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What's the deal with black?

Posted

Specializes in med-surg, peds, ICU stepdown. Has 18 years experience.

I will be starting a new job next week and the RN's are required to wear black or white scrubs. What is the rationale behind black scrubs? Why in the world does management think it's suitable? It's just depressing & gloomy looking to me. At least you don't have to worry about seeing your undergarments :wink2:

truern

Specializes in Telemetry & Obs.

I have some black scrubs that are actually really attractive. And black is so slimming ;)

I admit black is an attractive color, but it sure picks up a lot of lint. All of the darker scrubs do. At the end of an shift, it looks like you are wearing speckled scrubs. (And really who has the time to use a lint roller every few minutes.)

The last hospital where I worked would not allow black scrubs for the same reason SCUnursie06 mentioned.... way too gloomy/depressing.

sweetsounds

Specializes in M/S,TELE,ORTHO,ER. Has 14 years experience.

That is one color I abhor. One of our docs wears them. Reminds my of the bad cowboy wearing the black hat thing. Previous post about lint is dead on.

Everything shows up on black. At the nursing home my residents would spit/throw food on me and when i transfered them I would get old people flakes all over me. After 16 hours everything was on them.

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

Everywhere I've worked, black and dark brown were not allowed because they were considered too depressing. If I had to choose between black and white scrubs, I'd rather wear black than white any day; fortunately, the LTC where I work is very liberal in its dress code and we can wear any color or pattern we choose. We don't even have to wear scrubs; sometimes I just wear a nice top with scrub pants (gotta have those pockets!) or jeans on Fridays and paydays. I bought so many outfits in my management days that I almost got rid of my scrubs; now I'm really glad I didn't!

dria

Specializes in home health, peds, case management. Has 10 years experience.

everywhere i've worked, black and dark brown were not allowed because they were considered too depressing. if i had to choose between black and white scrubs, i'd rather wear black than white any day; fortunately, the ltc where i work is very liberal in its dress code and we can wear any color or pattern we choose. we don't even have to wear scrubs; sometimes i just wear a nice top with scrub pants (gotta have those pockets!) or jeans on fridays and paydays. i bought so many outfits in my management days that i almost got rid of my scrubs; now i'm really glad i didn't!

good to hear that holding on to them pays off. i've moved my box o'scurbs three times now, that's how long it's been since i needed them!! i have rn friends with the same issue....you just never know...

I will be starting a new job next week and the RN's are required to wear black or white scrubs. What is the rationale behind black scrubs? Why in the world does management think it's suitable? It's just depressing & gloomy looking to me. At least you don't have to worry about seeing your undergarments :wink2:

:no: I could not wear black scrubs. I know this may sound vain (and I can't believe I'm taking this position) but, I have an olive complexion and a black uniform makes me appear ill and malnourished. So, I've worn white, pink and navy blue uniforms. I like the colors and I feel comfortable wearing those colors.

You don't "have" to wear the black scrubs do you? I mean, could you just wear white scrubs? At my job, I heard a rumour that they want us to wear one color.

i have some black scrubs that are actually really attractive. and black is so slimming ;)

that is what i was gonna say! :coollook:

at least black scrub pants!

steph

FireStarterRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in LTC, Med/Surg, Peds, ICU, Tele. Has 15 years experience.

Black can be very sharp looking on some people. Better than clowns and balloons, in my opinion.

Black can be very sharp looking on some people. Better than clowns and balloons, in my opinion.

Serious. I'd rather look clean and professional (if a little bit gloomy) than be walking around with some kind of cartoon print any day of the week. I always felt like those "fun" prints look really unprofessional....

statphleb SN

Has 20 years experience.

Nuns wear black--and honestly who doesn't trust a nun!?!

Sorry-just being silly!

I do agree with you for the most part--I think a nurse wearing all black would scare me alittle. Maybe just black pants with a different colored or print top wouldn't be too bad!!:D

Absolutely13

Has 2 years experience.

This has come up before and I still say too many nurses in black scrubs looks like a ninja convention. Just my :twocents:.

SweetRevelation

Has 10 years experience.

Where I work, there's supposed to be a 'dress code' also, meaning no drab colors or whatnot (brights make people cheery or something) but I've found that the dress code isn't enforced much at all. I've seen more nurses and nursing personnel wearing black than ever before and it works for them. I guess it's just a personal preference. Two of my fave scrub sets include one black pair of pants and one brown pair. I do brights, too... variety is the spice, so they say. :)

Indeed.

I only have Black, Dark Navy and Cranberry :D scrubs.

The black are by far my favorite. I don't know about hospitals but I am in LTC and no one seems to care.

This has come up before and I still say too many nurses in black scrubs looks like a ninja convention. Just my :twocents:.

True.....but deep down, who honestly doesn't want to be a ninja??

To the people who like and wear black, what do you do about the lint??

prmenrs, RN

Specializes in NICU, Infection Control. Has 42 years experience.

Clowns, balloons, and cartoons are VERY approriate in a pediatric setting.

I would not like to have to wear all black scrubs, altho I have some black pants. I tend to prefer pastel prints w/coordinating darker pants.

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