Foul Speaking Nurse.............. - page 2

Good Morning Everyone - Just got home from 3-11pm and have to go in tomm. for 7-3 so I'll make this brief. What do you do with a nurse (a new grad) who on three different occasions at three... Read More

  1. by   Daytonite
    what i do with the people who use profanity is speak up immediately and very simply say, "you better not use that kind of language. if someone hears it and reports you, you'll get in trouble." then, the next time it happens, if there is a next time, it's "you better stop using the f-word, i'm not kidding". or how about just saying, "don't use that kind of language around me. i don't like it." if they persist, just walk away. eventually, they'll get the idea not to talk that way around you. tell the manager if you want and let her deal with it. this new grad is only going to "let loose on her colleagues", you, if you allow her to.

    also, saying that "it's hard to respect someone when their mouth is full of crap. it shows bad character and that she has a hard time controlling her emotions. she is a mother of two children! i find it hard to take her seriously. i don't know her well enough to suggest she clean up her act." is very judgmental and not very rational, in my opinion. i've had patients use profanity when telling me things and took what they said very seriously because that's the way they chose to express it. they use the profanity because it adds emphasis, defines their emotion about a subject and usually because it's their habit to use it. as long as it's not aimed as a personal attack at me, who cares? it's only a word. young people today use the f-word very freely. it's nothing but word play. people of all societies engage in this. don't misunderstand me, however, i don't think it's right or appropriate to be using it around other people without their permission as some people take great offense to it. that is when we need to speak up and let the person doing it know we would rather they not talk that way around us.
  2. by   meownsmile
    I totally understand Jess,, im not innocent in letting some fly now and then trying to keep it in private.
    Last edit by meownsmile on Dec 21, '05
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I like Miranda's advice. Pepper compliments wherever you can and make ANY criticism you do give very constructive and non-emotional. Seek not to treat her like a bad child, but an adult who may not realize how offensive her words are. We all have differing tolerance levels here; make yours clear to her.
  4. by   martymoose
    Anyone see the spongebob episode"sailer mouth" (aww, c'mon, I'm sure others watch it ) Those words are "sentence enhancers" you sprinkle a few here and there, and you got yourself a spicy sentence sandwich) .



    on a more serious note, I guess that nurse should be reminded of the customer service principle- you never know who might be listening- I have to edit myself- family members could be anywhere- who needs the complaints; we get enough complaints as it is-"my pillows not fluffy. this food tastes terrible, my nurse has a gutter mouth, etc
    Last edit by martymoose on Dec 21, '05
  5. by   ShawnetteRN05
    Quote from jrwest
    Anyone see the spongebob episode"sailer mouth" (aww, c'mon, I'm sure others watch it ) Those words are "sentence enhancers" you sprinkle a few here and there, and you got yourself a spicy sentence sandwich) .



    on a more serious note, I guess that nurse should be reminded of the customer service principle- you never know who might be listening- I have to edit myself- family members could be anywhere- who needs the complaints; we get enough complaints as it is-"my pillows not fluffy. this food tastes terrible, my nurse has a gutter mouth, etc
    yeah, I saw it LOL, but my excuse to watch it is a 8 year old brother! lol
  6. by   ShawnetteRN05
    The best approach would be to just tell her that it is inappropriate in this setting...
    But do keep in mind that she is a new grad (though it is not an excuse for foul language)and may be nervous and trying to adjust to a new setting. I can definately identify with her as a new nurse myself. Many have found it hard to adjust the the new settings and responsibilities that the role has to offer us.
    I would hope that you would approach her kindly and in a respectful manner, not like a naughty child; hopefully it will fix the language problem and help ease a new nurse into her new role!!
    Good Luck
    shawnette RN
  7. by   redshiloh
    Does she say "I'm Mary RN, your f******nurse for this shift. Now let's get our s*** together and get some d***** work done around this h***hole we call our f****** job.


    That really made my day... I got a mental picture of that one.
  8. by   Dalzac
    I,too, swear like a sailor. I do know that nurses that work in high stress areas like ICU and ER swear in nasty situations. But there are times when I never swear and that is with patients and my grandkids. and if you are in the habit of talking like that it is hard to restain yourself but I do. I know when it is apporpiate and not appropiate. If you don't like to hear it just tell her that it does offend you. And leave it like that but don't judge her for it you don't even know her. With our patients you don't judge them you just take care of them that is your job.
  9. by   Happy-ER-RN
    I also cuss like a sailor, I always have, and probably always will. I enjoy it, it makes me feel better. Those of you who don't should try it, really, next time you are angry just let out a few "f" bombs, laugh at yourself, then get over it.

    I never cuss in front of patients of course, but our nursing pods ARE sound proof and I let out a few profanities under my breath on a regular basis. I know when I need to be professional and I don't cuss around children or people who I know will be offended by it, but seriously they are just words!
  10. by   Super_RN
    Quote from Stitchie

    Does she say "I'm Mary RN, your f******nurse for this shift. Now let's get our s*** together and get some d***** work done around this h***hole we call our f****** job.:smiley_ab


    [/U]
    Oh crap! I just about spit my pop all over the computer screen! LOL!!!
  11. by   Super_RN
    I have a worse mouth than I care to have...However, not around my patients or at work. I blame it on beig raised by my dad, who was in the Marines and then drove truck for 15 years. Yes, it is my decision to speak those words. I'm working on it! With the exception of the other night when I was running my butt off at work (co-worker being...unmotivated) and my vent starting alarming. I peeked through the window and said "Oh s***, she extubated herself!" Whoops! Sometimes it happens, although I can honestly say I've heard doctors with much more foul mouths than about anyone else.
    Super
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Everyone has a slip-up . . . I guess I'm talking more about people who use profanity, especially the "F" word in every single sentence. As if they cannot intelligently express themselves without the crutch of profanity.

    I don't feel better when I let loose a cuss word . .. just ashamed of myself. Must be a product of my upbringing. If we said bad words, out came the Ivory soap.

    My Dad was a stereotypical 1950's dad, blue-collar union iron worker and former Navy. When he and my mom would fight, the profanity would fly. It scared me to death. Even hearing a man get angry and swear today makes me a bit sick to my stomach.

    Back to the subject - I still would not put up with working somewhere that profanity flies as the OP states.

    steph (resident old fogey)
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from super_rn
    I have a worse mouth than I care to have...However, not around my patients or at work. I blame it on beig raised by my dad, who was in the Marines and then drove truck for 15 years. Yes, it is my decision to speak those words. I'm working on it! With the exception of the other night when I was running my butt off at work (co-worker being...unmotivated) and my vent starting alarming. I peeked through the window and said "Oh s***, she extubated herself!" Whoops! Sometimes it happens, although I can honestly say I've heard doctors with much more foul mouths than about anyone else.
    Super
    I had to think for a minute about the docs I work with . . . . . I can only think of one who uses occasional profanity. They are all very professional at work.

    steph

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