LOOK the part? - page 4

I know a gal....she has very recently 'changed her look'. She is a ball to be around...everyone around her is comfortable. She is a great nurse, full of positive energy, smart, good to the... Read More

  1. by   hoolahan
    As a new nurse, working nights on a med-surg floor, I once went to work w/o any makeup on. This was in the days that a pt may actually spend a few days in the hospital if ambulatory. We had this one pt on the unit, who stayed up late, he would come to the nurses station after our first rounds for coffee and a smoke w us (yes, we used to be allowed to smoke right at the desk!) He knew me from the other nights I worked. He came up to the desk and said, "Man, you look raw tonight!" My co-workers just loved that and joined right in w him.

    Never went to work w/o makeup again! At least not for many many years. Now I don't wear any b/c it would sweat right off of me outside or in those homes w/o a/c!!

    As for the guys w/o undies, well, saw my share of surgical fellows who in the rush of a code, doing compressions had their scrub pants drop down. Kinda embarassing if you have no undies.

    OK, now for a terrible confession. You have seen those Hanes undie commercials with the two girls judging whether a guy is wearing boxers or briefs, w Micheal Jordan? Well, my friend and I were actually doing that one s-l-o-w day, kinda funny, plus a few other variations we were "checking" for!! LOL!!
  2. by   ERNurse752
    I think I'm going to make a uniform out of Coban and Ace wrap...anyone want to buy one from me?
  3. by   l.rae
    Originally posted by hoolahan
    As a new nurse, working nights on a med-surg floor, I once went to work w/o any makeup on. This was in the days that a pt may actually spend a few days in the hospital if ambulatory. We had this one pt on the unit, who stayed up late, he would come to the nurses station after our first rounds for coffee and a smoke w us (yes, we used to be allowed to smoke right at the desk!) He knew me from the other nights I worked. He came up to the desk and said, "Man, you look raw tonight!" My co-workers just loved that and joined right in w him.

    Never went to work w/o makeup again! At least not for many many years. Now I don't wear any b/c it would sweat right off of me outside or in those homes w/o a/c!!

    As for the guys w/o undies, well, saw my share of surgical fellows who in the rush of a code, doing compressions had their scrub pants drop down. Kinda embarassing if you have no undies.

    OK, now for a terrible confession. You have seen those Hanes undie commercials with the two girls judging whether a guy is wearing boxers or briefs, w Micheal Jordan? Well, my friend and I were actually doing that one s-l-o-w day, kinda funny, plus a few other variations we were "checking" for!! LOL!!

    Hoolihan...you are such a riot...l too remember when you could smoke at the nurses station......gee and it doesn't seem like it was that long ago either.....nowadays....we wouldnn't have time to smoke even if we could..............LOL...LR
  4. by   futureccrn
    At my hospital nurses, aides, unit clerks, and housekeeping staff are pretty much allowed to wear whatever we want regarding scrub attire. No color, print or pattern is banned. Therefore it's hard for a patient, visitor or family member to tell who is who. Sure, we all wear our name badge but the professional designation is very hard to read. I enjoy wearing the Tooniforms made by Cherokee. I especially like the Precious Moments scrubs and have several in my possession.

    I never iron my uniforms either. They are hung dried and then get hung in my closet so there are few wrinkles on them. Never had any manager tell me I HAD to iron my clothes.

    Far as I'm concerned it's not what a Nurse wears, it's how she (or he) does her (or his) job that matters.

    But as for the nurse wearing high heels, how do you run to a code in that?
  5. by   Dr. Kate
    One of the worst days I ever spent in ICU was the one I went to work from school and had forgotten a change of shoes. Don't know why I was wearing shoes that hurt my feet in the first place but by the end of the shift. And those were only 2 inch stack heels.

    I got out of nursing school in the mid 70s and do you guys have any idea how short skirts were then? In those days even wearing a pastel colored, traditionally styled uniform was a radical departure. Scrubs were for when your uniform got so horribly soiled no one wanted you in their company and you had a shift to finish. But back to those skirts--you couldn't even bend over the water fountain without creating a disturbance. But, I sure did learn good body mechanics--had to if I didn't want my RIA hanging out.
  6. by   Rustyhammer
    Originally posted by Dr. Kate

    I got out of nursing school in the mid 70s and do you guys have any idea how short skirts were then?

    Ahhh...those were the days!
  7. by   kmchugh
    I think its important for nurses to look professional, if they want to be taken seriously. That said, what is professional? Shoot, I wear shorts to work, and when I get there, I change into OR scrubs, which are at least as comfortable (and attractive) as pajamas. Nonetheless, I am taken seriously, because I generally don't talk unless I have some idea of what I am talking about. There is a nurse at one of the hospitals I work at who, every day, wears white pants with a belt, button down shirt, and a tie. I don't want to disparage a fellow male nurse, but lets just say he isn't taken as seriously by either his coworkers or physicians. And I am seriously concerned with a nurse working on a busy medical floor, with patients sick with a number of different bugs, including TB, who wears a tie. If it dangles on one patient, then another, what is being passed around? Dress, make up, etc, generally is not as indicative of a health care professional as are knowledge, common sense, and smarts about what one wears, has, and does around patients.

    We have a female physician here in town who is in her 50's, wears short skirts with business blouses and jackets, high heels, and quite a bit of makeup. She has long nails, which are painted, and somewhat "higher than average," bleached hair. Somehow, this topic never seems to get brought up in relation to her. I wonder why that is?

    Kevin McHugh
  8. by   LoisJean
    Nuts!

    I say all nurses ought to work naked. Yes, barea$$ naked. Butt bouncin' naked. I would allow for our compadres in the more frigid climates and suggest perhaps a navy blue or white sweater if it's cold--perhaps the birkie stilettos would go well..(?)- however, we must also remember that name tags should be positioned in an easy to spot area, written on tape- (paper preferred).

    At any rate- if you do happen to have a few wrinkles here or there it would be a good idea to iron them out before going on duty........well, you get my point maybe.

    It's so awfully important that we be distinct from the kitchen staff and such and well I just think naked is the way to go-- besides that, don't you think that it would kind of be a great way for us to like, 'know' each others butt-er--
    scuse me, I meant each other better (watch it, RustyHammer, sir).....and besides all of that, well, every dress code known to institutionalization has been tried out in the clinical setting and no one seems to ever be too happy with any of them and it's so goshdurn important that we be identifiable and I reallly think that nude is the way to achieve that......I'm very serious.

    Besides, who wants to bother with panties anyway.....and cripes, well geez, think of all the convieniences like easy clean up and not having to worry about color schemes and girls, really, we will not have to worry any more if 'our butts look fat in this'. Then, too, good (looking) men like Brian and Rusty (for-instance) well, we wouldn't have to wonder any more about, 'I wonder if he wears his underwear in xtra long'.....

    Just mumbling.....sorry. LoisJean

    By the by, Hoolihan darlin', I look back fondly upon those good old days when us nurses and patients had one good smoke at the nurses station before lights out.
  9. by   mamabear
    Working on a psych unit, we have a bit more latitude as far as clothing is concerned: no blue denim (white, black, or tan is okay), no sleeveless tops, open-toed shoes, hip-huggers, cropped pants (what we used to call pedal pushers [yes, I'm THAT old]), anything with words on it, high-heeled shoes, anything tight/revealing/seductive, minimal make-up, etc.
    For some reason, our dress code emphasizes that all staff must wear stockings/socks
    We're encouraged to wear inexpensive clothing so, if we have to participate in a take-down, we won't worry about ruining a $100.00 sweater

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