Jump to content

Wow, is it really a zoo out there?

Nurses   (2,396 Views 17 Comments)
by loving2 loving2 (New Member) New Member

loving2 has 8 years experience .

2,993 Visitors; 70 Posts

advertisement

I've been in public health for 10 years, and currently work as a school nurse (RN) for 5 years. I love it, but I need a change of pace and need to sharpen my clinical skills. I've never worked in a hospital. I've had 3 interviews. I've toured each of these hospitals and paid special attention to the climate on the floor. My last, most recent interview was horrible (as you may have gathered from another post). It has left a bad taste in my mouth and has me questioning my decision to work at ANY hospital. Period.

Is it a jungle out there? Lol Seriously. As I read through the posts on this board, I can't help but get nervous about working in a hospital. It seems there are unsafe nurse/pt ratios, nasty doctors, snooty overworked nurses, clinques, back-stabbers, harsh working conditions. Nurses are tired, worn-out, overworked, underappreciated, leg cramps, foot pain, back pain, mental pain, etc. Haha. I'm not trying to start a debate, I just want to know honestly what I can expect in a hospital enviornment. Am I in for a rude awakening? I am very adaptable, and personable. I feel that I fit in easily, but I don't like clinques. My plan is to work three 12s and I have a toddler and preschooler at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2,947 Visitors; 195 Posts

Depends on where you work. I work on a unit where I feel the nurse:patient ratio is safe, the nurses help each other and are supportive of each other in our work, there is usually a float nurse who is available to lend a hand if you get really behind, most of the doctors treat us well, and we do our own scheduling. It's generally a nice environment to be in.

Maybe my unit is in the minority, I don't know. Or maybe it's only the crappy ones that people come online to complain about, whereas people do not go to the effort of telling the world about the places that are more comfortable. Either way, there are hospital units that are not so high-strung.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,822 Visitors; 110 Posts

Either way, there are hospital units that are not so high-strung.

That is nice to hear, b/c I'm contemplating going back to school for my RN. Some of the posts on here make me want to stay at the job I already have! It is nice to hear some positives. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and works as a Emergency / Trauma Nurse.

4 Followers; 3 Articles; 146,017 Visitors; 20,896 Posts

I've been in public health for 10 years, and currently work as a school nurse (RN) for 5 years. I love it, but I need a change of pace and need to sharpen my clinical skills. I've never worked in a hospital. I've had 3 interviews. I've toured each of these hospitals and paid special attention to the climate on the floor. My last, most recent interview was horrible (as you may have gathered from another post). It has left a bad taste in my mouth and has me questioning my decision to work at ANY hospital. Period.

Is it a jungle out there? Lol Seriously. As I read through the posts on this board, I can't help but get nervous about working in a hospital. It seems there are unsafe nurse/pt ratios, nasty doctors, snooty overworked nurses, clinques, back-stabbers, harsh working conditions. Nurses are tired, worn-out, overworked, underappreciated, leg cramps, foot pain, back pain, mental pain, etc. Haha. I'm not trying to start a debate, I just want to know honestly what I can expect in a hospital enviornment. Am I in for a rude awakening? I am very adaptable, and personable. I feel that I fit in easily, but I don't like clinques. My plan is to work three 12s and I have a toddler and preschooler at home.

Yes......it is a jungle out here. Hospitals are making a very tough work enviroment right now bec ause of the insurances and new health care bill. They are not sure how it will impact their finances. Who do they pick on when tightening their belts? The largest expenditure that does not generate direct revenue...............NURSES. The pay (if you can find a job) is good but sometimes the extraneous bull---- is taxing. I have always loved bedside nursing..............it's the patients I love.............Good Luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RaziRN has 1 years experience and works as a Staff Nurse.

2,636 Visitors; 99 Posts

Welcome to the jungle, we've got fun and games.....

It is bad out here in hospital nursing, I have some excellent co-workers but my God, my job sucks. Maybe I'm just upset because the last five shifts I've worked have been horrendous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7,145 Visitors; 460 Posts

I have some excellent co-workers

...and that makes all the difference in making the intolerable tolerable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

General E. Speaking, RN works as a ICU nurse (finally).

4 Articles; 22,463 Visitors; 1,337 Posts

Who do they pick on when tightening their belts? The largest expenditure that does not generate direct revenue...............NURSES.

Yea, how wonderful is it to know our invaluable services and dedication are lumped in with the room charge? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ChristineN works as a RN.

28,281 Visitors; 3,464 Posts

I've had some great and some so-so hospital staff nurse jobs. The jobs that turned out the best were at teaching facilities which understood the importance of safe nurse-to-pt ratios.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10,614 Visitors; 400 Posts

is it a possibility that you can do prn a few days a month to sharpen your clinical skills? as difficult as it is in some areas of the country to find a nursing job, you may do better going prn somewhere. just my :twocents:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,000 Visitors; 16 Posts

if it's a zoo in the hospitals, then it's a jungle in the candidate pool. I graduated in may 2010 and still no job offers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cardiacmadeline has 6 years experience.

4,430 Visitors; 262 Posts

I think it depends on what hospital you work at. I feel very fortunate to work where I do. I like my coworkers, we have great teamwork on our floor. I feel for the most part that administration listens to what the nurses have to say and do their best to be accomodating. But of course, that isn't always the case. On my floor, our patient load is fair compared to other floors. I'm not saying it isn't too much sometimes, but compared to some other places, it is doable. Most of the doctors I work with are friendly, but there are always going to be the few that you hate to call.

I say go for it. Just remember, not a lot of people come on here to say how great their job is, they usually come here to vent. There are decent places out there to work. Hospital work is mentally and physically challenging, but I don't really see myself working anywhere else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mskate has 8 years experience.

5,905 Visitors; 280 Posts

It really will all depend on the unit/hospital/specialty you choose.

From my experiences, med/surg, tele and step down nurses seem to more run-ragged than other specialties. They have a larger patient load, with fewer monitoring equipment (so you have be much more on your assessment toes to anticipate problems), you have less control over visitation and most of your patients can talk, use the call light (a lot) and may try to climb out of bed, ambulate, etc... some nurses work best under these conditions. they like a very fast paced, multi-tasking type work environment.

Critical Care environments are highly stressful, but seem like the nurses are less worked to the bone - ratios are smaller, you have more monitoring equipment to be able to see problems coming before the patient starts to be symptomatic (hopefully), more control of visitation, the patients generally are not ambulatory, you are much closer to them physically so the call light can be cut down significantly... It does require a lot of training and a steep learning curve. Some nurses like the ability to really focus on 1 or 2 patients and focus on the minute details of each patient, other nurses do like the stress of codes and very critical patients.

Ultimately, it will always come down to - what patient population you work with the best, what types of stress you handle the best, and the nurses you work with. The better team work environment, the more flexible the manager - the better you will like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×