How has nursing changed you? - page 5

I definitely don't feel like the same person I was, years ago, before I started going to nursing school and working in healthcare. How has nursing changed you?... Read More

  1. by   hppygr8ful
    I wouldn't say nursing has changed me. Growing up on the farm I was always to one to bring home the bird with a broken wing and nurses all the sick animals back to health when we couldn't afford to have a vet out. I resisted going to nursing school for years but finally relented and I have to say that nursing has allowed me to be the best person I am capable of being.

    Hppy
  2. by   KarenMS
    I'm an atheist and this whole thread is confusing to me. Since when is saying something about god near a non-believer "imposing beliefs?" People pray for me....whatever...they're not making ME pray or making ME observe.
  3. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from KarenMS
    I'm an atheist and this whole thread is confusing to me. Since when is saying something about god near a non-believer "imposing beliefs?" People pray for me....whatever...they're not making ME pray or making ME observe.
    What is missing here is that the person being prayed over is unable to declined this service. When you do not know what a person's faith is or if they have no faith/religion at all. You should not impose your faith on them. In the instance cited the man was comatose and the OP whispered in his ear ""You may not be here much longer, but you will look presentable and respectable for your family. I will not let you be seen without your dignity and honor. You must endure this for them. We are men; we put our faith in God." the use of the word we assumed that the patient is a believer in God. Even a believer might have a problem being prayed over. My own late grandfather was Irish and about as Catholic as one could get but a long illness with Lou Gehrig's disease left him profoundly angry with God. In his final days he was in and out of consciousness. My grandmother asked a priest to come administer last rights. When the priest arrived and began to anoint my grandfather he suddenly woke up and screamed get the F^&& away from me. I want nothing to do with this God I've been praying to for years. This illness is the thanks I get!" If you feel the need to pray for someone do it in the locker room. Not standing over a dying patient.

    Peace

    Hppy
  4. by   Knotanoonurse
    Quote from KelRN215
    I am more jaded, cynical and an Atheist now.
    I can understand your POV. Yes some patients harden you BUT what has done me in is the ruthless lying manager I had and her Director and VP. She was a total narcissist , but was labeled a golden girl. Her cute tricks included hiring her bestie from another hospital over a well qualified current employee. Bestie turned on her. She also had affairs with both a permanent CIO and interim CEO. She called herself RNC but was not actually certified. Also pulled out her daughter's prenatal, read aloud, and complained about how irresponsible it was for her daughter to be pregnant.

    I worked at a different hospital and had a staff nurse lie on an incident report about an error she made and tried to blame me for. I guess she did not realize I reviewed all of the incident reports. She just got a little talking to and when she cried the unit manager gave her a hug and no punishment or write up. So much for integrity. I am a bit cynical now!
    Last edit by Knotanoonurse on Feb 6
  5. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Quote from KarenMS
    I'm an atheist and this whole thread is confusing to me. Since when is saying something about god near a non-believer "imposing beliefs?" People pray for me....whatever...they're not making ME pray or making ME observe.
    I think if you are laying there dying and cannot tell the zealot to get lost you are a captive audience. This is the very definition of being a captive audience and having beliefs imposed on you. Forcing a dying patient to be subject to this bizarre, unprofessional conduct when he is in no position to stop it or report it. I wonder how many fully cognizant patients are subject to this abuse. I bet a whole lot less because its indefensible and an offense that would lead to termination where I work & that's as it should be.
    Last edit by SpankedInPittsburgh on Feb 7
  6. by   Crush
    Quote from RNrhythm
    Just the usual stuff:
    • I look at my friends and families and see chronic conditions starting and wonder how it will end.
    • I am very protective of my mobility.
    • I look at my spouse and think of all the things that I have seen and want to spare us from as we age.
    • My words are optimistic but my thoughts are very pragmatic.
    • I have become somewhat utilitarian in my clothing and nutrition.
    • I am wary of excess sugar in my diet.
    • I care about organs, like pancreas and kidneys, that I never thought about before.
    • I am grateful that I live a life free of pain.
    • I am grateful for the affection, support, and humor of my loved ones. Some people are so alone.
    • I am grateful that my mind is clear and I am not at war with myself.
    Absolutely. I would add that I find more and more that I am so grateful for the little things in life and the people in my life.
    Nursing has made me more aware of how I take care of or don't take care of myself as well.


    A word on the topic of comatose patients. I still recall a person ( I was a tech at the time ) who woke up from a coma and told us all about our family, love life, gossip, etc. that staff had discussed in the pts room while providing care. While not every detail was remembered by the pt, it was enough to be etched in my mind.
    Last edit by Crush on Feb 7
  7. by   BCgradnurse
    Quote from EGspirit
    For the record, I hope my patient was able to hear me. I doubt it, but I hope so. I did my best for him and his family, and my best is something I have always had a very good reputation for as a nurse, even among people who didn't like me. Keep in mind, the reason I did all that I did for him was because a bunch of lazy nurses before me never did--probably atheists.

    So, my best comes with my religious convictions. The only reason I'm a nurse and not an accountant is because of my religious convictions. I have had so many dying patients. I have been on so many codes. When you've walked a mile in my shoes then I might listen to you. I loved my patient as I love myself. I did unto him, as I would have it done unto me. That's what my best comes with. And I can tell you right now, he was lucky I was his nurse. He never regained consciousness. He died. But when his family came to see him, he looked dignified instead of disheveled. He was clean, orderly, smelled good, and looking at peace.

    Judge me? Go judge yourself.

    I was his nurse. He was my patient. He couldn't do for himself, so I did for him. And if the worst thing he had to endure was my statement of faith meant to encourage him and give him strength, then he got off pretty easy. He was an old man, a vet, he raised a family. I doubt he was offended by my comments--and I hope that he did hear them.
    Your religious convictions should never come into play when caring for a patient. You've made it about you, and not the patient. Your intentions may be good, but it's insensitive, selfish, and plain unprofessional to start whispering your convictions in a comatose patient's ear behind a closed door. Would you do this in front of family or other staff? My guess would be no. You may say it's because you don't want to be judged, but I would guess that you know it's wrong, and you don't want witnesses.

    What you are doing is a fireable offense. Worse than that, it is taking advantage of someone who does not have the ability to refuse your proselytizing. I would certainly report you or anyone else doing this, regardless of religion.
  8. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    YEP!!! BC said it all!!!
  9. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from EGspirit
    Keep in mind, the reason I did all that I did for him was because a bunch of lazy nurses before me never did--probably atheists.

    Judge me? Go judge yourself.
    It would seem you are doing a bit of judging yourself doesn't it?

    Quote from EGspirit
    He couldn't do for himself, so I did for him.

    I did unto him, as I would have it done unto me.
    Are you sure this man was a practicing Christian? You state you took care of him more than once, did you have a conversation with him about his faith, his wishes? Or did you have that conversation with his family? Are you confident that what you did "for him" was something he wanted for himself?

    I am sure that you would be fine then with a Muslim (of Hindu, or Jewish, or Shinto, or Athiest, or any other religion) nurse do thins to you while unconscious, correct?


    Quote from EGspirit
    And I can tell you right now, he was lucky I was his nurse.
    Do you ever consider in your practice if the thing you do are in your own best interest or the patients?
  10. by   KelRN215
    Quote from Knotanoonurse
    I can understand your POV. Yes some patients harden you BUT what has done me in is the ruthless lying manager I had and her Director and VP. She was a total narcissist , but was labeled a golden girl. Her cute tricks included hiring her bestie from another hospital over a well qualified current employee. Bestie turned on her. She also had affairs with both a permanent CIO and interim CEO. She called herself RNC but was not actually certified. Also pulled out her daughter's prenatal, read aloud, and complained about how irresponsible it was for her daughter to be pregnant.

    I worked at a different hospital and had a staff nurse lie on an incident report about an error she made and tried to blame me for. I guess she did not realize I reviewed all of the incident reports. She just got a little talking to and when she cried the unit manager gave her a hug and no punishment or write up. So much for integrity. I am a bit cynical now!
    It's not so much my patients that have done this but the situations they have ended up in. I wrote a post some years back about how nursing has turned me into a non-believer. It was about a child I cared for who lived in a neglectful situation and child protective service's refusal to do anything, even after repeated reports. I don't believe that an all-powerful and all-good being would ever leave a child in such a situation therefore I do not believe that such a being exists.
  11. by   SaltineQueen
    It's made me much more anxious when my children are sick. I tend to think the worst...
  12. by   maxthecat
    I'm more open minded but also more cynical. You wouldn't think these two states could co-exist, but they do in me.
  13. by   Have Nurse
    Your article touched me. Thank you for writing.

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