It really annoys me when nurses say they are going to go to med school... - page 4

I see a lot of posts by nurses who think they are going to go to med school. A pre-med BS and BSN are totally different school tracks.....if you are an RN, it is almost impossible to move on to med... Read More

  1. by   megank5183
    sorry to offend people so much....it has nothing to do with an inferiority complex, and it's not that i'm thinking about it all the time or 'fretting' about it. it just annoys me to read posts from people annoyed with nursing who flippantly say, i'll go to med school. to say that i have an inferiority complex is to surmise that i think nursing is an inferior profession...which i do not. if you want to go the med school, go for it. it is a non-traditional route to enter med school and will require a lot of make-up courses....people can obvi do whatever they want and I wasn't suggesting otherwise....to cuteandcrazyrn.....i would straight up rather die than go to med school. i like being a nurse. if i could switch to a dream career, i would want to be astronaut or super model
  2. by   LynnLRN
    I know a few docs who were nurses first. So it is not near impossible, plenty of people have done it. I'm sure it is very hard work. Hard work and impossible are 2 different things. It is a hard path to becoming a Dr. regardless of where you start from.
  3. by   wish_me_luck
    Actually, med schools are starting to want something different degree wise than your run of the mill Biology, Chemistry, etc. degree. Those two are higher than a dime a dozen in applying to med school. And everyone gives the same cookie cutter answer of they want to be a doctor to help people.

    I think a BSN would set you apart--it's a degree and all you need after that are the pre-reqs for med school.
  4. by   hiddencatRN
    Quote from megank5183
    A pre-med BS and BSN are totally different school tracks.....if you are an RN, it is almost impossible to move on to med school without getting a totally new bachelor's degree. In fact, as an RN it is almost impossible to become a PA without taking at **** load of new classes. Does this pipe dream annoy anyone else??
    Pre-med is a set of requirements that can be completed with any degree program. I work with doctors that have music degrees and history degrees as well as those who have the more traditional BS hard science degrees. They simply complete the required classes along with the major requirements for the degree. While it would be much harder for a nurse to do that during school, it's not an entire degree's worth of classes that would need to be completed post graduation.

    I imagine folks who plan to go to med school either know this or learn it at some point before applying to med school. Nurses complete Master's programs while working so completing pre-med science classes while working doesn't seem that much crazier to me.

    I'm not sure why you're annoyed. Maybe it is a "pipe dream" for most folks who say they want to go to med school, but even if it is.....so?
  5. by   Bringonthenight
    Ok your right "hate" is a strong word. I'm all about furthering education, but I don't like it when nursing students say they are going straight on to medicine- in doing so making it sound like nursing is a second class MD or something. They don't treat the jobs as separate professions.

    Does that make sense? I guess I just want them to realize the difference and show some respect while they are at it for both nursing and medicine.
  6. by   Racer15
    Not everyone that is a nurse would have to do that much to get into med school. I was pre-vet once upon a time, so I have the chemistry classes, the physics classes, etc. I think I only lack calculus and some organic chemistry, so I'd be looking at one year to get in, if I so desired (which I don't).
  7. by   blueorchid981
    Not impossible. My school actually has a BSN/PreMed track. I thought about doing it before. It doesn't matter what degree you have, as long as you have the med school pre reqs. If anything, I think it gives you an advantage when applying for med school! Doctors who were once nurses are great! Because they know what it's like to be a nurse and more likely to respect us.

    I see nothing wrong with it.
  8. by   amygarside
    i think it's fine for a nurse to go to med school if he/she chooses to change a career.
  9. by   BrandonLPN
    I get why a nurse might become tired of their career and decide to go to med school. If they have the time, money and ability, more power to them.

    But I don't get why someone whose goal is being a MD would begin their education by getting a BSN. That seems like more of an expensive detour than a stepping-stone.
  10. by   teiladay
    Quote from Altra
    I work with physicians whose undergraduate degrees include biology, biochemistry ... and anthropology and French translation. Med school admission requirements are generally 2 semesters each of bio, chem, organic chem, calculus and physics. If you complete those it doesn't particularly matter what your degree is in.
    ... The cold reality however, is that for most nurses (or most people for that matter) to even come close to completing the requisite science courses, they will pretty much complete a science based degree program just in trying to meet the prerequisites so they can even *take* the requisite courses

    Sure, a school might say you need organic chem, but the course guide might say you have to have general chemistry before you can take org chem... the prerequisite for gen chem is pre-calc (at the least) at a lot of schools. See where I'm going?

    That's just to meet the minimums. To be competitive, schools might "recommend" (often code for "take these courses") that you have courses in genetics, immunology, etc.. Next thing you know, you've basically completed the pre-med undergrad degree in your pursuit of being competitive. Don't forget you're competing with people who are able to easily get a 3.8 hard math/hard science GPA on a bad day.

    The bottom line is that med school is an entirely different ball of wax, fiercely competitive on a different level, but not out of reach to anyone who is able to digest the math and science requirements, score high on the MCAT, etc.

    I think the OP is generally speaking about people who really don't have a clue what applying to med and other "professional schools" entails. [in this context, degrees/ licenses that requiring the completion of a graduate level program or better as a minimum; e.g. PharmD, Optometrist, Podiatrist, Vet medicine, Path assistant, etc.]

    I wish everyone the best with whatever dream they have. I also like when people are realistic and knowledgeable about their dream occupation.

    Best of the morning to everyone!
  11. by   SaoirseRN
    Why should it bother you? Some people go into nursing for whatever reasons, and realize they would like to become physicians. Others maybe wanted to do nursing first. No, it isn't "medicine" but one cannot say that nursing and medicine are completely unrelated.

    Med school is hard no matter where you start. Others have said that doctors who were nurses are some of the better ones to work with and they are not wrong. It isn't fair to call another's dream a "pipe dream" simply because they started on a different track.
  12. by   samist
    Quote from teiladay

    ... The cold reality however, is that for most nurses (or most people for that matter) to even come close to completing the requisite science courses, they will pretty much complete a science based degree program just in trying to meet the prerequisites so they can even *take* the requisite courses

    Sure, a school might say you need organic chem, but the course guide might say you have to have general chemistry before you can take org chem... the prerequisite for gen chem is pre-calc (at the least) at a lot of schools. See where I'm going?

    That's just to meet the minimums. To be competitive, schools might "recommend" (often code for "take these courses") that you have courses in genetics, immunology, etc.. Next thing you know, you've basically completed the pre-med undergrad degree in your pursuit of being competitive. Don't forget you're competing with people who are able to easily get a 3.8 hard math/hard science GPA on a bad day.

    The bottom line is that med school is an entirely different ball of wax, fiercely competitive on a different level, but not out of reach to anyone who is able to digest the math and science requirements, score high on the MCAT, etc.

    I think the OP is generally speaking about people who really don't have a clue what applying to med and other "professional schools" entails. [in this context, degrees/ licenses that requiring the completion of a graduate level program or better as a minimum; e.g. PharmD, Optometrist, Podiatrist, Vet medicine, Path assistant, etc.]

    I wish everyone the best with whatever dream they have. I also like when people are realistic and knowledgeable about their dream occupation.

    Best of the morning to everyone!
    Actually the minimum requirement for nursing includes general chemistry and biology. Your second biology course could be any of the other biology courses you took for your prerequisites. So long as they are the standard courses not the "chemistry for allied health students," etc. And no those prerequisite courses are meant to be essentially finished in 2 years time, that is nothing like completing another science degree program. I don't know too many people that are taking college level pre-calc, normally the academic institution would make you take a math placement test.

    I've heard of people getting into med school with degrees that aren't science based. They honestly look for your involvement in the community, shadowing, research, MCATs, and of course they look at GPA. Those buffer course they suggest you take to "enhance your chances" are essentially your choice. Those really don't do much for your chances to get into Med school. Many of those hard science applicants with a 3.8 GPA don't get in even with good LORs, pre-med committee recommendations, MCATs,shadowing experience, and research with publications. Math and physics degree, now that's a different matter.

    I've taken the prereqs for the professional programs and considered applying to professional schools. They aren't as bad as everyone thinks they are.

    I think being a nurse would set you apart from other applicants. I mean degrees in bio, chem, etc aren't a walk in the park (I would know) but your career as a nurse would show your initiative to want to learn more and want to be a better health care provider especially since you have patient care experience.

    My question to anyone here is the BSN considered an actual bachelors degree or is it another professional degree like the others?
  13. by   PacoUSA
    Doesn't bother me at all. If you want to pursue your dreams, shoot for the stars.

close