldn't matter one way or another. Interesting article.
  2. 0
    Good article. I think it is incumbent on parents to give a good first name to their children. Obviously the last name usually isn't changed. But intentionally giving a "creative" first name that results in a lifetime's worth of headache is not good parenting. A name should be easy to use, and with a little thought it can be more individual than a common name.
  3. 0
    I wonder if my name has had an effect on my career. I have a uniquely spelled name. People usually mispronounce and spell it. I didn't really consider until recently that it could be considered an "ethnic" name. I wonder if I spelled it a more common way if my job prospects would change. Something to think about, I guess.
  4. 1
    My parents did me a great favor by giving me a traditional, rather patrician name. It certainly hasn't hurt me. We did our children similar a kindness. No one will ever misspell or mispronounce it, or take them for the wrong gender. They will not be bullied or mocked due to their name. They will probably be the only one in their class, but not definitely. Simple, classic, elegant, straight forward. Not the least bit "trendeigh."
    Tina, RN likes this.
  5. 1
    I changed my name legally recently. I know what you mean. I changed an ethnic name to a very blank simple Western name. First and last. My new name bears no trace of my birth name. I like it. I feel so Marilyn Monroe. And I think it's brought me luck.

    Maybe I'll end up a movie star instead of a nurse...
    echoRNC711 likes this.
  6. 0
    My name is somewhat traditional and a simple spelling, yet it is commonly misspelled (lots of extra letters added) and mispronounced. Amazing since it's 4 letters and 2 sylables.

    My son's name is one syllable, 4 letters and is occasionally misspelled (hockey fans perfer the French version) or they change his name to a longer version when his name is stand alone. It's not like I named him Mike and people call him Michael.

    My brother & his wife (a femininzed masculine name) did a huge disservice to their 3 daughters, two have traditionally male first names/spellings (now more non gender specific but still have the masculine spelling) with "typical" middle names. His youngest daughter has an atypical first name and a normal middle name with a bizarro spelling (NO ONE can pronounce the poor kid's middle name).

    Sure it's great to be unique but really what are some people thinking (like my sister in law). I was sitting in a PTO meeting a couple of years ago, and we were preparing a list of boys & girls (different fliers were sent home as the sponsored event was gender relevant, I don't recall the event) but we couldn't guess what gender half the kindergarten class was based upon their names. It was rather frustrating.
  7. 0
    The article is unfortunately true. I have interviewed many many nurses and have had to ask them to pronounce their names for me. I have hired those with difficult names and some of my peers want to know what in the world I was thinking!
    As a manager, we have to be cognizant of federal laws r/t hiring practices. I can honestly say, I've never not hired someone because of their name.
    My name is one of those names that can be shortened, and believe me, even when I introduce myself by my given name, people take the liberty to shorten it. Its annoying, so I can relate to those with difficult names.
    A name does not define who you are or how you will practice.
  8. 0
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    My parents did me a great favor by giving me a traditional, rather patrician name. It certainly hasn't hurt me. We did our children similar a kindness. No one will ever misspell or mispronounce it, or take them for the wrong gender. They will not be bullied or mocked due to their name. They will probably be the only one in their class, but not definitely. Simple, classic, elegant, straight forward. Not the least bit "trendeigh."
    This is what I was considering when I named my children. My daughter has always been the only Corinne in her grade, but she has a "real" name that is classic and feminine and truly fits her. I was one of probably a dozen Christina/Christy/Kristin/Krystals when I was a child.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  9. 0
    Okay, on the name note: I need objective advice, which I know friends and family won't give me since they just want to be supportive of a name I picked.

    Is it okay to name your child what would normally be a nick-name? I'm not pregnant yet, but I do have my heart set on a particular name since it's a name in the family, and I could always be sentimental and remember this person after she's long gone , but I don't like her full name, so I wanted to name my future daughter the nick-name version of it. I really really like it...but would she not be taken seriously? One of my friends has a nick name as her formal name, and it works well.

    Great thread by the way.
  10. 0
    Quote from meatballgirl
    I changed my name legally recently. I know what you mean. I changed an ethnic name to a very blank simple Western name. First and last. My new name bears no trace of my birth name. I like it. I feel so Marilyn Monroe. And I think it's brought me luck.

    Maybe I'll end up a movie star instead of a nurse...
    Was it very difficult changing your name? I HATE my first name. It makes me cringe when I hear it called. I'm a float nurse so I battle with pronunciation every time I work. Even when I say just call me by my nickname people still ask about my given name. It doesn't matter don't call me that because you will mispronounce it. I want to legally change my first name to my nickname.


Top