LPN to RN through testing? - page 7

I just feel that I'm going to get a lot of flak on this, but here goes...Since there's such a nursing shortage, why not let LPN's take the RN test with some parameters? I just thought of a few: 5... Read More

  1. by   muffylpn
    Ok I have read all the posts now- first if your state says you need
    English 1+2 then you do- unless you clep it. LPN with numerous years
    of exp in a certain field should allowed to sit for a clinical final with
    a college professor of nursing, they should be the ones allowed to
    decide if that person has enough skill to pass an RN boards tests.
    No, there should be no easy road but it should be a better road t
    In Mass. if any of your sciences are over
    5 yrs old you MUST re-take them, so that fact that after LPN school
    I went and sat at a community college took AP 1+2 and Micro 10yrs
    ago and then life got in the way means nothing- see that is not fair.
  2. by   RN34TX
    Quote from muffylpn
    but to allow RN to
    come from other countries with a peice of paper stamped/ noterized
    by their school and allow them to sit without fully checking what
    classes they took and how well they read or understand English is
    not acceptable either
    I totally agree, yet it seems that this board gets more up in arms over an LPN becoming an RN by any means other than a traditional program that may be seen as some "short cut" (Oh no, not that!!) than a nurse who's English is not even remotely close to understandable to us, let alone a hard of hearing and/or elderly person.

    But then again, it's politically incorrect to say such things and it's much more in style to gloat about:

    1. How hard one's nursing program was
    2. How hard their program was to get into
    3. How long or grilling their clinicals were
    4. How it therefore made them a much better nurse than a graduate from some other program....

    It's funny how some ideas of superiority are considered to be "in style" while others are considerd to be discriminatory and/or closed minded.
  3. by   feltmeyer
    I believe that many LPN programs are wonderful I am completing an LPN to RN bridge program I have learned alot and have found the critical thinking above and beyond that which is taught in LPN is quite a benefit. Actually there are programs out there as long as you have a Bachelor's in anything not necessary to nursing you can go into an accelerated BSN program now to me that is much more terrifying to know that someone is taking care of me is a nurse on paper yet has had no clinical or hands on medical experience at all before they get the BSN
  4. by   luv4nursing
    Quote from cctparamedic
    I Think that paramedics with college back-ground and x-years of experience should be allowed to enter a LPN/LVN to RN class.
    My LPN to RN program accepts Paramedics and Respiratory therapists but they have to have documented clinical experience.

    Many mentioned a transition program should be available, and they are available widely now. There are usually about 6 pre reqs that need to be done before you can apply, but the program itself is one year. The program I am getting ready to start in January at my community college is actually online. We have to go to clinicals once a week for 12 hrs, and the rest is online except for some lab check offs and midterms/finals. It works out well since I would say most who are transitioning probably work and need to be able to continue working...it makes it more convenient bc you can do your school work on ur own time (say for instance at 2am in your underoos if u want! lol)

    I would also like to add that for many LPNs, getting their RN is considered a formality as far as the education/classes required. I have met many LPNs who transitioned to RN and who say they learned absolutlely nothing new. I also compared the NCLEX review books for LPN and RN and they are identical, word for word,page for page except for a section on delegation. Its all the same information that we are required to learn over again, possibly in slightly more detail. I just consider it something that I have to do to get paid more. Ill let you know if my view changes while Im in the program, but that seems to be the general view.
  5. by   mgordonlvn
    This is another area where we are feeding on our own...

    If I, the lowly LVN, can correctly demonstrate to a competent assessor all of the skills that RN students must learn, and pass the NCLEX-RN, then I certainly must possess the knowledge that a formally trained candidate possesses. Regardless of the source of your knowledge...if you know it, you know it.

    :trout: to the person who suggested that RN's should be able to take a test and be doctors. Same principle. If you know it, you had to learn it somewhere. The crap they ask on boards is not stuff you know inately.

    As far as Excelsior goes...I would take someone who demonstrates the discipline to study independently and fulfill all of their requirements(esp. CPNE) before I would trust some suburban housewife who attended the local community college because she was bored...or her husband left her...or whatever other lame scenario you can come up with.



    Is it just me...or do those look like middle fingers?
  6. by   mixyplixy
    Oh come on, if an LVN wants to be an RN, go to school and become one. If an RN wants to be an NP, get the necessary education and degrees. A test of any kind is just a small part of what is necessary. A person has to learn to THINK like an RN, not just know what box to check on the test. Its hard to explain...
  7. by   mgordonlvn
    I maintain: experience is the best teacher.

    I agree that it is soooo much more than checking the right answer box. My point is this: given the choice between a seasoned LVN and a new RN...if my baby's life were at stake, I'd take the LVN.

    I support battlefield promotion, can you tell?
  8. by   futurecnm
    Quote from feltmeyer
    Actually there are programs out there as long as you have a Bachelor's in anything not necessary to nursing you can go into an accelerated BSN program now to me that is much more terrifying to know that someone is taking care of me is a nurse on paper yet has had no clinical or hands on medical experience at all before they get the BSN
    People in accelerated programs do go to clinical like the rest of us in nursing school. It is a very intense program that covers all the info that is in a 2 year program, just condensed into 18 months or something like that. They go over the summer, and other programs don't. They get the same education as a ADN does. I would have gone that route in a second if it hadn't cost 25K. I don't think any nursing programs graduate people with no hands on experience. To be an accredited program, they need a certain amount of clinical time.

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