Phone, cell, beeper and texting. - page 2

by imintrouble

5,901 Views | 39 Comments

Nurses are texting MDs. Cell phones instead of home phones. Beepers are obsolete. What's the world coming to? Change comes slowly to my area of the country. Texting for orders instead of talking, is slowly making its way to my... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Morganalefey
    I have not seen any texting happening at my hospital.
    There are a handful of DR's that prefer to be called on their cell phone, and if I leave a VM, I leave it w/o any personal info. I simply say: "Hi Dr. so-and-so, this is Morganalefey from ABC Hospital's cardiac unit. I have a question about a pt. Please call me back at 555-1212."

    Mostly we page or call the answering service and they page/call doc at home/on cell phone.
    I would be more comfortable with the basics as you describe, but we were instructed to give a brief message concerning the call.
    How long do you wait before you repeat the call, when there is no response?
  2. 1
    Quote from imintrouble
    I would be more comfortable with the basics as you describe, but we were instructed to give a brief message concerning the call.
    How long do you wait before you repeat the call, when there is no response?

    Honestly, I've never had that happen. Like I said, it's only a few doc's. But how long I would wait would depend on the severity of the situation. Just like when I page them and they don't call me back.
    imintrouble likes this.
  3. 1
    Our texting is also done through an online system. If they deny getting a page, they can all easily be traced - and yes, we've had to do it.

    It is also our policy that docs are required to respond to a page within 5 minutes.
    imintrouble likes this.
  4. 1
    In a word, HIPAA.

    I'm an APN and I use only my cell phone. My voicemail on my cell phone states who they have reached, which practice I work for and to leave a brief message.
    imintrouble likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    In a word, HIPAA.

    I'm an APN and I use only my cell phone. My voicemail on my cell phone states who they have reached, which practice I work for and to leave a brief message.
    Do you use that brief message to judge which situation you can postpone? Or do you respond to each with the same speed?
    Obviously somebody with a pressure of 70/30 would need a quicker response than somebody who had an earache.
    Do you use your cell phone to screen?
    Last edit by imintrouble on Feb 18, '13
  6. 1
    I leave a msg with only my name, unit, hospital and call back # on it. No pt details, however I just realized when the answering services page I guess they send them the pt name and details though. Me, personally , have never left pt details in the MSG.
    imintrouble likes this.
  7. 4
    I worked at a hospital with text paging. I loved it and the doctors liked it because it helped them prioritize. Sometimes they would not have to call back - you could text, "pt XX in room 4 has a K of 3.0, please advise." Then a few minutes later an order for potassium would pop up. If they didn't respond, we'd use the paging system and try to contact them. However, I have heard that at that hospital the use of text paging was being limited anymore because people were texting "books" about critical situations which was inappropriate. I didn't text regarding critical situations.

    If I have to leave a message on a doctors voicemail I only state "This is Jennifer a nurse at XX hospital. I am calling regarding your patient in room 222. Please call back at this number."

    If I can't text, I prefer paging services because the service documents each time you put out the call, so therefore it is on record when you attempted a call a doctor 5 times and he or she did not call back. I've also had a doctor tell me she preferred the paging system for the same reason. (Ironically, it was a doctor notorious for not returning calls..) But I know some doctors have their pages texted to them, so the patient's info is relayed on the text message.

    I think it all comes with the times, if doctors and nurses can work together using new technology in the best interest of the patient, I feel that everyone benefits.
    imintrouble, RNperdiem, madwife2002, and 1 other like this.
  8. 2
    We don't text Doctors, but we are calling cell phones for orders, and leaving a brief message re: patient concerns is common. That's the norm.
    imintrouble and madwife2002 like this.
  9. 1
    As said on a previous thread, I text my MD with simple requests or asking for orders
    Sometimes I email him for longer decisions I need

    If it is an emergency then I call him on his cell phone or who ever is on call-answering services take too long and I am giving them as much critical information as if I was texting or calling him direct!

    They ask nonsensical questions and delay responses from the dr, they have no medical knowledge and it seems to take for ever when all you want is a instant order, which 9 times out of 10 you already know what to do you just need the go ahead.

    Text messaging gives you a time line plus it confirms that you contacted the dr and if he responded or not

    You obviously have to use common sense when using such forms of communication
    imintrouble likes this.
  10. 1
    We text to the dr's pager for non-critical things like a k+ of 3, a positive response to an intervention, etc. As a night nurse, I like the option because I'm less likely to be screamed/snarked/lectured at for waking someone up. /kind of sad, actually
    imintrouble likes this.


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