Demoted from ICU to IMCU

  1. So I'm a new nurse working in a 14 bed icu. I just graduated in May and started working there in late July. It was going well with my first preceptor on day shift training then I was assigned a new preceptor on midnights which is my assigned shift. And from the beginning she had an attitude with me which I just ignored because almost everyone there is mad because they just started hiring new grads and there is alot of jealousy because most of them had to start in a step down unit or med surg area. Understandable to be jealous just sucks they're taking it out on me.
    So with my preceptor on midnights like I said she always had a terrible attitude or gave me a stupid look when I asked a question. I had a question about the IV medication that had a warning on the pump that said it should be in a glass bottle and it wasn't she just sighed loudly and snapped it's fine! And hit submit.
    I got over that and then later she snapped on me for following her after she said to follow her to get the aid she yelled I should actually be doing something instead of following her.
    So I went to do an assessment on a patient and she said she heard my preceptor and said my co-workers should be nice and that I should like where I worked.
    I almost lost it I wanted to cry so bad.
    So the next day I asked to meet with my manager to switch preceptors and she some how ended up turning it around to where I was too slow for critical care and talking me into going to IMCU which I knew would happen because they didn't want new grads in Icu and they're super short in Imcu they need to hire like 10 nurses over there so I seen it coming.
    People were making up lies like saying I don't help out and I'm like....i definitely help. This nurse asked for help putting in a rectal tube and I was the only one who would volunteer. I could definitely feel the nurses eat their young.
    I am just so bummed and disappointed. I feel like a failure. I don't even want to show my face. I'm going to be known as the girl who couldn't handle Icu.
    I understand not having new grads in Icu I just wish I would have started in Imcu instead of icu so I didn't get demoted. It also hurts that nurses would lie about me to try to get me out. I was nice to everyone, listened, helped when needed, and brought in treats...i just don't get it. I feel like such a loser. I feel like I shouldn't be a nurse....
    I also don't even think IMCU is for me....its not an area I ever thought to do nor have an interest in. But I love patients so I'll try...
    I just wanted to vent thanks for listening.
    Any advice is welcome
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  2. 52 Comments

  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    Being nice, listening, bringing in treats is nice, but unnecessary. There's no shame in not being successful in the ICU straight out of school -- most new grads are not there yet. I know I wasn't!...actually in hindsight I could have stood even more time on the floor than my 18 months.

    This is the reason many experienced ICU nurses think new grads should start on the floor first. It has nothing at all to do with jealousy.

    Take this opportunity, soak up all you can, become a proficient RN. You could very well be ready for the ICU then.
  4. by   not.done.yet
    I know it is hard when you started one place and were transferred to another, but moving from ICU to IMCU is NOT a demotion. Read that again. ICU nursing is not "above" IMCU nursing. They are two different specialties and the fact that you were moved means they see potential in you, otherwise you would have been outright let go. This forum is crawling with people who weren't given the chance you are being given.

    Is there a different pace in IMCU? Sure there is. Is it "easier" or "less important" than ICU? No. In fact, when an ICU nurse gets floated to the IMCU unit, the often have difficulty with the pace, the number of patients and the acuity they are required to deal with. Does that mean they are "less than" an IMCU nurse? Of course not. They are two different specialties, that is all.

    Nobody is going to know you as the person who flunked out of ICU. They are, however, going to be judging how open, friendly, trainable, cooperative and determined you are to make it work. Shake yourself off and square your shoulders. This is NOT a demotion. It is an opportunity to shine.
  5. by   jaderook01
    Quote from not.done.yet
    I know it is hard when you started one place and were transferred to another, but moving from ICU to IMCU is NOT a demotion. Read that again. ICU nursing is not "above" IMCU nursing. They are two different specialties and the fact that you were moved means they see potential in you, otherwise you would have been outright let go. This forum is crawling with people who weren't given the chance you are being given.

    Is there a different pace in IMCU? Sure there is. Is it "easier" or "less important" than ICU? No. In fact, when an ICU nurse gets floated to the IMCU unit, the often have difficulty with the pace, the number of patients and the acuity they are required to deal with. Does that mean they are "less than" an IMCU nurse? Of course not. They are two different specialties, that is all.

    Nobody is going to know you as the person who flunked out of ICU. They are, however, going to be judging how open, friendly, trainable, cooperative and determined you are to make it work. Shake yourself off and square your shoulders. This is NOT a demotion. It is an opportunity to shine.
    ^This x 100.
  6. by   cleback
    It wasn't a personal failure. They (preceptors, manager) were accustomed to training seasoned RNs instead of new grads and may not have known how to train you.

    Please don't attribute it to jealousy or say one area is "beneath" another. Just don't.
  7. by   RN in training
    Quote from cleback
    It wasn't a personal failure. They (preceptors, manager) were accustomed to training seasoned RNs instead of new grads and may not have known how to train you.

    Please don't attribute it to jealousy or say one area is "beneath" another. Just don't.
    This, x a million.
  8. by   caliotter3
    Approach your new assignment with a positive attitude and be thankful you still have a job.
  9. by   Jessy_RN
    How is this a demotion? You may not be ready to hit the floor running in the ICU and need to take it back a bit before going back. This is not a demotion, it's saving your butt. They could have easily just as you to resign or let you go by not passing you from orientation. After all, you are a new grad, right? Don't be too cocky. You're not better or worse for starting in the ICU and working your way back from step down.
  10. by   Penelope_Pitstop
    I agree, not a demotion at all. I did both MedSurg and ICU but, by choice, never did any stepdown or IMC type departments. I know I couldn't hack it.

    You actually have an opportunity for a fresh start here, which is rare in nursing. You never know, you may never want to go back to ICU!
  11. by   amoLucia
    Like everyone else has said, this is not a 'demotion'.

    You know, by considering the IMCU as a 'demotion', you are also considering the unit as less than the stellar, 'superior' ICU unit. And your new peers may feel your disdain and react to it. It's like you're also considering them as 'less than' nurses (as in 2nd string).

    You need to go in with a good, strong positive attitude. People will accept that from you.
  12. by   BSN16
    Quote from TiffanyB1313
    And from the beginning she had an attitude with me which I just ignored because almost everyone there is mad because they just started hiring new grads and there is alot of jealousy because most of them had to start in a step down unit or med surg area. Understandable to be jealous just sucks they're taking it out on me.e
    This probably isn't it. Nobody is jealous of you. A lot of concerns ICU staff have about hiring new grads is based around safety. I started in the ICU as a new grad myself and did well. However, sometimes when we hire multiple new grads all at one time, i am concerned about not having more experience on the floor especially after theyre done with orientation. It is not jealousy, and this is a poor mindset to have.
  13. by   BedsideNurse
    A couple of things...I agree with others that jealousy isn't an issue. Likely, the ICU staff isn't thrilled with having to train a new graduate nurse; it can be burdensome even if you are a really fast burner, and it can be a real safety and staffing issue if management starts hiring all sorts of inexperienced nurses into the unit. I know the last 3 ICU's I worked at would not hire new grads. Places that do generally have a really good new grad training program in place and/or really great preceptors that love teaching and are supported in doing that. Not too sure that's what you had going where you were.
    Anyhow, onto the demotion aspect. I know that no matter what anyone says here--for a while anyway--you are going to feel like it's a demotion, even though it's not. Not working out somewhere after you've put your best efforts in feels very hurtful and it sucks, and there is the looming feeling that the ICU "cloud" will follow you around to your new unit. Don't worry about the "cloud;" the few people that know you came from the unit aren't consumed by it. They'll just be glad to have the new staff on board, regardless of how you got there. As far as the personal disappointment goes, you are just going to have to grieve it for a little bit, think it over and come to terms with what happened, cry a river if you need to, but then push those self defeating thoughts out of your mind and be done with it. Don't be overly hard on yourself. Really! It sounds like the unit might of decided you weren't going to work out before you even started. Regardless, no one is born knowing this stuff and everyone started out at around the same place. You are actually ahead of the game a little. Being in ICU for a few months will give you a little head start when training on the step down. Also, step down is a challenging place to work but a great place to learn. Learn how to work on a busy step down and I think you can work just about anywhere.
    It's cliche but true: doors open and doors close for a reason. One way or another it will work out, and in a relatively short time from now you will look back and this whole upsetting ordeal won't mean a thing. It'll be a blip on the screen. Give it a little time and you & your skills and your confidence will grow and then you can figure out where to go from there.....I wouldn't have lasted 2 weeks in ICU right out of school, so I'm glad I didn't try, quite honestly. I needed to spend some time on various floors to get myself together. Other people head straight out of school into ICU and never look back. The deal is everyone and every unit is different. I've seen awesome, experienced nurses "not work out" in ICU, a number of times. Politics and generally stupid stuff and they were out. Sh*t happens and so you can be reassured that you certainly aren't the first person that has had to deal with such a situation, and you definitely will not the be the last. Let it go and just work to be as good as you can be where you are at. The rest will come. Best wishes!
  14. by   saskrn
    Jealousy is NOT an issue with the experienced ICU nurses.

    Instead of looking at this as a failure, appreciate the fact that your NM thought you were valuable enough to offer you another position.

    Years ago when I worked IMC, it was a very busy unit. In addition to stepdown patients, we often got critical patients because the ICU was too busy to take/keep them.

    There is a HUGE amount that you can learn working IMC. Jump at the chance!

    Good luck!

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