Jump to content

Witchcraft resurgence

Nurses   (18,684 Views | 353 Replies)

2,128 Profile Views; 126 Posts

You are reading page 23 of Witchcraft resurgence. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

4 Followers; 29,019 Posts; 48,765 Profile Views

30 minutes ago, CharleeFoxtrot said:

Exactly. That is like standing in line at McDs and complaining you don't like the meal the person in front of you is ordering for themselves. 

What if you are a cardiology nurse and the patient comes in complaining of chest pain and has known disease and he's eating that Big Mac in the hospital or exam room?   I know noncompliance is another issue, but do we say nothing just because it doesn't harm us personally?

Edited by Tweety

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

126 Posts; 2,128 Profile Views

Nah you wouldn’t catch me in MCDs. Can that “food” even be considered food? Maybe if people didn’t put garbage like that into their bodies they wouldn’t need medical OR “holistic” care. But they drank a Diet Coke, so it’s fine. 
 

Don’t get me started on fast food. Along with smoking there should be a plan to work towards a complete ban. Bloomberg did a great job by limiting the soda sizes but we need more follow up. 

Edited by HelpfulNatureHopeful

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Followers; 4,695 Posts; 36,254 Profile Views

On 1/13/2020 at 9:41 AM, brownbook said:

WOW, where do you live? I was unable to get Tamiflu several months ago my doctor said my overall health was good and my symptoms were mild....AND there was a shortage of Tamiflu.  I'd love to know where I can go and have clerks hand out Tamiflu. 

The clerk who answered my call to make an appointment to see my Doc said they were supposed to not see pts who had the flu. 

I let her know that we didn't really know what I had, now did we, and told her how true diagnosing requires a culture.  I know she was just doing what she was told.  The more I think about it, though, it really was wrong to ASSume that everyone with a cough & fever had influenza - especially when it was a non-nurse answering the phone.  

She had a nurse call me back.  That person spoke to the doc, who ordered cough Rx, which was what I asked for, since I couldn't get an appointment.

They were essentially having operators diagnose over the phone.  And this was at a very large, well-known medical center.  I guess they were trying to accommodate everyone, at least to some degree.

I still think it was wrong to have a non-nurse, non-doc do it.

As for Tamiflu - it really doesn't help that much, IMO, and it comes with its own possible side effects.  Plus you have to start it very close to when you get sick, although I was told that this doctor will give it as long as 5 days after onset of symptoms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

14 Followers; 3,690 Posts; 38,263 Profile Views

On 1/26/2020 at 12:44 PM, popopopo said:

What's wrong with statins?

For starters, they don't prevent a first heart attack.  Studies have shown that when people with no cardiac history start on a statin, they will have heart attacks at the same rate as people who didn't start a statin.  Starting a statin after a heart attack has apparently been shown to prevent subsequent heart attacks.  (Don't ask me to cite the study; I read it a few years ago - maybe there's updated research now.)

It causes muscle damage.  Not just a little muscle pain cited in the patient information spiels.  A Swiss study using muscle biopsies showed varying degrees of muscle damage in people currently on statins and people previously on statins.  No muscle damage was found in people who had never taken statins.

I was on a statin for about 3 years before I noticed an increasing lack of stamina and worsening generalized muscle pain.  It was getting hard to get out of bed.  After I stopped the statin it took about a year before I finally regained my strength and stamina.  My partner, his father, and my mother were also all started on statins, with the same results.  Yes, 4 out of 4.  Fortunately, I recognized what was happening and got them all to stop, at which time they all got better.

Statins also increase the risk for dementia and they elevate blood sugar.  My partner's father experienced significant memory problems and my mother is diabetic.  So does it make sense to give them a drug that increases cardiovascular risk in order to prevent a cardiovascular event?

Just like Premarin, statins have become another rite of passage.  The whole racket needs to go the way of Premarin, IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hppygr8ful has 15 years experience and specializes in Psych, Addictions, Elder Care, L&D.

6 Followers; 3 Articles; 2,955 Posts; 33,489 Profile Views

1 hour ago, TriciaJ said:

Just like Premarin, statins have become another rite of passage.  The whole racket needs to go the way of Premarin, IMHO.

I remember when my mother's doctor put her on Premarin and she refused to take it because of a lifelong love of horses. She asked him it was true that the hormone came from pregnant horses. He patted her on the shoulder and said it's best not to think if such things. Premarin to my knowledge is still be prescribed in Canada and parts of the European Union and the abuse that the animals used to produce it continues...…...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hppygr8ful has 15 years experience and specializes in Psych, Addictions, Elder Care, L&D.

6 Followers; 3 Articles; 2,955 Posts; 33,489 Profile Views

I might add that when and if you go the nursing school you will have to take classes in culturally competent nursing!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WhaleTails has 1 years experience.

246 Posts; 1,759 Profile Views

13 hours ago, HelpfulNatureHopeful said:

Nah you wouldn’t catch me in MCDs. Can that “food” even be considered food? Maybe if people didn’t put garbage like that into their bodies they wouldn’t need medical OR “holistic” care. But they drank a Diet Coke, so it’s fine. 

Apparently metaphors are lost on you as well. Substitute McDonalds for salad or coffee or whatever.

I enjoy a particular brand of pen. I own a million of them and prefer to only buy this brand of pen. Who is anybody to tell me that the brand of pen I personally prefer sucks? I'm not making you use my pens. It's my pen for my own personal use. If you don't like my pens, don't use them.

My fiance likes hazelnut coffee. I think hazelnut coffee is gross. But it's not my coffee and I'm not the one drinking, so why should I tell him to stop buying hazelnut coffee? It makes him happy and doesn't affect me. He drinks his hazelnut and I drink my french vanilla and life goes on.

 

Edited by WhaleTails

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

14 Followers; 3,690 Posts; 38,263 Profile Views

20 hours ago, Tweety said:

What if you are a cardiology nurse and the patient comes in complaining of chest pain and has known disease and he's eating that Big Mac in the hospital or exam room?   I know noncompliance is another issue, but do we say nothing just because it doesn't harm us personally?

Well, what really can you say at that point, besides "I'm going to have you stop eating now in case the doctor wants to perform tests and procedures."  At some point he will get information and resources (probably not for the first time) about making the necessary diet and lifestyle changes.

Or you could say "Put down that Big Mac, you fool!  Look how fat you are!  And now you're having chest pain!  What do you think that's about?  Why do you want to stuff your face with crap and then come whining to us about chest pain?!" 

Of course we're all thinking that.  But we put on our sympathetic nurse face and do our jobs.  And try, if we can, to feel empathy for someone who can't seem to shift lifestyle gears because we all know how hard it is to change habits of a lifetime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

4 Followers; 29,019 Posts; 48,765 Profile Views

24 minutes ago, TriciaJ said:

Well, what really can you say at that point, besides "I'm going to have you stop eating now in case the doctor wants to perform tests and procedures."  At some point he will get information and resources (probably not for the first time) about making the necessary diet and lifestyle changes.

Or you could say "Put down that Big Mac, you fool!  Look how fat you are!  And now you're having chest pain!  What do you think that's about?  Why do you want to stuff your face with crap and then come whining to us about chest pain?!" 

Of course we're all thinking that.  But we put on our sympathetic nurse face and do our jobs.  And try, if we can, to feel empathy for someone who can't seem to shift lifestyle gears because we all know how hard it is to change habits of a lifetime.

Truth and I don't disagree, but I think the comparison of being in a McD's line and complaining about the meal of the person in front of you is a bit off in relation to the conversation in this thread.

But yes, you can lead a horse to water and if they don't want to drink I just say nothing.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

14 Followers; 3,690 Posts; 38,263 Profile Views

58 minutes ago, Tweety said:

Truth and I don't disagree, but I think the comparison of being in a McD's line and complaining about the meal of the person in front of you is a bit off in relation to the conversation in this thread.

But yes, you can lead a horse to water and if they don't want to drink I just say nothing.  

Maybe it wasn't the best analogy.  I think the point being made is that it is usually not one's place to disparage the beliefs of others, especially in healthcare.  Yes, there are exceptions; we all know examples of dangerous behaviour based on beliefs held by tiny minorities of people.

I think posters have been trying to impress upon the OP that holding oneself superior based on differences in beliefs is going to lead to a rude awakening down the road.  Most of us don't have the poker faces we aspire to and patients can pick up on judgemental attitudes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kakamegamama specializes in MCH,NICU,NNsy,Educ,Village Nursing.

1,030 Posts; 15,848 Profile Views

On 1/25/2020 at 11:01 PM, HelpfulNatureHopeful said:

Well if this therapy was that effective we definitely need to do some scientific research and start implementing it. 

No, I was just raised to believe in science. I was taught growing up that religion was for the clinically insane. My dad always said “if someone has to be threatened with hell to do the right thing, they are clearly a psychopath”
 

So do people that pray LITERALLY hear voices? Or do they “feel” something telling them to do the right thing? I mean I have that feeling but I thought that was a conscience? 
 

I just don’t understand. 

Yes, sometimes when people pray we hear a voice. It may be audible, as at times it has been for me, or, it may be a sense or knowledge in the depth of my soul that tells me I am to do something or am headed in the right direction or perhaps, the wrong direction. Because I am a Christ follower, my prayers and meditation on Scripture serve as a mode of communication as well. It sounds weird to some, and I get that. But I can assure you that I am not clinically insane. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

177 Posts; 4,217 Profile Views

On 1/12/2020 at 9:39 PM, juniper222 said:

In ancient times garlic was used to prevent infection. Garlic has antibacterial qualities as do other oils.  Granted its not as good as Ciprofloxacin or any other modern drug, it was not bad for the times.  Some of that ancient medicine is still used today, and if you know how to use it, it might save your life in a survival situation. 

Well, maybe for vampire attacks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.