Where can I get male only patients?

  1. Im a male CNA and I've worked In a facility where males were not even allowed to have female residents. If there were females in the assignment they would swap them for a male with a female CNA.

    I've recently joined another facility and I don't think it's the same.
    For religious reasons I cannot do females.

    I cannot understand how, in a non life/death situation, where a male and female CNA is available, a male CNA is changing/toileting, cleaning and dressing a woman, while on the other side of the curtain, a woman is doing the same for a man. Thats crazy and there's no explanation for this.

    Does anyone know any facilities in NYC or queens where they don't give male CNA's females?
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  2. 67 Comments

  3. by   KatieMI
    Speaking short, what you want comes as close to "impossible" as it gets. If caring for female patients crosses your religious views, you might want to find another occupation.
  4. by   TriciaJ
    I'm thinking your best bet would be corrections. I'm not sure how many openings there are for CNAs, however.
  5. by   Been there,done that
    Cannot fathom why you feel your religious "reasons", should be accommodated .
    Half the population is female, they need care.
  6. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from Firas5
    Im a male CNA and I've worked In a facility where males were not even allowed to have female residents. If there were females in the assignment they would swap them for a male with a female CNA.

    I've recently joined another facility and I don't think it's the same.
    For religious reasons I cannot do females.

    I cannot understand how, in a non life/death situation, where a male and female CNA is available, a male CNA is changing/toileting, cleaning and dressing a woman, while on the other side of the curtain, a woman is doing the same for a man. Thats crazy and there's no explanation for this.


    Does anyone know any facilities in NYC or queens where they don't give male CNA's females?
    It's not crazy, it's happening in a professional medical setting.

    There's nothing inappropriate about it unless you feel as though there is something sexual about it - in which case the problem lies with you.
  7. by   beekee
    Mental health or substance abuse facilities may have all male and all female units. There are a couple LTC facilities in my area for elderly men who were sexual predators or substance abusers.

    However, I think the likelihood of you finding a place that will accommodate your religious beliefs is small. Have you discuss this issue with your pastor/rabbi/imam? He or she may have some guidance for you.
  8. by   PixieRN1
    I think that your first place of employment is the exception and definitely not the norm.

    I understand your values and beliefs are important and I completely respect that. However, I do think that it is more than highly unlikely that an employer could reasonably accomodate that restriction. Yes, employers cannot refuse you to be hired on the basis of your religion...but there is a big catch there.

    By law, they are only required to make reasonable accommodations for that position. A reasonable accommodation would be allowing a woman of Muslim faith to wear a hijab and cover her body completely. This does not affect patient care and is no cost to the employer, she carries an even load with the rest of the staff, so it is very reasonably accommodated.

    A Christian example would be something like this: if a pro-life registered nurse wants to work at a surgical Planned Parenthood, but she refuses to participate in the care of women who are seeking/are getting/have gotten an abortion, that Planned Parenthood would have zero obligation to hire her because she would not be able to perform many of the required roles that a RN would have to perform that may be in conflict with her religion.

    It would be a different situation if that nurse was not going to be required to provide care to abortion patients because let’s say they had a special, separate staff for that. But more than likely, she would not be allowed to pick and chose her assignments there either, so it would be a miserable fit for both parties.

    However, you would be requesting to not provide care to half of the facility’s patient population, who they are legally required to provide care for. This is unreasonable.

    For example, what would happen if the census on your unit on a given day turned out to be 80% female one only 20% male? Do you think it would be reasonable for the only other CNA on the unit to provide care for all 80% of the census, the women, while you only care for 20% of the population?

    No. That is unequivocally unfair and that is not a reasonable request to expect a facility to accomodate.

    I think if you wish to continue working as a CNA, nurse, FNP, whatever direct patient care role you may want to do in a hospital, you are going to have to try to find another needle in a haystack like your other job. But from my personal experience and in my own opinion, you will likely not find an employer willing to make that accomodation...and legally, they don’t have to.
    Last edit by PixieRN1 on Oct 7
  9. by   macawake
    Quote from Firas5
    For religious reasons I cannot do females.
    ?



    Quote from Firas5
    I cannot understand how, in a non life/death situation, where a male and female CNA is available, a male CNA is changing/toileting, cleaning and dressing a woman, while on the other side of the curtain, a woman is doing the same for a man. Thats crazy and there's no explanation for this.
    I might seem crazy to you, it doesn't to me. To me, we're first and foremost human beings. We have much more in common than differences. We laugh, we cry, we love, we hate, we hurt, we bleed. And sometimes we need help because we're injured or sick and can't care for ourselves.

    When I studied anatomy and physiology, there wasn't a man book and a woman book. Of course there was a chapter or two to cover the differences, but that's it. The essence/core that makes us human isn't really the physical body, but rather the thoughts, feelings, our actions and the hopes and fears that we all have. My advice is to help the human being in need, instead of fixating on the few body parts that are different. You think it's crazy that a man cares for a woman and vice versa. Personally, I think it's crazy to allow body parts define who you can and can't care for.

    Imagine the impact on healthcare if all staff (CNAs, nurses, physicians etc.) refused to care for human beings of the opposite biological sex...

    Forgive my ignorance, but do religions that forbid people to help a human being in need actually exist? Is there really scripture text to that effect or is it someone's interpretation? It's just seems wrong to me. Helping someone should be something we could all agree on is a "good deed".

    Quote from Firas5
    Does anyone know any facilities in NYC or queens where they don't give male CNA's females?
    As I'm not in New York or even in the U.S., I don't. The only places I can think of are all-male prisons or similar.
  10. by   TeenyTiny
    Have you searched to see if there are religous facilities that have similar or the same beliefs about care? In the south these types of facilities exist so there my be some within the area you are. This would allow for that type of accomodation.
  11. by   jennylee321
    Maybe get a job on a prostate ward?

    Just kidding, this surely does not exist, but was the first thing that popped in to my mind when reading your post.

    Did you consider your ability to only care for half of patients when you trained to be a CNA, considering that so much of a CNAs role is personal care. I wouldn't want to be a vet nurse because I'm allergic to cats and I wouldn't find a job that would accomodate me to not have to deal with cats. Maybe look into other roles such as medical assisting where the care is less personal.
  12. by   elkpark
    While I agree that being willing to only provide care for one gender is going to be problematic in most healthcare settings and may, in the end, be simply unworkable, I don't see any reason to be dismissive of anyone's religious beliefs. That's not a road I want to start down.

    OP, you may want to look into VA facilities; while they are not exclusively male, the population tends to skew heavily male. It would be easier to accommodate your needs there. Another option is religious houses; some convents and monasteries provide assisted living/SNF services for their "retired" populations. A monastery would be all-male. Orthodox Judaism traditionally limits contact, including physical contact, between males and females outside of marriage. A retirement community/healthcare facility operated by or dedicated to the orthodox Jewish community would probably offer gender-segregated services. Private duty might be another option, if an agency would be willing to assign you to only male clients.

    Of course, corrections facilities are segregated by gender. That seems like an obvious option, which you may have already considered.

    Best wishes.
  13. by   hawaiicarl
    Mr. Roarke has a place, and his little helper Tattoo will help you off the plane. It's called Fantasy Island.

    Cheers

    PS - The plane the plane
  14. by   Shananigan
    OP, consider private duty options. If it's private duty through an agency, you might be able to request only male patients.

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