What if all docs had to nurses first????? - page 3

Really! I mean think about it..... what problems would this alleviate?? A friend and I were talking about this today. After hearing and reading so much about difficult doctors, wouldn't it be... Read More

  1. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Roland
    On top of that your average doctor would be 40 before they "graduated" from their residency. Also, don't forget that many of the "atheist", pinheaded, scientifically orientated docs look down upon much of nursing. If they even touched nursing they would consider themselves unclean!
    And what does atheist have to do with looking down on others (or for that matter, scientifically oriented)?
  2. by   PA-C in Texas
    I think it would be a great idea to require a certain level of direct patient care experience for all medical school applicants. That's what happens for NP and PA school, and people often comment on how they prefer to see mid-levels rather than physicians. However, I don't think nursing is the only option. After all, nursing is not the be-all and end-all of health care (although some people wish it was).

    Medical School teaches you how to diagnose and treat disease, but it does NOT teach you how to take care of someone. How many docs do you know that know how to run an infusion pump? Empty a foley bag? Even put down the rails on a bed?

    Most of them probably don't need to know such things for their everyday practice, but perhaps if they did have to do such things, they would appreciate those who do it every day.

    I try to be very involved with the care of my patients in the ER. When its pretty slow I will start IV's and take blood myself, or administer meds, etc. One reason is that this gives me more time with the patient. Another reason is that it makes the nurses happy and nurses rule my life.

    My background has been such a big help because being a paramedic for 5 years really taught me how to relate to patients and how to communicate with them. Even though I have more knowledge now, I interact with my patients in the same way as when I was a medic. I didn't have to learn the ropes of diagnosing/treating and interpersonal skills at the same time like so many PGY 1's do.

    Just some thoughts...
  3. by   RN_Amy
    Quote from PA-C in Texas
    I think it would be a great idea to require a certain level of direct patient care experience for all medical school applicants. That's what happens for NP and PA school, and people often comment on how they prefer to see mid-levels rather than physicians. However, I don't think nursing is the only option. After all, nursing is not the be-all and end-all of health care (although some people wish it was).

    Medical School teaches you how to diagnose and treat disease, but it does NOT teach you how to take care of someone. How many docs do you know that know how to run an infusion pump? Empty a foley bag? Even put down the rails on a bed?
    I TOTALLY agree re. nurses thinking nursing is THE be-all and end-all of health care....

    In my opinion, I don't think nurses give doctors enough credit... I agree that junior and other doctors (as quoted above) may not know how to do the simplest of patient care tasks... but this is due to the fact they are not nurses or trained as such... they are trained to be doctors... to diagnose and treat illnesses. (Try dealing with consultant anaesthetists or surgeons which I do a day to day basis!).

    I think it all comes down to the age old debate - nursing versus medicine. How many ignorant arrogant *****y nurses are out there practicising who think they know more than they do? Just a little food for thought.
  4. by   NursesRmofun
    I agree that a lot of doctors don't get enough credit....and personally, most of the docs I have worked with in the last decade and a half have been great! Most have been very empathetic to nursing. I would never want the responsibility of being a doc. I can barely stand all the responsibility I have now!

    I entirely missed the comments about "...atheist, pinheaded,..." etc., the first time around. I guess I wasn't reading it all the way through. Maybe it was a poor, innocent attempt at being funny.

    However, having docs do a nursing rotation is not a bad idea!
    Last edit by NursesRmofun on Apr 3, '04 : Reason: typos
  5. by   menetopali
    steph,

    i actually think that it would be a positive thing to have nurses shadowing a doc for a brief rotation as well, and for the same reason that i think it would be positive for new docs to do a brief nurse rotation. you're right, it is a two-way street, and both disciplines could use some more exposure to the world of the other. IMHO
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from meownsmile
    If all docs had to be nurses first, we wouldnt have any doctors
    I agree lol.
  7. by   beckymcrn
    Quote from cc nrse
    i have often said it should be a prereq for medical school. then maybe we wouldn't get so many stupid and unreasonable orders!!! if only they could walk a day in our shoes!!!


    i absolutely agree!!!!!! :chuckle
  8. by   fergus51
    I would imagine a lot of patient care aides and CNAs would say the same thing about nurses.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I wouldn't say that necessarily. Quite a few nurses i've worked with worked as an aide through college.
  10. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    I wouldn't say that necessarily. Quite a few nurses i've worked with worked as an aide through college.
    Well, not trying to pat my own back, but I did all three...CNA/Tech, LPN and now RN. I think it is good to experience other positions. However, I would make a bad doc, I'm afraid! I better skip any rotations in the Doc's seat! LOL! :uhoh21:
  11. by   orrnlori
    I work with residents every day in the OR. One of the first things they learn is to listen to and respect the nurses (the attendings tell them this, I've heard it with my own ears!). They may go on to be holy terrors for all I know, but while they are in my OR they are all great and I consider them to be my babies, I raise them up and I watch them go on to be "real" doctors. I hope that my working wth them helps them to be good to nurses in the future.

    While it might be helpful to have medical students and residents shadow a nurse for 6 weeks or whatever, ultimately I don't think it would make much difference, if someone has the propensity to be a jerk, he's gonna be a jerk no matter what. If someone doesn't want to understand then they won't.
  12. by   BabyRN2Be
    Hey, one of the nursing schools that I'm applying to has a CNA requirement before you can work on your RN - we'll have empathy for the CNA's we work with.

    Maybe docs would have some compassion for nurses if they had to walk in our shoes.
  13. by   sharann
    I think that no matter what, some people are just plain rude, mean, insensetive or whatever...then, they become nurses, doctors, teachers, lawyers.....
    The two most caring and tolerant surgeons I ever worked with and saw in action in and out of the O.R, were former ORDERLIES before or in med school. They knew how long it really took to get a pt from their room to OR, helped transfer heavy pts, and even helped with prepping and IV starts. They are some kind of heroes to me.

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