Pregnant and new job

  1. I've scoured the internet for advice on this and have asked some close friends but I am still not sure what to do.

    I was recruited for an ICU position at a different hospital than I am currently working in and I accepted. When they called, my husband and I had just found out the week prior that I was pregnant. We hadn't had our first ultrasound or anything. When I start orientation (orientation will be 7 weeks long before going on the floor), I will be just shy of 13 weeks pregnant. We haven't even publicly announce our pregnancy to anyone other than close family and several of our closest friends.

    What is the proper etiquette on this?
    Obviously I didn't mention it in my interview because we hadn't even confirmed viability (we had been having difficulty conceiving). But now, I feel like I am walking this line of we aren't even comfortable telling friends, coworkers, and extended family yet let alone my employer. I know they can't fire me for being pregnant, but I'm not even past the first trimester and as I mentioned, I don't like the idea of telling people I'm closer to, so I don't want to rush to tell my new employer right this instant. But I don't want to wait so long they would think I was trying to hide it from them.

    So I'm debating between telling them at the start of orientation (around 13 weeks), after I have my 16 week ultrasound, or at the end of orientation (around 19 weeks). I don't think it would be a good idea to wait any longer than that.

    What should I do? Particularly interested in hearing from nurse managers or those who have anything to do with the hiring process.
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  2. Poll: When to tell new employer I'm pregnant?

    • At the start of orientation (13 weeks)

      27.27% 6
    • During orientation after 16 week ultrasound

      9.09% 2
    • At the end of orientation (19 weeks)

      18.18% 4
    • Literally ASAP!! Even before starting orientation

      36.36% 8
    • Wait even longer

      9.09% 2
    22 Votes
  3. 18 Comments

  4. by   Sour Lemon
    I'd be more worried about leave and possibly short term disability pay. For my first baby, I got $1000 a week, tax free, for about 6 months. I was a full time employee. For my second baby, I got the minimum amount of time off and no pay at all. I only worked occasionally at that point.
  5. by   R5RN
    I have already reviewed their maternity and FMLA leaves and have no concerns in that regard, but thank you.
  6. by   EllaBella1
    I would tell them at the start of orientation for your own safety. There are plenty of assignments that pregnant women should not take, and we see them a lot in ICU. You're gonna wanna refuse droplet rooms, shingles rooms, etc for baby's safety.
  7. by   LovingLife123
    I would tell them early on so they know how to schedule you safely with patients. There are certain diseases you will see especially in icu that you should not come into contact with. It's not really that big of a deal.
  8. by   dstee009
    you need to tell the new job that offered you icu position. they probably arent looking to train someone who will then turn around and take at least 3 months off. Its pretty selfish on your part to even think that would be ok. to dump the extra responsibility on the unit of having to cover for 3 months that you are brand new to isnt ok either. Stay at your current job until you can make a real commitment to the new job.

    they cant fire you for being pregnant but they also dont have to hire you either. its pretty shady to hide it to secure a position.
    Last edit by dstee009 on Aug 6
  9. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from dstee009
    you need to tell the new job that offered you icu position. they probably arent looking to train someone who will then turn around and take at least 3 months off. Its pretty selfish on your part to even think that would be ok. to dump the extra responsibility on the unit of having to cover for 3 months that you are brand new to isnt ok either. Stay at your current job until you can make a real commitment to the new job.

    they cant fire you for being pregnant but they also dont have to hire you either. its pretty shady to hide it to secure a position.
    Her question was not should she take the position, but when should she tell. Pregnant women/mothers DO have the right to advance our careers, after all; plus, employees in general do have the right to consider our own needs when making career decisions. And as my manager said (I had conceived in between interview and offer), "When hiring large numbers of young women, babies happen."

    Now if she plans to be a SAHM after her leave sure...I'd agree that she isn't the best candidate. But if she is planning to return? The hospital still gets its staff member -- after a temporary medical leave which is par for the course with women of childbearing age.
  10. by   KelRN215
    Quote from dstee009
    you need to tell the new job that offered you icu position. they probably arent looking to train someone who will then turn around and take at least 3 months off. Its pretty selfish on your part to even think that would be ok. to dump the extra responsibility on the unit of having to cover for 3 months that you are brand new to isnt ok either. Stay at your current job until you can make a real commitment to the new job.

    they cant fire you for being pregnant but they also dont have to hire you either. its pretty shady to hide it to secure a position.
    OP has already been offered and accepted the position. It would be illegal for the new employer to rescind the offer over her pregnancy. I have encountered this situation with colleagues before. One nurse and one CNA. The nurse was in a similar situation to the OP, found out she was pregnant either shortly after accepting or shortly after starting the new position. I don't remember when she told management but she got a maternity leave, came back and then left not long after. The CNA knew she was pregnant and intentionally hid it during the interviewing process. She actually still works on that floor many years later.
  11. by   AceOfHearts<3
    Quote from R5RN
    I have already reviewed their maternity and FMLA leaves and have no concerns in that regard, but thank you.
    FMLA applies only after a year with the employer:

    An employee who works for a covered employer must meet three criteria in order to be eligible for FMLA leave. The employee must:
    • Have worked for the employer for at least 12 months;
    • Have at least 1,250 hours of service in the 12 months before taking leave;* and
    • Work at a location where the employer has at least 50 employees within 75 miles of the employee’s worksite.
    https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/complia...ers/fmlaen.pdf
  12. by   Jolie
    Pregnancy is not your employer's business unless and until you require consideration for your or your baby's safety and well-being.

    When you reasonably anticipate the need for modifications (such as not being exposed to X-rays, chemo, or other teratogenic agents) speak confidentially to your supervisor. Until then, it is entirely your choice.

    Best of health to you!
  13. by   3ringnursing
    I think it is none of their business until you are ready to share. I recall a new hire when I was working ICU that I didn't notice until well into her 3rd trimester since she was extremely physically fit. It didn't impact her ability to work in the least. Now this is one women, not at all how I was affected, but your personal business is yours to share when you are ready - I truly do not believe this can be cause for you to be penalized for. Reproduction is not punishable.

    You know, this would be a great question to ask Nurse Beth about! She has much knowledge and information that would be beneficial to you. Ask her. She would be a great source of Information.

    Many blessings to you and your family!
  14. by   DTWriter
    So weird...I just read a manga's chapter on a related topic: Please wait 5 seconds... (The whole manga is awesome and educational at the same time. High recommend. Side note: The manga's pages are read right to left.)

    To get back to the point: You should tell them as soon as possible - for your safety and that of the baby, and so you may possibly postpone your orientation. You may have to reapply this job opening and others again after you have the baby; unless you are desperate for money, this would be the safer choice. A sane, hiring manager should understand the delay.
    Last edit by DTWriter on Aug 6
  15. by   R5RN
    To address some questions I see popping up, I absolutely have every intention of returning to work after what I anticipate being a short maternity leave. Being a stay at home mother is not for me.

    I also completely understand the risk of receiving certain precautions patients and I'm sure everyone's OB is different, but my OB has stated I am able to take any patient so long as I utilize appropriate PPE (obviously). However, I do see how this is a reason to mention my pregnancy sooner rather than later.

    I have started orientation and was relieved to see several OBVIOUSLY pregnant nurses in orientation, which makes me feel very comfortable about telling my manager.

    At this time, I have decided to tell her the next time I see her, and if I do not see her this week during orientation, I will ask to meet with her specifically. I am still in my first trimester, so I have a good 6.5 months of being able to work, and I anticipate my maternity leave not being longer than 6-8 weeks. I will not make specific claims to her about how long my maternity leave will be, because of course there could be complications, but without a doubt my intention is to work my pregnant little butt off leading up until I deliver and then I'll be returning my non-pregnant butt back to work as soon as reasonably possible.

    Quote from dstee009
    you need to tell the new job that offered you icu position. they probably arent looking to train someone who will then turn around and take at least 3 months off. Its pretty selfish on your part to even think that would be ok. to dump the extra responsibility on the unit of having to cover for 3 months that you are brand new to isnt ok either. Stay at your current job until you can make a real commitment to the new job.

    they cant fire you for being pregnant but they also dont have to hire you either. its pretty shady to hide it to secure a position.
    As I stated in my original post, I have already accepted the position. So moving on...

    Quote from AceOfHearts<3
    FMLA applies only after a year with the employer:



    https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/complia...ers/fmlaen.pdf
    As I already noted, I have reviewed the maternity leave and have no concerns. While my new position is in a different hospital, it is under the same umbrella entity as the hospital I am coming from and therefore, per their policies, I am considered an employee of the same company. The same benefits will apply as this is considered a "transfer" position.

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