Is buying a present for a pt. appropriate? - page 2

I have this one pt. who I really like very much. He is an about 80 y.o. quad on a vent and has been in the facility for years. His mind is so sharp and he so hungry for company, conversation and any... Read More

  1. by   truern
    Your heart is definately in the right place

    What possible harm could come from buying the Bible on tape or CD so he can listen?? Maybe you could "donate" it to the facility, but leave it in his room??
  2. by   Daytonite
    Go for it! If this is a gift from your heart and not meant to have any strings attached, I don't see a problem with it. I've had my share of patients over the years who I've gifted with some little thing or two. Since he's a quad perhaps something on tape or disc would be good for him. Books on tape (http://www.booksontape.com/index.cfm) rents all kinds of books for 30 days at a time for the same cost of actually buying a book. They have a awesome library of titles in the thousands. Their books are unabridged and often read by celebrities. I used to rent a good mystery to listen to when I had to drive across the country. Some of the books I rented were 15 hours long! If your facility offers satellite radio perhaps you could pay for a month of satellite radio service. XM has some channels designed for the older population. My mom listens to the old radio show station all the time. Best thing is there are no commercials! Their website is http://www.xmradio.com/index.jsp. Just a small radio with earphones might be something he could make use of as well. Those are just a few things I can think of that might make good gifts for a quad.
  3. by   ShayRN
    I have bought snacks, drinks, newspapers and magazines for my patients that didn't have money on them. My last manager paid to have a dear elderly patient's hair done. I may be a nurse, but I am human first. If I see a need that is easily fixed, I fix it. I don't think it would hurt at all to buy him a bible.
  4. by   NRSKarenRN
    In this situation, totally appropriate to give this patient a gift. Since he is a quad on a vent, I agree that books on tape type purchase might be more appropriate.

    Our local library loans out books on tape---see if your local library does too. That way, you could purchase tape recorder device, he could listen bible tapes. By getting additional tapes from the library, iit could be a "gift that keeps on giving".




    :kiss For thinking of meeting a patient's spiritual and emotional needs in an "out of the box" way.
  5. by   crb613
    I am currently a student and am being taught no to gifts of any kind regardless of the reason. We are instead being taught to spend some time w/pt reading to them or talking ect. I think its a nice idea......just letting you know what my school says.
  6. by   LisaRn21
    Here's my thought.

    I work in pediatrics lol and if I didn't take the gifts some of these kids bring in or make for their nurses would break their hearts. I always accept the gift (obviosly something they made in the play room or colored or found in the gift shop really cheap nothing extravagant) but I also give a xmas present (something very small like a teddy bear or something) to those speical patients if they are in on the holidays. We have the same kids over and over again and I could not imagine not being a part of their life, I think to be a pediatric nurse you have to mendle in the lives of the kids...there is no way around it!
  7. by   estrogen
    Quote from joyflnoyz
    You could send it through the mail, anon, or another good idea might be to have someone from from your church visit him and bring it to him.
    Sending it through the mail is a good idea. I'm currently not a church member.
  8. by   estrogen
    The books on tape are a great idea.

    Someone asked how he reads if he's a quad. He has a kind of a "book stand" that goes on his bed side table. He asks us to pull the bedside table over his bed and to put the head of his bed up. Then he just asks someone to turn the page as we go in and out of his room. He only has a couple books of psalms and some other lithurgicals scripts that he reads over and over.
  9. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    How sweet of you!
    I have given gifts on several occasions (I work in an LTC facility so I get to know my residents well.) I have given books, magazines, etc. We had several transfers from the New Orleans area, and I helped them out- one sweet LOL who had no family and lost the possesions she did have, I bought her a pair of slippers and a warm robe and she was so moved that she cried...
    I would not advertise to the other residents about the gift, but I see no problem with it whatsoever. God bless you for being so kind.

    Lori
  10. by   rouqie
    I have to agree that it's a good idea but I am nurse who has been in trouble more then a few time for unproffessionalism. I think that if you leave the book in his room and don't tell him who it's from that would be the best. Also the idea of giving him a bible might not be a good idea. I have nothing against church or bibles. But most places frown on nurses pushing their religious beliefs on to their patients. I'm not saything that you do, but from your nursing supervisors position you giving a religious gift might not send the signal that you want to send. I would leave the book for him and not tell him who it's from. That way if anything happens to the book the patient won't associate you with book. I also think that if he likes to read to get him hooked up with a libary somewhere. you buying him books every so often could get expensive. The patient might also feel guilty for having you do things for him because he may regaurd you as a friend now and not as a nurse.
  11. by   Cute_CNA
    It is a nice thought, but not a good idea. Don't.
  12. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    I'm actually the house supervisor for my LTC facility, and there's never been a problem. Even our CNAs will pick up trinkets for some of the residents on occasion, and actually there are signs posted by management for gifts to be given to residents for Christmas. Check with your supervisor, see what he or she thinks.

    Also, the concept of pushing religious beliefs on people (proselytizing, right?) doesn't apply here... he has religious ties and literature. We provide bibles to residents who would like them, churches in the area donate them. We also have church services available for anyone who chooses to worship. As long as a bible fits with his religious beliefs, there should not be any problem with it.
  13. by   rn/writer
    Quote from rouqie
    I have to agree that it's a good idea but I am nurse who has been in trouble more then a few time for unproffessionalism. I think that if you leave the book in his room and don't tell him who it's from that would be the best. Also the idea of giving him a bible might not be a good idea. I have nothing against church or bibles. But most places frown on nurses pushing their religious beliefs on to their patients. I'm not saything that you do, but from your nursing supervisors position you giving a religious gift might not send the signal that you want to send. I would leave the book for him and not tell him who it's from. That way if anything happens to the book the patient won't associate you with book. I also think that if he likes to read to get him hooked up with a libary somewhere. you buying him books every so often could get expensive. The patient might also feel guilty for having you do things for him because he may regaurd you as a friend now and not as a nurse.
    If he's reading Psalms and liturgical items, she wouldn't be promoting her own religious beliefs but rather giving him more of his own.

    To address the objections of others, there's a big difference between giving a gift to someone in an acute care setting and giving one to someone who is a resident in LTC. If you wanted to do something nice for a patient in a hospital, you could, perhaps, do something for them outside the facility, but how do you manage that when your work place is where the man lives?

    I'd suggest a couple of things. First, speak with your manager about maybe getting the local library to provide shut-in service to the entire facility. This would benefit not only your gentleman but the other residents as well. You could, of course, whisper in his ear that he inspired the idea.

    If the library doesn't have such a service, contact area churches, scout troops, vets organizations, frat or sorority houses, and other groups who might be looking for a worthwhile service project. Suggest that they collect donated books and magazines on a regular basis--say, quarterly--and bring fresh reading materials in for all the residents.

    And third, if you are still so inclined and your manager has no objection, bring in the Bible for your resident, but come in on your own time and dressed in street clothes. This ought to serve as a demarcation between your professional role and your personal one and say to him that you see him as a friend as well as a resident.

    As I said earlier, when you are speaking about residents in LTC, you have to take into account that you are working in the only home they now have. Just as you would have the option to visit any person in their place of residence, you can come to see him as if he lived in an apartment building.

    I find it hard to believe that anyone with even a sliver of a heart would begrudge an 80-year-old man a bit of affection and attention.

    I commend your for your caring spirit.

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