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NutmeggeRN NutmeggeRN (Member)

Therapy dogs and Allergies

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You are reading page 4 of Therapy dogs and Allergies. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

The way I see it is at some point my child has to know how to manage his allergies and asthma on his own. Realistically, I can't be with him all of the time. He's 9 and is very aware of what he needs to look out for and when he needs to alert an adult when he is in trouble. We are very blessed to have an amazing elementary school that works with him, myself, and his doctors. As a team we are able to keep things under control but ultimately none of that will work unless my son is educated on his asthma and allergies. He also realizes that he can't do everything else his peers do and that's okay bc needs come before wants and it's up to him to make sure he knows his boundaries. He also knows he isn't a special snowflake and the world can't always accommodate him. That's why educating him has been so important.

Awesome parent!

I must say, this is the attitude I encounter most often from parents of kids with true life-threatening allergies. It's the parents who jump on the latest Dr. Oz/Oprah/Food Babe-backed fad who want everyone to accommodate them.

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I think the issue here is that Therapy dogs are not a part of any individual care plan and don't fall into ADA requirements...like service dogs. The comparison will rile some but therapy dogs are like "calming rooms" or coloring books to be used on an as needed basis without any type of medical guidance or instruction. As the positive affects continue to manifest from Therapy dogs they will continue to become more and more popular; hence my initial statement...therapy dogs, nowadays, will trump allergies - a circle back to providing for "the greater good" and the individual with dog allergies will just have to avoid the allergen...putting it harshly, "you can't come in here because you're allergic to the dog."

Again, I'm not anti-therapy dog...I'm just stepping back and looking at the broader complexion.

I think it would be a big paperwork hooplah to get said therapy dog approved under the 504, but if you have a child with anxiety and their therapy dog is their means of getting to school and having academic success then they can make a pretty compelling case to a board for a reason for having it. I'm not sure that a doctor would be quick to write for it, but then again, the accomodations i've seen parents capable of getting over the years have been some doozies. Some of them will just doctor shop until they find someone who will give in.

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So having had a conversation with the student who wants this, it will be in presumably the guidance area for kids or staff who want to chillax. Just a chill ou,t pet the doggie kind of experience. My adm tends to be a bit phobic about such stuff, so we shall see....

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So having had a conversation with the student who wants this, it will be in presumably the guidance area for kids or staff who want to chillax. Just a chill ou,t pet the doggie kind of experience. My adm tends to be a bit phobic about such stuff, so we shall see....

I will advise them to do the research...Certified Therapy Dogs come at a great financial and training investment and have assigned handlers who are in their attendance at all times.

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I think that the therapy dog would trump the allergies. In most cases, allergies can be controlled via OTC meds

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I think that the therapy dog would trump the allergies. In most cases, allergies can be controlled via OTC meds

And anxiety can be controlled by meds too so who gets to go med-free?

I see what you're saying, but I wouldn't want my kid to have to take a bunch of allergy pills (which do have side effects) just to go to school. If it was only one day a week, I'd be okay w/it, but more than that and I think I'd be concerned. Of course, that kind of negates what I said earlier about every family handling their own problems. So is anxiety worse than allergies? I've had a lot of anxiety, never allergies so I can't answer w/o bias.

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Who gets to clean up any dog potty accidents???? I see this automatically falling to the school nurse??

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Who gets to clean up any dog potty accidents???? I see this automatically falling to the school nurse??

Pet therapy dogs are required to have their handlers with them while providing therapy.

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I agree with you OldDude. I also think that the type of therapy dog would also have to be considered.

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I'm a volunteer service dog trainer for a national organization. Please check your state laws, as they vary. If the dog is an actual service dog (extensive training), it IS an extension of the person with a disability. If the child has the dog for autism or an emotional issue, that is generally considered a "skilled companion" and not a SERVICE dog.

There is NO insurance that is mandated for service dogs and no registry of any sort. If another person has an allergy, the facility/school has to have a policy to deal with it.

There should be NO POTTY ACCIDENTS with a trained service dog. If there are, this is not a properly trained service dog.

Edited by Carrie_RN
added a sentence

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I'm a volunteer service dog trainer for a national organization. Please check your state laws, as they vary. If the dog is an actual service dog (extensive training), it IS an extension of the person with a disability. If the child has the dog for autism or an emotional issue, that is generally considered a "skilled companion" and not a SERVICE dog.

There is NO insurance that is mandated for service dogs and no registry of any sort. If another person has an allergy, the facility/school has to have a policy to deal with it.

There should be NO POTTY ACCIDENTS with a trained service dog. If there are, this is not a properly trained service dog.

Thank you for the information, but we're talking about a Therapy dog. Not a companion or service dog intended for one person's needs, but a dog for an entire school or school district to utilize.

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