help me buck the system, please! super-traditional pinning ceremony that nobody wants - page 12

Hi all- I'm posting this in the general discussion rather than the student discussion, as I want to hear from people who were successful in doing something like this. I'm the president of my... Read More

  1. by   Todie
    VERY Well said, I couldn't agree with you more..I see other post where people are making a Big stink about it just because they are having it at a Church...Its not about where the ceremony is held, its about what the ceremony stands for.
    Quote from CCU NRS
    First Bravo for sticking up for our past counter parts, just because Nuns became nurses doesn't meant they were less professional and most likely more professionall and for that matter holisitic before holisitic care was even a theory.

    Catholic Nursing schools DO NOT take only nuns I work at a Catholice facility that used to be a school and many of the nurses that have been there for >20years actually attended school there. They are all very competent, professional, intelligent and caring nurses.

    Yes by all means why shouldn't we make sure that the rest of the world feels like we are just trained monkeys wearing Teddy Bears, and Balloons on our scrubs.

    Tradition has it's purposes I believe. I feel that one of those purposes is to help students understand the gravity of the nursing profession, some things should not be frivolous, some things should be conducted with an air of dignity and propriety.

    As for being held in a Church I guess that could be construed as wrong by some but if you are graduating from a nursing program you should be mature enough to be able to separate your beleif's from those of others and you should also be open minded enough to be able to conform to the will of others on such small points afterall you may have Pts in the future that will ask you to pray with them, will you turn your back on them, IF you are secure in your own belief why should just entering a Church or attending a ceremnoy in a Church be so offensive, many people who are devout Christians go to many ceremonies in many other places than Churches and do not make it out to be a big conspiracy designed to undermine their beliefs.

    Again just my 2cents.
  2. by   jerseyRN
    For graduation, we wore white dresses (now in my Halloween costume collection) and caps, and at the end of the ceremony, we had to form two facing lines and hold up our long-stemmed red roses while our classmates exited by walking under the canopy of roses. Argh.......

    And in case you think this is ancient history, the year was 2000!

    p.s. and it was at a church, too.
  3. by   gwenith
    Aussie outsider here but I have to ask

    Why are you not having an Academic ceremony complete with mortar board and robes???

    Geez even for my undergrad diploma I got that much!!

    I personally would be screaming for an academic style ceremony as to do otherwise simply underscores that nurses are "different" and not professionals.
  4. by   Todie
    She also, several times, throughout the posting stated her own opinion on the matter. And not attending a pinning ceremony b/c of a dress...hmmm !!!!!! .But, thats her opinion,and she's entitled to it. But maybe, just maybe, if we cared as much about the really important things as we do about smaller things the world would be a much better place.

    Quote from Mystery5
    Dear Todie,


    She already said that because she is class president, she feels obligated to stick up for the general wishes of those who elected her.

    Dear Rachel,
    Great thread you started. It's fun to read everyone's comments. I don't blame you for hating the caps, after having to wear them to clinicals! Maybe you can find a nice Jewish attorney to accompany you to discuss the matter with administration.:chuckle

    Don't forget my advise ACLU !

    Sincerely, Jan
  5. by   Mystery5
    Quote from jerseyRN
    For graduation, we wore white dresses (now in my Halloween costume collection) and caps, and at the end of the ceremony, we had to form two facing lines and hold up our long-stemmed red roses while our classmates exited by walking under the canopy of roses. Argh.......

    And in case you think this is ancient history, the year was 2000!

    p.s. and it was at a church, too.
    Hey, You just gave me an idea! I need to find my cap and dress for next Halloween!!!
  6. by   Mystery5
    Quote from Todie
    She also, several times, throughout the posting stated her own opinion on the matter. And not attending a pinning ceremony b/c of a dress...hmmm !!!!!! .But, thats her opinion,and she's entitled to it. But maybe, just maybe, if we cared as much about the really important things as we do about smaller things the world would be a much better place.
    Dear Todie,
    If you read all the posts in this thread, you'll see that I personally would never make a stink about this. In my class we voted and I voted for caps, because I like the tradition aspect of them. But, if I had been forced to wear them for clinicals, I might have a different attitude.:chuckle
  7. by   Mystery5
    Quote from gwenith
    Aussie outsider here but I have to ask

    Why are you not having an Academic ceremony complete with mortar board and robes???

    Geez even for my undergrad diploma I got that much!!

    I personally would be screaming for an academic style ceremony as to do otherwise simply underscores that nurses are "different" and not professionals.
    At my school (College of the Desert, in Palm Desert, Calif) the pinning and the school graduation ceremony were entirely separate. Most of us attended the pinning ceremony, but quite a few skipped the graduation ceremony, probably because it was only an ADN degree.
  8. by   Todie
    Very well said !!!!!!!!!!!!
    Quote from LPNtoRN
    Well, there is no such thing as separation of church and state, nor was there anything saying there should be (and this is coming from someone who is not religious at all).

    We held our pinning ceremony in a church and were given little white Bibles. It wasn't a big deal.

    You should just focus on graduating and being happy about that. The pinning ceremony is like high school graduation, it doesn't make a dimes worth of difference in the long run how you picked up your diploma.
  9. by   rnparrot
    with my pinning ceremony, we had it at a catholic church, it was a beautiful church, and while i am not catholic, it didn't matter to me. as for what to wear, we were allowed to wear anything that was a white uniform. whether a dress, shirt and pants, skirt and top. all had to have white shoes and white stockings. we didn't look like a class full of clones all wearing the same thing. the most special part of the ceremony was when we had a special person in our life that placed the pin on us. i had my husband come up with my 2 young kids, and had my son "pin" me. my husband was so proud of me, and i was so proud of having my kids take part in my ceremony.

    we also had a separate graduation ceremony at school. wearing the caps and gowns.

    interesting, i wanted to have a cap from my nursing school, just to have one, i would NEVER wear it though. i just thought to carry on tradition, that graduating nurses should have their nursing school cap. i brought it up and i was turned down very stearnly because caps give the wrong meaning...we are not handmaidens anymore...is what i was told. so i lost that one.

    i don't think you should be worrying about the dress you wear or where the ceremony is being held. i felt having it in a church, that i was being blessed as a nurse, even tho there was no religious aspects of the ceremony. so maybe suggest about having family pin you or some special part of the ceremony that you will always remember.

    good luck. in the end it won't matter, 'cause you will wear different clothes to work, and like alot of rn's you will keep your pin at home so it doesn't get lost. enjoy the day no matter what, don't miss the pinning.

  10. by   Armenurs
    undefinedundefinedundefined
    Quote from rach_nc_03
    begalli,
    i attended an adn pinning ceremony in pinehurst, nc. it was the same as what you have described. all of the girls had to wear dresses and everyone paid the 65 dollars for the pin.
    i also graduated in nc. we requested that everyone where the clinical uniform (the instructors wanted white dresses, but most of us could not afford it) and we chose the pin of our choice- most chose a 10 dollar pin from the local uniform store that had "rn" on it. we did however have to buy the "lamp" for the ceremony-but we talked the nursing faculty into allowing us to pick the lamps at the last minute-and we chose ones with a small candle and had our year and names engraved on the ceramic lamp- for less than 15 dollars (the ones the faculty wanted were an additional 50 dollars!).
    all in all- i would not miss the pinning ceremony for anything- and i had been a military lpn for over 10 years and had worked the civilain side of the house for several years also.
    come up with several ideas- poll the class- and turn those ideas in for discussion. i think the clinical uniform would be great- guys and gals usually wear the same in most programs now, and that adds a degree of uniformity.
    the hats? don't fuss it~there are actually hospitals now that required the nurses to wear them and the ribbon on the hat tells if they are adn, diploma, bsn, or msn, or uap.
    good luck!

    i like the fact that each class at your school planned their own ceremony. the ironic thing about our ceremony is that each class pays for the ceremony of the class ahead of them...we were required to have a fundraiser last year- we raised almost $2,200, which is a lot for such a small group- and paid for the ceremony for the graduating class of 2004. (they didn't have any say in the ceremony, either).

    you bring up a good talking point for my proposal- the students are paying for the ceremony out of pocket, albeit a year early.

    we also have to purchase our own pins, and i'm seriously considering not buying one. they're $65, and they have the year the program was founded (1989), not my graduating year. no personalized engraving, no nothing. maybe this is 'traditional', but i have a tough time swallowing that amount of money for a pin that says 1989 on it. i'm paying my own tuition, fees, etc, and working full-time...i have major surgery coming up over spring break, and i'm in the process of leaving my husband and getting my own place. i do *not* have $65 to throw away on a pin that will, most likely, never come out of the box after the ceremony.

    another poster suggested graduation gowns....i think that would serve exactly the same purpose, and can be rented cheaply. (for the vast majority of us, *anything* cheaper is better!)

    thanks for all your great suggestions...it's wonderful to get a different perspective on these things, since sometimes you can be too close to a situation to see it clearly.
  11. by   rach_nc_03
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    has op ascertained that the other 'available' places are really available and not booked up or too expensive??? it is considered cute to assume that a conservative person is out to cram their ideas down someone else's throat...this is not the truth but it gives a aura of correct behavior vaudavillian use to wrap themselves in the american flag to get applause...now the clinch word is separateion of church and state...
    i have attended classes in churches where a room had been rented...everyone was motivated by the discussion at hand and not on what the rest of the building was for.
    or how well clothed the statue of Jesus was...it he was presented in a tux what differance would that have made
    I haven't gotten offended by the people who say I'm being silly, or petty, or should shut up and be happy, even though I strongly disagree with them. I am, however, getting really p***ed that people are making assumptions about what I've investigated, and what I know/don't know about available space for the pinning. Ask, don't make assumptions.

    THE SCHOOL AUDITORIUM IS AVAILABLE AND FREE. Do you think I would've brought this issue up without knowing that?

    By the way, my initial plan was to ignore the fact that it's in a church, though I disagree with it on principle, and worry about changing the dress code- I thought I was the only person who had the opinion about the church. However, several people came to me in clinicals and specifically said they had a problem with it, and would be boycotting the ceremony because of it.

    And before you start blasting me about my problems with the building, read my countless other posts- clarifications- stating that my problem is with the religious overtones of the ceremony, not simply the location. My college singing group rehearsed in a church. We were allowed to use the space either by paying rent, or by having a few members volunteer to sing in the choir. We took a vote every year, and if anyone wanted to do the choir, they could. If no one did, we paid. I didn't think i'd die from being in a church (did you read my other posts that said I've worked for several churches?). In fact, I don't remember saying *anything* specific about my religious beliefs. I'm talking specifically about my political beliefs here.

    A lot of people have disagreed with me here, and that's to be expected when you don't follow the majority opinion. Many of those have had intelligent discourse with me on their reasons, and in the end, even some of the people who disagreed most strongly had useful suggestions.

    If you feel like making a personal attack on me because i believe this is a violation of church/state separation (the prayer and religious content of the ceremony of a state school), please, PM me and stop wasting the thread space. At least we can avoid this back-and-forth stuff, and I won't have to wade through 20 messages of 'you're being stupid', 'no, she's not' before I find a suggestion from someone on how to deal with a problem- the UNIFORMS, remember?- that the class is in total agreement on.

    Sorry for the rant, I'm just sick of the personal attacks with absolutely no useful suggestions. And if you *do* want to attack me and want to do it publicly in this thread, rather than via PM, do me a favor and read everything I've written in the thread, ok?
  12. by   CrunchRN
    Rachel,

    As I said before (a gazillion post ago) - you all earned and pay for this ceremony. It should be what you graduates want it to be. Good luck with your cause, and I really think you are supported by the majority. Keep on working for what you want.
  13. by   rach_nc_03
    it is considered cute to assume that a conservative person is out to cram their ideas down someone else's throat...this is not the truth but it gives a aura of correct behavior vaudavillian use to wrap themselves in the american flag to get applause...
    Again with the assumptions....I'm the one who spent two years in this program, and I think I'm a little more qualified to ascertain whether this self-described traditionalist and conservative evangelical (his words) is trying to ram his ideas down my throat. He's said on multiple occasions, 'in my program, you'll do as I say!'. He's also said things like 'women aren't cut out for management'. He frequently screams at students who dare to disagree with him. I have personally worked hard to cultivate a good relationship- a professional, respectful one- with him, through hard work, tact, and diplomacy. Most of my classmates won't say anything because they're scared he'll kick them out (it's happened before).

    I think it's more apt to say that it's considered acceptable for someone conservative to attack anyone with liberal political leanings, especially in the current political clime in america. If you had all the facts, and still felt so strongly, I wouldn't be quite so angry- but i despise it when people decide that their *opinions* are somehow more valid than the facts at hand- even before they've been given those facts.

close