Thank You for Nothing - page 2

by Ashley, PICU RN

42,552 Views | 48 Comments

As nurses, it’s our job to make patients better, to improve their lives in some way. For acute care nurses, the goal is to help patients recover from an illness, surgery, or accident. Rehab nurses help patients reach their... Read More


  1. 29
    Quote from mindlor
    Actually, the very next paragraph states that it is a PICU nurses job to fix children.....i am just a student but I see many nurses with this mindset and it limits their practice....

    Just saying...
    As a student and NOT a nurse yet, you may be better served if you would shut the front door and LISTEN to what nurses are talking about, before you judge what sort of "mindset" they should have.

    Just saying........
    LovedRN, Sparrowhawk, hereicome, and 26 others like this.
  2. 0
    In all seriousness, this is why I hate working with children and am dreading doing my peds rotation soon.
  3. 0
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    As a student and NOT a nurse yet, you may be better served if you would shut the front door and LISTEN to what nurses are talking about, before you judge what sort of "mindset" they should have.

    Just saying........
    Just as I expected, a few replies with nothing more than personal attacks with nothing further to add that has any intellectual basis or value....sad
  4. 13
    Yep - 1st post!

    Speaking as a family member who went through what you've described - there's quite a bit more to that "nothing" than you may realize. No - you can't always save a patient, and we family members recognize that, even though we may be remiss in saying so. But, one of the things I found (and ultimately caused me to decide to join the ranks of the nursing profession) was that there comes a time when you have to switch over from seeing the person in the bed (or crib) as the patient, to seeing the person next to the bed (or crib) as the patient. They're the ones you can help, and just the simple act of a pat on the shoulder can mean so very much to those stalwart, exhausted, and ultimately loving folks who take on the challenge of standing by their loved one when it's their time to go.

    So - on behalf of all the families who've been there, are there now or who are going there - a heartfelt "thank you" for helping us in our ultimate time of need.

    Blessings,



    IEDave
    janfrn, Bortaz, RN, ashleyisawesome, and 10 others like this.
  5. 19
    Quote from mindlor
    Just as I expected, a few replies with nothing more than personal attacks with nothing further to add that has any intellectual basis or value....sad
    Really? This from the person who admittedly stopped reading [the article] after the first sentence...........

    Sorry for the brief hijack. Please carry on.
    Last edit by VivaLasViejas on Nov 5, '11
    LovedRN, nkochrn, Sparrowhawk, and 16 others like this.
  6. 15
    Lovely article.

    I find it difficult to see the futile care that is sometimes inflicted on patients (often elderly in my case). While I do know how difficult these situations are for families, it is also difficult for us. I love that this post shows me that I am not alone in struggling with these feelings.

    I hate the nights when I have to pray that a particular "full code" patient does not code on my watch - simply because it would break my heart and my spirit to have to do it.
    janfrn, sharpeimom, CrazierThanYou, and 12 others like this.
  7. 14
    I'm sitting here with tears on my face. I know what that situation's like with adults who are in our ICU for months, repeatedly coded when there's nothing good we can do except to stop "doing," and I can't imagine how heartbreaking it must be with a child. And, like Do-over, I've had nights at the bedside where I am silently pleading with the patient and God that they not code until the family finally understands that all a code is going to do is hurt, not help. Many a night I've watched monitors and falling vital signs, praying, "Please, don't make me do this..." It's bad enough to witness this at the end of life, and I can't imagine what it must be like to see this at the beginning....great article about things that needed to be said.

    And as for the other stuff....well, the ignore button works wonders. *sigh*
    Bortaz, RN, donsterRN, janfrn, and 11 others like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from IEDave
    Yep - 1st post!

    Speaking as a family member who went through what you've described - there's quite a bit more to that "nothing" than you may realize. No - you can't always save a patient, and we family members recognize that, even though we may be remiss in saying so. But, one of the things I found (and ultimately caused me to decide to join the ranks of the nursing profession) was that there comes a time when you have to switch over from seeing the person in the bed (or crib) as the patient, to seeing the person next to the bed (or crib) as the patient. They're the ones you can help, and just the simple act of a pat on the shoulder can mean so very much to those stalwart, exhausted, and ultimately loving folks who take on the challenge of standing by their loved one when it's their time to go.

    So - on behalf of all the families who've been there, are there now or who are going there - a heartfelt "thank you" for helping us in our ultimate time of need.

    Blessings,



    IEDave
    Great first post! Thanks, its nice to hear.
    hereicome likes this.
  9. 1
    Great article I passed our local board exam, now waiting for my license and I want to be a pedia nurse in a pedia ward or a PICU nurse. The child is not the only one needing care here in the scenario of the article, but also the family. We nurses should be strong, brave and be prepared for such cases which are emotionally draining. I am thinking to myself... what if something like this will happen and how can I be therapeutic to these family members? A Patient who is under "CODE" and then has a negative outcome can be really saddening for the family members but when the nurse becomes a partner to the acceptance for the loss or in a way, be a comfort person, I think it can be helpful to lessen their pain.
    Ashley, PICU RN likes this.
  10. 7
    Quote from IEDave
    Yep - 1st post!

    Speaking as a family member who went through what you've described - there's quite a bit more to that "nothing" than you may realize. No - you can't always save a patient, and we family members recognize that, even though we may be remiss in saying so. But, one of the things I found (and ultimately caused me to decide to join the ranks of the nursing profession) was that there comes a time when you have to switch over from seeing the person in the bed (or crib) as the patient, to seeing the person next to the bed (or crib) as the patient. They're the ones you can help, and just the simple act of a pat on the shoulder can mean so very much to those stalwart, exhausted, and ultimately loving folks who take on the challenge of standing by their loved one when it's their time to go.

    So - on behalf of all the families who've been there, are there now or who are going there - a heartfelt "thank you" for helping us in our ultimate time of need.

    Blessings,



    IEDave
    Caregiver role strain is often mislooked or forgotten, whether it be with the parents of a child with developmental difficulties, a child of a parent with dementia and multiple comorbidities, a spouse of a pt with multiple chronic health issues.

    A family is a tightly meshed unit, and one that is strained beyond the breaking point is one in which functional grieving cannot occur. Illness, infections, hospitalizations are stressful upon the entire family unit. Sometimes I don't think we have enough nursing diagnoses for the families of pts, nor anywhere near enough resources.

    When I have a family sitting in patient hospice that grows close to me, it is the most exhausting nursing I can do. I can say I will always do everything in my power to make it as good a death as it can be. Death doesn't have to be an ugly event. If I can guide the family through the stages of grief to where it is accepted, and to where it is not a traumatic event. Where it is a sigh, a whisper, with holding of hands, a kiss...then I have done the pt a favor, and eased the role strain.

    For those family that choose to do everything, I will say to them. "We did everything we could" I will let them have the comfort of knowing that they fought to the end. Just please don't let it happen on my shift. I so regret some of the codes I have had to do.


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