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What to do, what to do (a tad long)

Posted

Has 5 years experience.

I am a pre nursing student and I have some questions that you may be able to help me with.

First, I am a nurturing person. I want to use that gift to be the very best RN that I can be when I start my career. I love to help people, yes, even the ones that most people may feel don't deserve the time of day.

With that said, I am stuck in trying to decide my next step. I am finished with my pre reqs and am now waiting for my number to come up for the nursing program. Unfortunately, it wont be until next Sept. at the earliest and that is if I am lucky. But I want to do something NOW, something that will help me to help others when I do become RN.

My college offers two programs that I am interested in, however I cannot decide which one to take. One is for phlebotomy, that could be useful as nurses have to learn that anyways, and the other is a CNA course. I am aware what a job as a CNA entails, I think, and wonder if that would be my best bet as far as learning more to help in my future career. I don't care which makes the most money (between phlebotomist and CNA) what I care about is which will help me more in becoming the type of RN I want to be (not job wise, but personality wise). Any thoughts? I welcome ALL advice!

Thanks,

MissLo

Hellllllo Nurse, BSN, RN

Has 15 years experience.

I recommend taking the CNA course. I was a CNA, then LPN, and now RN.

As a CNA, you will work with nurses daily. The very first semester of a nursing program entails a lot of CNA type duties. If you are already a CNA, you will have an advantage.

I am a pre nursing student and I have some questions that you may be able to help me with.

First, I am a nurturing person. I want to use that gift to be the very best RN that I can be when I start my career. I love to help people, yes, even the ones that most people may feel don't deserve the time of day.

With that said, I am stuck in trying to decide my next step. I am finished with my pre reqs and am now waiting for my number to come up for the nursing program. Unfortunately, it wont be until next Sept. at the earliest and that is if I am lucky. But I want to do something NOW, something that will help me to help others when I do become RN.

My college offers two programs that I am interested in, however I cannot decide which one to take. One is for phlebotomy, that could be useful as nurses have to learn that anyways, and the other is a CNA course. I am aware what a job as a CNA entails, I think, and wonder if that would be my best bet as far as learning more to help in my future career. I don't care which makes the most money (between phlebotomist and CNA) what I care about is which will help me more in becoming the type of RN I want to be (not job wise, but personality wise). Any thoughts? I welcome ALL advice!

Thanks,

MissLo

If you decide to take the CNA route, here is a website that has videos lessons (free) for CNA students. These break down each course and section into easy to follow instructions. If you want to be well rounded, I think the CNA is the way to go. Phlebotomy as a career focuses on that one aspect of nursing. CNA will have you more one on one with the patients and their daily experience. GOOD LUCK with your decision.

misslo

Has 5 years experience.

Thanks for the advice! The website looks like it will be very helpful. Ya'll rock!

MissLo

lvnandmomx3

Specializes in Day program consultant DD/MR.

I 100% agree with the above poss.......

You will get alot more hands on with the cna. And you will be working with the pt.s longer with the cna. The plebotomy you will see them and they will be gone since it will only be a blood draw ( or do plebotomist do IV's?).

jlcole45

Specializes in ER, ICU, Education.

Missio -

Almost any hospital will train you off the street to do either job! (Especially if you tell them you are a pre nursing student)

You are wasting your money. So save it and go work at a hospital. This will accomplish a couple of things.

1. Give you some $$ - you'll need it once your back in school.

2. Many hospitals have tuition reimbursement programs which could be very helpful.

2. Provide you with hands of experience - this is the most important part. Many people are naturing, but not all can do nursing as a job.

If you have a choice go for the CNA because it is nursing.

Good luck

I recommend taking the CNA course. I was a CNA, then LPN, and now RN.

As a CNA, you will work with nurses daily. The very first semester of a nursing program entails a lot of CNA type duties. If you are already a CNA, you will have an advantage.

This is the major difference between the two choices. With CNA you will be working on a daily basis with patients AND the nurses. With a phlebotomist you won't have as much the opportunity to really see how the nurses work. You'll not really have the opportunity wor work with the nurses.

I 100% agree with the above poss.......

You will get alot more hands on with the cna. And you will be working with the pt.s longer with the cna. The plebotomy you will see them and they will be gone since it will only be a blood draw ( or do plebotomist do IV's?).

Phlebotomists do not do IVs. Depending on the hospital, it will either be the nurses themselves or an IV team.

Kris

locolorenzo22, BSN, RN

Specializes in Ortho, Neuro, Detox, Tele.

AND as a CNA, you'll always remember where you came from, when you become a nurse. The hardest thing to do is learn how to deal with patients and families. CNA jobs help you prepare for that, and you learn a lot of extra medical things that come into play while you passively listen to nurses. and many nurses often realize that once you're in NS, they'll go out of their way to let you watch procedures or learn about meds/labs/etc. at least if they're nice ;)

GrumpyRN63, ADN, RN

Specializes in Gyn Onc, OB, L&D, HH/Hospice/Palliative.

Go with the CNA, in our hospital the CNA"S are PCT's,( pt care techs) they do so much and the phlebotomy as well, goodluck!

nyapa, RN

Specializes in Jack of all trades, and still learning.

AND as a CNA, you'll always remember where you came from, when you become a nurse. The hardest thing to do is learn how to deal with patients and families. CNA jobs help you prepare for that, and you learn a lot of extra medical things that come into play while you passively listen to nurses. and many nurses often realize that once you're in NS, they'll go out of their way to let you watch procedures or learn about meds/labs/etc. at least if they're nice ;)

All of the above! Being a CNA (PCA here) is 'hard yakka', but then so is nursing.

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