Jump to content
MistyDawnRN06

MistyDawnRN06 BSN, RN

ICU
Member Member Nurse
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 157

    Content

  • 1

    Articles

  • 5,669

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

MistyDawnRN06 is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

MistyDawnRN06's Latest Activity

  1. MistyDawnRN06

    Is CRNA school as difficult as people said?

    CRNA school is physically, mentally, and emotionally exhausting. There will be days when you wonder why you did this to yourself. And then there will be days when you find it rewarding and remember why you're doing it :). I can only tell you about my personal experiences. In my program, we are not front-loaded, so we start clinicals semester one. Semester one, you carry 14 credit hours. That equals 7 graduate level classes. One of those classes is technically your clinicals one day a week. Semester two, you carry 14 credit hours. That again equals 7 graduate level classes, one of which is your clinicals two days a week. And class isn't just a few hours. This semester I'm in class from 7a-6p one day a week, Sim Lab 8hrs one day a week, and clinicals 24 hrs over two days. So, you're thinking that there are 3 free days a week - those days are devoted to reading and assimilating knowledge, writing care plans, memorizing, etc. For clinicals, I'm up at 4am and at the hospital by 5:15am. You will cover a ton of material each week. Your lectures are only a framework, and you are required to fill in the meat-and-potatoes around that framework. It will require a lot of self discipline and a lot of studying, concept understanding, and memorization. There are some things you need to be able to immediately answer from memory if you are woken from a sound sleep at 2am to provide anesthesia. This week's reading alone is 14 chapters in my various texts. These are not small chapters. You are responsible for all of the information in lecture and in reading for the exams. That can translate into 300-700 pages per week to read, assimilate, and be able to regurgitate both for exams and for oral boards in the clinical setting. You will be responsible for formulation of anesthesia care plans. Each night before my clinical days, I am expected to get the OR schedule, and read about each case that I will be providing anesthesia for. I have to prepare a care plan based on each surgery. Also, I have to be prepared to be "pimped" on information related to anesthesia, the surgical procedure, patient position, and patient co-morbidities (etc.). My program adds more clinical days per week each semester to a maximum of 5 clinical days per week with classes scheduled after your clinical day. By the end, you will do 50-60 hours a week in clinicals and then have classes on top of that. Some people find the material very difficult to understand, especially those without chemistry/physics/pharmacology backgrounds. So far, I haven't faced information that I find hard to understand, but I have been grossly overwhelmed by the volume of the information. Oh, and I forgot to mention that anything below a B is considered failing. You can't even make a B-. ** Having said all that, I've always found schooling pretty easy. I have a BS in Biology with a minor in Chemistry, then went to an ASN program, then did a BSN online. I rarely had to study for any of that stuff. CRNA school is a whole different ball game!! I have had to develop major study skills. I find I have very little down time. It is impossible to work. There are weeks when I only average 4 hours of sleep a night. Plus, you're broke and probably in more debt than you've ever been in in your entire life. There is also the inevitable drama with family &/or friends, and drama in the clinical setting to deal with. All-in-all, you get out of your education what you invest in it. If you work hard, you will become a well-rounded anesthetist. And P.S. If you're cocky, or a know-it-all, they will eat you alive.
  2. MistyDawnRN06

    CRNA question....

    P.S. Make sure you shadow some CRNAs! It would be good to get a letter of recommendation from one when it is time! Good luck! I got accepted :)
  3. MistyDawnRN06

    CRNA question....

    I can only speak for the CRNA programs in Florida. First, all CRNA programs require a bachelors degree either in nursing or in another science. I would suggest getting a BSN and working hard to improve your grades. Second, take some sciences and kick butt at them - ex. physical chemistry, organic chemistry, pathophysiology, pharmacology. You'll need at least a full year of ICU experience under your belt before your application will be considered for CRNA school. I would also suggest completing your CCRN certification after you've finished your first year in the ICU. As for the GRE, scores are good for 5 years and the minimum score most schools will accept is 1000 - (500 reading, 500 math). There are a wide variety of applicants for CRNA school that I've run in to. Some students have 4.0 GPAs, others have a 3.1 GPA. Most applicants have their CCRN. GRE scores range from 1000 to 1200. Experience levels range from 1.5 years to 16 years in an ICU. Your interview for a CRNA program counts for a lot. But be prepared to explain why you made the grades you made. Some programs understand "immaturity" or life happening or whatever so long as you show a definite improvement once you started planning to go to CRNA school. So, study hard, show the admissions committee that this is what you want, and speak from the heart in an interview and you may secure yourself a spot! Look around these boards, several people have posted their stats.
  4. MistyDawnRN06

    Disappointed with AACN's NTI 2010 Washington, DC

    I too was disappointed with NTI 2010 in DC. It was my first NTI and I've been an ICU nurse for 4.5 years. While it was fun and empowering to see so many nurses that share my profession, I didn't glean much from the classes. I am a self-driven studier, so I was hoping to learn more than I've already taught myself and what I've learned working in an aggressive, high acuity level one trauma teaching facility ICU. I was disappointed with the classes overall. The general assemblies were good, I enjoyed the speakers and the motivators. I'm not entirely sure I'll go again based on the expense involved. If I do, I think I'll focus more on the advance pratitioner classes hoping to learn something more. The best class I attended was actually the last class on the last day taught by a CRNA. It was awesome! I did really love the fact that the AACN was able to get the Smithsonian museums to open up for the nurses after hours. That was truly amazing!
  5. Depends completely upon the program you are applying to. Most recommend having science courses in the last 5 years, but not all require it. Some require an assessment or physiology course within the last 5 years. One school here in Florida requires a chemistry course within the last 5 years. You may need to re-take a course or two depending on which program you apply to. Most programs have a website that spell out the requirements. Good luck!
  6. MistyDawnRN06

    when to start applying

    Each school has a different application deadline. Start exploring the programs of the schools that you are interested in. They will tell you when to submit by. They all have different submission dates, so watch the calendar. You can get your GRE out of the way - scores are good for 5 years. Applications are extensive, expensive, and time consuming, so I suggest starting early. Keep copies of everything. More than likely something will get lost and you will have to resubmit.
  7. MistyDawnRN06

    CRNA programs that accept minimal ICU experience

    At least in Florida they all require a minimum of 1 year of experience. Also, I would recommend completing your CCRN which will also require about one year of bedside experience. Good luck!
  8. MistyDawnRN06

    University of North Florida

    I'll be interviewing with UNF CRNA program in January as well. I haven't heard anything about the interview process though. Any insights would be great!
  9. MistyDawnRN06

    Barry Interview help

    I interviewed December 2nd for January 2012 entry as well! I'm still waiting to hear....
  10. MistyDawnRN06

    What specialties lead into CRNA school?

    Generally speaking, one year of ICU experience is required to be considered for CRNA school. ICU can be neonate, pediatric, or adult. CRNA programs will not accept PACU/Recovery, OR, med-surg, telemetry or IMC/step-down. You need to have intimate experience with ventilators, vasoactive agents, inotropic agents, sedative agents, procedures, etc. which only the ICU setting can provide consistently. The higher acuity the ICU the better.
  11. MistyDawnRN06

    Burnout

    I hope the responses keep coming. Thank you all so much! Nurseforlife, I absolutely love your quote. That pretty much sums up nursing . . .
  12. MistyDawnRN06

    Summing up nursing

    Nursing is occasionally comparable to the art of juggling piranhas while handcuffed, blindfolded, and riding a unicycle....on a high wire with no net. (author unknown) ** This was sent to me by my mom, who is a nurse of 30 years.
  13. MistyDawnRN06

    Burnout

    Someone told me that burnout occurs usually within about 5 years of becoming a nurse. That's not a very long lifespan . . . My mom is a nurse of 30 years. She sent me this: Nursing is occasionally comparable to the art of juggling piranhas while handcuffed, blindfolded, and riding a unicycle....on a high wire with no net. (author unknown) That about sums it up!
  14. MistyDawnRN06

    Burnout

    Thanks all! I had a particularly bad week and writing is my outlet. Sometimes that writing needs an outlet other than my computer, so I offer it up to others. Writing helps me re-charge and let go and put things in perspective. Once I've let it go, I find the strength to do the internal re-phrase of the situation that I need. I went through an emotional intelligence series at work and while it was helpful, it also brings up more of the work that I have to do internally to achieve longevity in this field. Sometimes I catch a lot of flack when I try to fight the good fight at work. I'm still a relatively young nurse and am still learning my way through the bureaucratic and political mine fields that are hospitals. It's not always easy. Anyway, thank you all for the kindness and the reassurances. If I was able to move some of you, I am grateful. Thank you for listening, and thank you for caring. We all need a boost at times . . .
  15. MistyDawnRN06

    burnout

    As suggested, this post has been submitted for the article writing contest. Thanks to all!
  16. MistyDawnRN06

    burnout

    Thanks all! I had a particularly bad week and writing is my outlet. Sometimes that writing needs an outlet other than my computer, so I offer it up to others. Writing helps me re-charge and let go and put things in perspective. Once I've let it go, I find the strength to do the internal re-phrase of the situation that I need. I went through an emotional intelligence series at work and while it was helpful, it also brings up more of the work that I have to do internally to achieve longevity in this field. Sometimes I catch a lot of flack when I try to fight the good fight at work. I'm still a relatively young nurse and am still learning my way through the bureaucratic and political mine fields that are hospitals. It's not always easy. Anyway, thank you all for the kindness and the reassurances. If I was able to move some of you, I am grateful. Thank you for listening, and thank you for caring. We all need a boost at times . . .