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Work as CNA with RN License? Is this allowed?

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by SwtPea2010 SwtPea2010 (New) New

Am I allowed to work as a hospital aid or cna if I already have an (CA) RN license? It is tough getting an interview for an RN job, so I am thinking applying to be a hospital aid? Or is this pointless because they will feel I will leave them in the long run once I get an RN job. What jobs are you working as right now, while you wait for employment??

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 6 years experience.

Your RN License encompasses the duties of the CNA and/or Aide. However, you'll also be held to the higher standard that comes with your license. The employer may not also want to take on any liability (real or imagined) for having an RN working in a CNA role, especially coupled with the idea that you might bounce off to an RN job with little or no notice.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

What jobs are you working as right now, while you wait for employment??
Rather than wait around for licensed nursing employment, I relocated out of California for my first nursing job.

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience.

Your RN License encompasses the duties of the CNA and/or Aide. However, you'll also be held to the higher standard that comes with your license. The employer may not also want to take on any liability (real or imagined) for having an RN working in a CNA role, especially coupled with the idea that you might bounce off to an RN job with little or no notice.

Exactly this. Few employers will take a risk of hiring an RN into a CNA role, knowing that said RN/CNA is searching for an RN position. It takes resources to train someone, and that's a liability to the department few managers are willing to risk.

You'll only have the scope (and pay) of a CNA while working in that capacity, but you'll be held to the standard of an RN.

There's a tech on my clinical floor doing this very thing. She's had her RN license since 2012,but has struggled to find placement as an RN, so she's been working as a tech. Fortunately, the hospital has decided to hire her as an RN starting in one month. In her case, I think working as a tech helped her to secure the RN position.

the employers only know what you tell them. background searches aren't like employer searches. I would apply for a tech job and get an rn job at another location. therefore in the future you can always come back to original location with experience

the employers only know what you tell them. background searches aren't like employer searches. I would apply for a tech job and get an rn job at another location. therefore in the future you can always come back to original location with experience

It is not necessarily true that "employers only know what you tell them." In many areas, healthcare (nursing, specifically) is a v. small "club" -- the movers and shakers tend to know each other and communicate. Most employment applications ask you to list all your education, licensure, and employment for the last X years -- if you omit any of that information in order to obscure your true level of education and licensure, and your employer later finds out, many (most?) employers consider sufficiently dishonest/fraudulent to be grounds for firing.

It is not necessarily true that "employers only know what you tell them." In many areas, healthcare (nursing, specifically) is a v. small "club" -- the movers and shakers tend to know each other and communicate. Most employment applications ask you to list all your education, licensure, and employment for the last X years -- if you omit any of that information in order to obscure your true level of education and licensure, and your employer later finds out, many (most?) employers consider sufficiently dishonest/fraudulent to be grounds for firing.

I never thought about that.

Can't work as an aide if you have your rn. You are not an aide anymore. At least you can't in Maine.

the employers only know what you tell them. background searches aren't like employer searches. I would apply for a tech job and get an rn job at another location. therefore in the future you can always come back to original location with experience

You really believe this?

Nursing is a fairly small world. It's easy to find a license someone would like to hide....and it doesn't take long to figure out someone is being shady, evasive on application/interview.

Your suggestions would go a long way to getting someone BANNED from employment in a hospital system.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Can't work as an aide if you have your rn. You are not an aide anymore. At least you can't in Maine.

Not that way in all other states. Not only that, but I know of APRNs who work as RNs on the floor.

Not that way in all other states. Not only that, but I know of APRNs who work as RNs on the floor.

Ok, but an APRN is still an RN. I think the point is that it's unlikely an RN will find work as a tech (and a facility will allow it).