Jump to content

Stock Epinephrine

We are in the process of setting up our stock epi policy. Our state law says that a lay person can administer epi to student/staff/visitor with signs of anaphylaxis if they voluntarily become trained in signs/symptoms and demonstrate knowledge of how to use the epipen. I am not sure I like the idea of delegating responsibility for "diagnosing" probable anaphylaxis in someone who has not been diagnosed by a doctor. I'm fine with them recognizing symptoms in someone who has been previously diagnosed ie they have an epipen but not with them. Your thoughts?

SassyTachyRN

Has 4 years experience. Specializes in Peds, Oncology.

I have multiple schools. This task is delegated to my secretaries when I'm not in the building. They have access to me via the phone all the time and I trust that they would call before they injected someone with epinephrine. I can't be in multiple places at once, and I have trained them so I trust they could make a good judgement call with my direction and/or the direction of 911.

Are you by chance in NC where the new epipen law went into effect 11/1???

Our school district decided only those that are CPR certified can administer the med.

I am not sure I like the idea of delegating responsibility for "diagnosing" probable anaphylaxis in someone who has not been diagnosed by a doctor. I'm fine with them recognizing symptoms in someone who has been previously diagnosed ie they have an epipen but not with them. Your thoughts?

Between 20-25% of Epi used in schools is for a previously undiagnosed allergy, and school age kids and teens are at the highest risk of fatality in anaphylaxis.. The reality is, we HAVE to start training non-medical people to recognize the symptoms and act quickly. As long as you include "have one person call 911 while another stays with the student and administers the Epi," I don't see why you would hesitate to train more people. (Source)

Think of it this way: what's the worst that will happen if someone gets Epi and doesn't actually need it? And what's the worst that will happen if someone truly does need it, but doesn't get it?

JenTheSchoolRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in School nursing.

Between 20-25% of Epi used in schools is for a previously undiagnosed allergy, and school age kids and teens are at the highest risk of fatality in anaphylaxis.. The reality is, we HAVE to start training non-medical people to recognize the symptoms and act quickly. As long as you include "have one person call 911 while another stays with the student and administers the Epi," I don't see why you would hesitate to train more people. (Source)

Think of it this way: what's the worst that will happen if someone gets Epi and doesn't actually need it? And what's the worst that will happen if someone truly does need it, but doesn't get it?

THIS. I would rather have something give Epi when in doubt. If they do and the kid doesn't need it, really not much is going to happen. If they do need it and they don't get it, the repercussions can be deadly. Give Epi, have someone else call 911.

I mention this every time I train staff; I don't currently have stock Epi-pens - wish I did and am hopeful I can have them soon!

This same kind of law passed in CA and will take effect in Jan 2015. We are scrambling . . . . no doc wants to write the Rx for us. They didn't consider that when they wrote the law although other states did.

NutmeggeRN, BSN

Has 25 years experience. Specializes in kids.

THIS. I would rather have something give Epi when in doubt. If they do and the kid doesn't need it, really not much is going to happen. If they do need it and they don't get it, the repercussions can be deadly. Give Epi, have someone else call 911.

I mention this every time I train staff; I don't currently have stock Epi-pens - wish I did and am hopeful I can have them soon!

Have you looked into the Epipens for Schools program? We have got them the past three years, free!

JenTheSchoolRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in School nursing.

Have you looked into the Epipens for Schools program? We have got them the past three years, free!

I have, it has just been a trial getting the new orders signed by those that need to...long story. But working on it :yes:

NutmeggeRN, BSN

Has 25 years experience. Specializes in kids.

Good luck!

T-Bird78

Has 6 years experience.

Um, pts with food allergies (and their parents) are lay people who aren't trained to know what anaphylaxis is but use EpiPens when needed. I'd rather have a lay person administer an epipen than a stock bottle that had to be drawn up and injected. Most states are a right to carry state.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

I'm thinking New Jersey is looking into the epi pens also. I read it somewhere?

Um, pts with food allergies (and their parents) are lay people who aren't trained to know what anaphylaxis is but use EpiPens when needed. I'd rather have a lay person administer an epipen than a stock bottle that had to be drawn up and injected. Most states are a right to carry state.

"Stock epinephrine" in this case should be referring to EpiPens. As far as I know, there are ZERO states that have stock bottles. But most are moving toward having stock epinephrine in the form of two to four EpiPens (and/or EpiPen JRs) in the school.

coughdrop.2.go, BSN, RN

Has 3 years experience. Specializes in School Nursing, Public Health Nurse.

This same kind of law passed in CA and will take effect in Jan 2015. We are scrambling . . . . no doc wants to write the Rx for us. They didn't consider that when they wrote the law although other states did.

Ugh yes that law...I understand what California was thinking, but no one was thinking! No law there has to be School Nurses (or rations), but lets have ALL schools have Epi-pens. Let them find their own physicians and lets figure out the training on their own. Sheesh.

OP: The NASN has great resources for training School Staff and like others said, as long as you have given appropriate training and check the Staff off, they are responsible. Also, what State are you in? In my State, CA, "volunteers" are found by sending an email to all Staff in the school and volunteers can come forward. Admin cannot make unlicensed Staff volunteer. If no one takes the bait then the Principals and Vice Principals must be the ones to do the training.

NASN | Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis

×

By using the site you agree to our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies.

OK