Home med lists make me crazy. - page 5

by imintrouble

5,936 Views | 46 Comments

I hate home med lists. Hate, hate, hate them. They come up from the ER with no dosages, no routes, and no correct name. "Stool softener" is not an approved med name. The ER MD checks all the boxes to continue, and I know he/she... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from sissiesmama
    Working in the ER, the home med list was always a pain in the butt. After I started having health issues I wanted to make sure I wasnt one of "those patients". I used my iphone to list my meds on the "notes" app and made a pic. Printed it out, and my docs and the ER staff when I have to go love it.

    Anne, RNC

    Ugh!!

    I work in peds and every now and then will have patients whose parents bring in typed up home med lists, alphabetized by generic med name, with complete dosage info, etc. [ side note: I ADORE THESE FAMILIES] These are literally PERFECT lists... Extra copies printed out and all with patient's name, DOB, etc (and they usually will also have a second list of "Meds By Time of Day" as well...).

    And despite their complete preparedness, the orders are not entered correctly!! It's beyond me how this happens! It's not just one of the meds is timed incorrectly--that I can understand. The problems I see are with DOSE or FREQUENCY or only a few of the meds being entered!

    I've spent over 2 hrs fixing and correcting the PTA Med Lists before...Why should this child have to miss his or her meds because he was admitted to the hospital?


    ***And the worst was the time I'd called the doc to discuss the med rec... He responded "Oh yea, I heard in report that this kid's meds are probably entered all wrong".... REALLY? Ugh!!!
    imintrouble likes this.
  2. 1
    [QUOTE=mbg18;7273679]Ugh!!

    I work in peds and every now and then will have patients whose parents bring in typed up home med lists, alphabetized by generic med name, with complete dosage info, etc. [ side note: I ADORE THESE FAMILIES] These are literally PERFECT lists... Extra copies printed out and all with patient's name, DOB, etc (and they usually will also have a second list of "Meds By Time of Day" as well...).

    And despite their complete preparedness, the orders are not entered correctly!! It's beyond me how this happens! It's not just one of the meds is timed incorrectly--that I can understand. The problems I see are with DOSE or FREQUENCY or only a few of the meds being entered!

    I've spent over 2 hrs fixing and correcting the PTA Med Lists before...Why should this child have to miss his or her meds because he was admitted to the hospital?


    Personally I love med lists that are like the ones above. I use Microsoft Rcvr in a table format and tons of columns for listing generic and patent names, dose and proper routs.

    Then i insert another table with my medical hx into a handy dandy table arranged buy earlier childhood Diseases and work it up as times passes

    My husband has chronic resp and heart issues and I u the syustem. He got awesome compliments from the ER and ICU,

    My DaD is 84 YO and I have trained him to sat nothing without the magic list and say he wants me to be MPOA.

    My method works, I havent seen even one med error. Knocking on wood.
    imintrouble likes this.
  3. 2
    We always tell our parents to throw all the mess in a bag or keep a list of them in their wallet. Some I our kids are on as many Meds as an old person!
    tewdles and imintrouble like this.
  4. 3
    I like it when no one reconciles the meds on day shift, or evening shift, and then leaves it for us at night! Yeah I'm really going to call the doc at 0200 to order all 30 of the patient's vitamins! Why could this not have been done earlier? Like, DURING the actual admission??!?
    newkidnurse, tewdles, and imintrouble like this.
  5. 3
    The home med lists. The worst part of an admit.
    tewdles, imintrouble, and applewhitern like this.
  6. 3
    After reading other people's responses, such as those that say the pharmacy dept. pitches in with the med-rec, the more upset I get! Here, it is all on the nurse, period. I have actually been reamed by management because a patient gave me a bottle of medication that she no longer takes. At the time, she acted as if she still used it (this was a "once per month" med) and did not correct me when I was writing it down. At the time of her discharge, she said she no longer takes it, so I got in trouble for putting it on her admission med-rec. Maybe I am wrong, but I thought the whole point of the med-rec was to help avoid mistakes. If a patient hands me the bottle, it has a current date, and I enter it on the computer, and the patient does not tell me she no longer takes it, am I supposed to read her mind? They come in sick, short of breath, etc., and can easily tell me the wrong thing. Again, I thought the whole point was to correct their meds prior to discharging them home. Why doesn't their doctor handle this? I am neither an MD or a pharmacist. Thanks for letting me vent!
    tewdles, imintrouble, and wooh like this.
  7. 1
    We do our best to get the med rec done in the er. We use surescripts. 3rs party real time download from participating pharmacies and all pharmacies in our area participate. Doesn't work for snf or the va but otherwise, if you fill a rx, we can download it.
    imintrouble likes this.


Top