Rastafari nurse and marijuana use - page 2

I hope I don't start any arguments/debates with this....if so, please feel more than welcome to delete! I have a friend who is in the first year of nursing school(finished pre-reqs and is in the... Read More

  1. by   Indy
    I think as far as the peyote thing goes... that's probably the only substance other than wine at catholic mass, that the government recognizes as part of a religion. I don't think rastafarians (sp?) have gone through the process to make the government recognize them as a religion, and to recognize their use of marijuana for that purpose. So no, I don't think it will fly.

    Not only that, but when she starts flunking drug tests for pre-employment, she will be at risk for someone to report her to the BON in her state. If the word should get out at school that she uses regularly, and if the school has in their policies a random drug test or whatnot (some do, mine didn't) then there could be problems there, possibly the kind that would keep her from graduating or land her in jail. Speaking of which, she does know that a conviction for possession would probably keep her BON from issuing her a license at all, yes?
  2. by   Quickbeam
    I just read an article the other day about people who use medical marijuana. Specifically, they highlighted a stockbroker who is one of the last remaining people in the federal medical marijuana trial from the 70's. The article explored this as a worker's rights issue and was very clear that in no state does a worker have a right to smoke marijuana or use marijauna at work. This applies even to states who allow medical marijuana. These workers are at the mercy of employer rules which can legally bar that person from employment. The stockbroker in question has an employer who supports him but it was noted that it was totally the employer's voluntary choice.

    I think it was in the NY Times but they archive articles after 24 hours so I can't link.
  3. by   Indy
    Huh. Well that's a completely different angle, but a good one. So disabled people are allowed to smoke if it's medical and in specific spots where that's legal, but people who might have any paying job, can't smoke...

    Interesting.
  4. by   TraumaICURN
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I just read an article the other day about people who use medical marijuana. Specifically, they highlighted a stockbroker who is one of the last remaining people in the federal medical marijuana trial from the 70's. The article explored this as a worker's rights issue and was very clear that in no state does a worker have a right to smoke marijuana or use marijauna at work. This applies even to states who allow medical marijuana. These workers are at the mercy of employer rules which can legally bar that person from employment. The stockbroker in question has an employer who supports him but it was noted that it was totally the employer's voluntary choice.

    I think it was in the NY Times but they archive articles after 24 hours so I can't link.
    The OP is saying that the nursing student is using it for religious reasons....not because of any medical issues. So she wouldn't be able to use that excuse anyway.
  5. by   Quickbeam
    The OP is saying that the nursing student is using it for religious reasons....not because of any medical issues. So she wouldn't be able to use that excuse anyway.
    Yes, I realized that. I felt it was helpful to offer information that was relevant. I still feel it was a germane post.
  6. by   rita359
    As for Catholics and the use of wine, wine is used during Mass and Catholics can receive wine at Communion but we are talking about a sip not a guzzle. A sip of wine would not be mind altering and would not show up on a drug screen even if you went to Mass every day and received wine. Its not like we use it at home and drink glasses of it as a religious observance.
  7. by   Indy
    Quote from rita359
    As for Catholics and the use of wine, wine is used during Mass and Catholics can receive wine at Communion but we are talking about a sip not a guzzle. A sip of wine would not be mind altering and would not show up on a drug screen even if you went to Mass every day and received wine. Its not like we use it at home and drink glasses of it as a religious observance.
    Hey, I didn't intend to offend or imply that catholics drink a lot of wine. And you're right, a sip doesn't alter one's ability to think clearly.
  8. by   BrnEyedGirl
    I'm suprised she even made it into school!! Wasn't she required to have a drug screen to get in?? The fact is, it's illegal,.angainst the law,.not only is she risking her career prospects,.she might find herself in jail!!!
  9. by   meownsmile
    I didnt have to have a drug screen prior to school, but you sure will have one pre-employment. I agree, its an illegal substance in this country and claiming religious practice isnt going to hold water, she would still be arrested for possession if caught with it/under the influence.
    Just as someone whos religion tells them they cant work on sunday. Well dont get a job that requires sunday schedules. I really doubt that they would accomodate that schedule unless someone else were WANTING to work EVERY sunday.
    She may want to think about forgoing that religious practice while living in the states.
  10. by   sirI
    From what I understand of this religion (way of life, etc.), partaking in marijuana (ganja) use is optional and not a requirement.
  11. by   NurseguyFL
    Quote from ncriverrat
    As part of her religion and culture, she smokes marijuana, and she says it is part of the way she lives, just like other traditions she adheres to.

    We had a discussion regarding this and her future employment possibilities.
    She told me that since this was part of her religion, that no employer could discriminate against her.

    Your friend has the right to believe whatever she wants to, but her assumptions about the law are incorrect. What she's telling you is also not true about marijuana and rastafarianism. Many Rastas are very health conscious people and they do not smoke marijuana. Regularly smoking majiruana may have been part of her traditional way of life in Jamaica, but here in the US it can land her jail. Marijuana use in the US is illegal, and she cannot use her 'culture' as an excuse to break the law. In fact, if she's not a US citizen and she is arrested for possessing marijuana, she can even be deported. She is quite mistaken to believe that it is discrimination for an employer to decide not to hire her if they find out that she's regularly using marijuana.

    In any case, how safe a practitioner does this person think she can be if she shows up for work while high on weed. Would you want to be a patient that she's taking care of? I wouldn't. Your friend has her priorities mixed up. Either she want's to smoke weed and get high, or she wants to be a safe clinician. Its not possible to be both.
  12. by   classicdame
    Does that religion require her to be stoned all the time? Can she not choose when to use?

    Sounds like the religion is an excuse to use dope and is already causing her problems. What about her patients? Will they appreciate the fact that she is using mind-altering drugs while caring for them. No way!
  13. by   MikeyJ
    One of my pre-nursing classes last year had incorporated a cultural aspect into the class where groups were instructed to give a very lengthy presentation on a specific culture, as well as turn in a very lengthy research paper. The point of the project was to educate other students on a particular culture from a nursing stand point.

    My group happened to choose Jamaica and we focused very heavily on Rastafarianism. After doing a great deal of research we had discovered that marijuana use is obviously optional, and in fact the percentage of Rastafarian's that use marijuana wasn't as high as I had suspected it to be. We were also able to get some insight from a gentelman in our class who was born and raised in Jamaica and is Rastafarian. He had just been accepted into the nursing school, and I questioned him on whether he used marijuana. He said while he lived in Jamaica he would periodically use; however, when he arrived in the U.S. him and his wife decided they would not use because it is obviously illegal, and would not want to jeopardize their careers/future/family. He reiterated that it is not a requirement of the religion, and agreed that Rastafarian's living in the U.S. (or any other country where marijauna is illegal) should cease using.

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