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whats the main cause of stress that RN goes through at work?

Posted
yayita yayita (Member)

Personally I can hold down to stress at many jobs but I dont know if I can hold the stress working as a rn. I hear sooooo many negative experience about new nurse regretting going to school for nursing. After spending time, money, tears, stress, non sleep just to get that degree they finally find out is not what they want as soon they start working at the hospital. Im not saying that Im expecting not to go through those crazy stress if I become a nurse , but I want to know what is the *main* causes of stress at your work that makes you wanna quits. ? it the employee, doctors, patients, GOSSIPING, BULLYING, (speaking in general)

Edited by yayita

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

It's not bullying. And it's dependent on your job. For me, it's "am I going to find something today that warrants contacting DCF" and then, 2 days later, "is the family going to retaliate against me for reporting them for diluting their child's benzos?"

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

Bottom line for me:

Am I going to be able to responsibly care for my (too many) patients without neglecting anyone, missing any meds or giving any wrong meds due to stressful conditions, and then charting appropriately?

Can I accurately assess & stay on top of all my patients' conditions, orders, labs, procedures & protocols and charting same in a timely manner? All while dealing with ancillary services, phone calls & pages.

Doing all of the above while dealing appropriately with bad attitudes (patients, co-workers, management) & obnoxious family members?

Oh and did I mention charting?

Edited by roser13

dudette10, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Academics. Has 10 years experience.

It's being pulled in a million different directions at once, by everyone who feels that their need is more important than the next persons. This goes for administration, coworkers, doctors, and patients.

Pepper The Cat, BSN, RN

Specializes in Gerontology. Has 35 years experience.

Families.

Families with impossible expectations.

Families that won't accept that Mom will not be able to live alone again after her stroke, so different arrangements will need to be made.

Families that aren't happy no matter what you do. We had one family recently that no matter where their Mother was, they wan't her in the opposite place. Mom was up? Well - Mom needs her rest. She needs to go back to bed. Mom was in bed? Well, Mom needs to be out of bed you know. She won't get better if you leave her in bed.

Families that come on weekends and want to speak to the MRP NOW! What do you mean she isn't in this weekend? Why not?

Bottom line for me: Am I going to be able to responsibly care for my (too many) patients without neglecting anyone, missing any meds or giving any wrong meds due to stressful conditions, and then charting appropriately? Can I accurately assess & stay on top of all my patients' conditions, orders, labs, procedures & protocols and charting same in a timely manner? All while dealing with ancillary services, phone calls & pages.Doing all of the above while dealing appropriately with bad attitudes (patients, co-workers, management) & obnoxious family members? Oh and did I mention charting?
Perfect! I could not of said it better. It's not just one thing...it's the multitude of things (see above) that are all urgent and important that's stressful.

QuarterLife88, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Neuroscience. Has 8 years experience.

Where to begin...

1. ratios. On my floor it's 5:1, and IMO too high. A more reasonable load if you expect me to get everything done in a safe and timely manner would be 3:1 or 4:1 MAX. Also, add in short staffing because there is a budget to keep, to hell with the acuity. Then they want to blame the nurse when a patient falls. Well, DUH.

2. Demanding, rude, un-pleasable patients and their families.

3. Drug addicts/seekers

4. CIWA patients

5. The amount of charting is RIDICULOUS, and also takes away from the bedside. Half of the time all I can think about while with a patient is how I wish they would stop talking so I can get out of there because I have HOURS of charting to do and I do not want to stay late in this hell hole doing it.

6. Disrespectful coworkers who display jealously and back-stabbing. Also, lazy and rude techs who eye-roll and think their job starts and stops at vitals and blood sugars.

7. Rude doctors who treat you like an idiot when you call to clarify something. Err, sorry I'm not trying to harm my patient?

8. 12 hour shifts. But it's better than the alternative of working 5 days a week. I would never.

9. The ER. I don't know what is going on down there, but they are the bowels of the hospital and they get away with it.

That's just off the top of my head.

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

We carry a lot of responsibility. People see the tasks of nursing, but they don't see the decision-making made in ambiguity. We are not just doing tasks and following doctors orders. When things go wrong, the doctor isn't usually physically right there. The nurse pulls the patient through many a crisis.

Charting, as someone earlier mentioned is a huge part of our job, and it never seems to get easier.

There is just plain work overload. If 6 patients on complex med regimens are all supposed to get meds at 0900, you are almost guaranteed to have some late meds charted. Meds are scanned. Big brother is watching you. The manager can pull up a program on you and see a chart of what percent of meds were given late in the last month.

Nurses have little chance to say "not my job". Xray takes their pictures, PT gets them out of bed, they know the boundaries of their job. Nurses do not have well-defined boundaries and things fall to them.

We carry a lot of responsibility. People see the tasks of nursing, but they don't see the decision-making made in ambiguity. We are not just doing tasks and following doctors orders. When things go wrong, the doctor isn't usually physically right there. The nurse pulls the patient through many a crisis.

Charting, as someone earlier mentioned is a huge part of our job, and it never seems to get easier.

There is just plain work overload. If 6 patients on complex med regimens are all supposed to get meds at 0900, you are almost guaranteed to have some late meds charted. Meds are scanned. Big brother is watching you. The manager can pull up a program on you and see a chart of what percent of meds were given late in the last month.

Nurses have little chance to say "not my job". Xray takes their pictures, PT gets them out of bed, they know the boundaries of their job. Nurses do not have well-defined boundaries and things fall to them.

Any reggret of choosing the nursing field?

Being held to a high expectation and a low regard.

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

Any reggret of choosing the nursing field?

I regret that the stress of it cost me a good portion of my physical health, to say nothing of my sanity. I really needed to stay in nursing till age 66, but I only made it to 55 before my health issues forced me out.

That said, I'll never regret having been a nurse. I had a good career and did a lot of different things, and I learned a great deal of wisdom from patients, other nurses, doctors, even families. I also came away with a wealth of stories that I'll be telling for years to come. :)

Larry3373

Specializes in Critical Care; Recovery. Has 2 years experience.

Nursing is a well respected profession, but there are ever increasing demands on us as healthcare providers. One of the things not mentioned is balancing when to notify the physician or not. For example, it's 4:30 am and your patient has a critical WBC level of 25. Though it is critical, should you really wake the attending at 4:30 in the morning for a lab value consistent with previous values? Another example is patients that are intubated, sedated, and restrained. The intensivists' policy is to restrain all sedated/intubated patients, but he forgot to sign the restraint order for today and he has already left. Do you take the restraints off even though you know he will sign it tomorrow when he comes in? If you do and the patient extubates themselves this will cost you your job. However you may lose your license if you restrain someone without a current order. Nursing seems to be full of these types of legal (hence stressful) conundrums. I'm sure there are plenty of other examples, but you get the point right?

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

I don't regret choosing the nursing field. Since I only work part-time, I can handle the stress of the job better. I am not sure if I could do this full-time again. Nursing does have its rewards too. A lot depends on the demands of your particular job. There are a few plum nursing jobs out there that are great for long-term survival in nursing, but those jobs are few and are rarely hiring.

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience.

It all comes down to being understaffed.

There are days I regret going into nursing, such as my last shift where I got kicked so hard in the stomach I got the wind knocked out of me. That sucked. I work in a teaching hospital, so everyday I work I feel like I am in school, I learn a lot everyday and I am gaining experience. I just think of work as a battlefield and I am in the trenches with everyone else.... and I am going to do enough to where I feel I have a good amount of experience and then I am going back to school to get out of bedside nursing!

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 9 years experience.

I can deal with most things, but I get very stressed out when I feel like I have lost control of my time management. It snowballs SO fast.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 19 years experience.

The rare days that everything gets done are nice, the even rarer day when everything gets done and on time are amazing! Most days I am pulled in so many different directions I feel the job could be better performed by an octopus with really long arms. The vast majority of the stress is caused by knowing even on a good day I need to accomplish at least 10 hours of work in an 8 hour shift.

Karou

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 1 years experience.

Sometimes it's the demanding patients and family members. High acuity patients and understaffing, Most often it's just the stress of being pulled in too many directions at once. It's gotten better as my time management improves, but I still have days where I feel exhausted and overwhelmed, I think even experienced nurses do. There is also the emotional strain of trying to fix everyone and everything.