This person outranks me?! - page 4

Since I started working in health care as a CNA nearly six years ago, I've had many experiences that have left me wondering how some people get into the positions they hold. I was not a youngin when... Read More

  1. by   NurseCard
    I've been a nurse 14 years and I still ask questions that some would think are
    stupid. There's a TON of things I still don't know. A TON.

    I would have asked about the sputum. Definitely.

    Being a good nurse doesn't mean knowing everything. On the flip,
    there are nurses who know a lot, who just aren't good at taking
    care of people.
  2. by   mrsboots87
    I had to ask a CNA yesterday where to put the lab label on a urine tube. It doesn't make me dumb for not knowing. Our lab is picky about where the label goes on certain tests my CNAs are so wonderful I've never had to label the urine tubes before. It's pretty crappy to think that some people might think me an idiot for not k owing something so "simple".

    OP, get over yourself. He asked a few questions that you found dumb. But no patient harm was done and these are not questions that depict what kind of nurse he is in my mind.
  3. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    While I don't agree that the OP provided examples of it, I do agree that there is such thing as a stupid question...
    Why? Please do be specific and don't cut your reply short because I really don't understand how you determine a question to be stupid or not.
  4. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Pepper The Cat
    True story.
    I am checking in my assignment. I see for 1 pt CHG Vitals q shift. I think and I think and I think. What the heck are CHG vitals? I have 32 years experience. I finally ask the day charge nurse (I was working evenings) , she less experience than me. I say "what are CHG vitals?"
    She looks at me and says " I have no idea"
    So together, we look,thru the orders,
    The order? Change vitals to q shift! Duh!
    But there I was a very experienced nurses, asking a stupid question, but ask it I did.
    So the moral of my story is that sometimes you just have to ask the stupid question!
    Why do you say your question was stupid? Whoever wrote the order must have used an unauthorized abbreviation. And left out "to".
  5. by   Aunt Slappy
    Quote from FullGlass
    He is an RN and you are not. He went to school, earned a degree, and passed the NCLEX. You did not. RNs outrank CNAs. If you want to be his peer, then go to school and get an RN.
    I am not a CNA. Reading comprehension seems to be an issue in this thread.

    Anyway.....I guess you had to be there. Since this thread has become all about attacking me, I hope it dies soon. And as to the expressed concern for my workplace attitude, I'm well-liked and have been told many times that I'm a good teammate by people who have no motivation or investment in telling me things that aren't true. I answered this nurse's questions politely at work, as is required of professionals. However, we all have thoughts that cross our minds privately and this board is advertised as a safe place to share those.

    Clearly, that's not entirely true. So beat this piñata further if it pleases you, but I'm done participating.
    Last edit by Aunt Slappy on Dec 15, '17
  6. by   klone
    Sorry the thread didn't turn out the way you had hoped. Better luck next time!
  7. by   NurseCard
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    I am not a CNA. Reading comprehension seems to be an issue in this thread.

    Anyway.....I guess you had to be there. Since this thread has become all about attacking me, I hope it dies soon. And as to the expressed concern for my workplace attitude, I'm well-liked and have been told many times that I'm a good teammate by people who have no motivation or investment in telling me things that aren't true. I answered this nurse's questions politely at work, as is required of professionals. However, we all have thoughts that cross our minds privately and this board is advertised as a safe place to share those.

    Clearly, that's not entirely true. So beat this piñata further if it pleases you, but I'm done participating.
    When I first read your original post, I had a difficult time knowing how to respond.
    I mean, we do have fun here... we really do. The problem I guess is that the
    examples that you provided weren't found by the general population of this board
    to be particularly outrageous; they seemed like kinda typical questions that
    someone at work might ask another person. You found them to be
    ridiculous questions and made that obvious in your post. Readers of this
    board took exception to that because... they are questions that a lot
    of us could see ourselves asking!

    Now maybe if your examples were just a BIT more outrageous, "out
    there", then maybe you would have gotten different responses.
    For example... if your coworker had walked up to you with
    a speci cup full of pee and asked "is this stool sample acceptable"?
    Or, if they walked up to you with a bedpan in hand and asked,
    "what is this and what am I supposed to do with it"?

    Like klone, I'm sorry it didn't go the way you wanted it to!
    I've tried starting "share your experiences" threads myself,
    only to have them bomb.
  8. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    Let's use a little critical thinking here. If you need a sample of pulmonary sputum for testing, and it now includes gastric contents, is that a valid sample?
    I am so good at critical thinking skills, that I would call the lab and ask them.
    It would be better than asking a co-worker that would judge me for asking a good question.
  9. by   OyWithThePoodles
    TO THIS DAY I can never remember the right way a bed pan goes. I was a CNA at 17 and have been a nurse for 10 years. Every single time I have to ask the right way to do it. For some reason my brain just won't process it. It's embarrassing. My aides know that it is my weakness. So if I am the one placing the bed pan they will go ahead and say "Other way Poodles!" But they never make me feel stupid. The questions the nurse was asking you, weren't anything you should be making him feel bad for.

    My now sister-in-law was in the CNA class with me in high school. For our certification test, I got blood pressure, she got bed pan. She failed and quit nursing all together. I thank my lucky stars I didn't get bed pan that day!
  10. by   Tenebrae
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    ...I guess you had to be there. Since this thread has become all about attacking me, I hope it dies soon. .

    Persecution complex much?

    No ones attacking you, what people have been saying is that the several examples you have shared in this thread do not necessarily indicate a deficiency of knowledge.


    If you have an issue with being outranked by people whom you feel have a knowledge deficit, seize the day and go back and get your RN
  11. by   del28
    Your story kind of reminds me of my son...he is not in medical, but IT...however, the "experience" vs. "education," is starting to bite him. He is 26 and went to school for chemical engineering and has a huge knack for computer coding and anything computer related. However, he quit school when he had the opportunity to work for a scientist as an understudy-- he worked with him for about 6 months, but the funding for the project fell through. My son then had school loans and an unsteady academic background. However, with his background of knowledge, he got into the ground floor of some 3-D computer imaging for a large supplier of car parts. It didn't take long for the staff to find out that he was smarter than some of the degree carrying IT guys, and much of the higher personal pass the IT department to find my son to work on a difficult computer problems.

    The problem with this is that my son was seeing that he was only receiving a small portion of income, as this field requires the degrees- as does nursing. He was becoming agitated with the IT department and higher personal asking him to do the difficult work! HE QUIT! And right after he gave them the news, they told him that they were planning on giving him his own office and a raise (although until he got that degree- it would still be lower than others in the department) But, now he realizes he should have stayed and just got back into school- living very low for a while and getting the degree that would give him the pay he deserved. I know that is a frustrating feeling! But instead of being discouraged? You should be thankful for what YOU know. Even if you can't go back to school and get that degree- YOU CAN be recognized as a valuable asset in the company you work for and they will want to keep you! Don't let someone's higher pay and lesser knowledge drive you crazy. Be the best you can for your whole company and the patients- and make yourself a valuable asset. I'm sorry, but like my son, the bad attitude will make you the opposite, and possibly replaceable....despite your great knowledge. Good luck!
  12. by   msufan3710
    This sounds like personal issues. Get over it, or move to another job.
  13. by   Orion81RN
    Quote from Aunt Slappy
    Let's use a little critical thinking here. If you need a sample of pulmonary sputum for testing, and it now includes gastric contents, is that a valid sample?
    For TB? What critical thinking should we know if we are NOT in this area of expertise? I like to think my critical thinking skills are pretty good, with some duh moments like everyone. But I have zero clue how gastric contents would affect this spwcific test. For that matter Ive never heard of sputum culture for TB, so because that is not my area, I should give my degree back. Boy am I dumb for not knowing this.

    Now, can you give me an in depth lecture on multi-system organ failure and nursing implications? Because that's an example of extra knowledge you gain going from LPN to RN. Not the silly examples you gave.

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