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Staff Nurses Who Refuse To Precept Or Teach?

Nurses   (13,244 Views 82 Comments)
by All4NursingRN All4NursingRN (Member) Member

13,394 Profile Views; 373 Posts

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maxthecat has 27 years experience.

243 Posts; 7,164 Profile Views

Personally I wouldn't want to be precepted by someone who didn't want to teach. I don't think it is every nurses's responsibility to precept either. To give help to a new nurse, yes--to formally precept, no.

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

4 Followers; 4 Articles; 8,881 Posts; 104,355 Profile Views

My facility requires those who want to precept to apply for such a position and take a course in how to be a preceptor. It comes with $1/hour extra when working with an orientee. As an educator, I have actually refused to sign off on a preceptor application from someone well known to have a poor attitude and become verbally aggressive (the nurse manager also did not want to sign off on the application). It's a way to reward those willing to precept while ensuring that those who are orienting are paired with someone who knows how to be a preceptor, wants to be a preceptor, and has been approved to be a preceptor.

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winniewoman9060 has 30+ years experience and specializes in icu,prime care,mri,ct, cardiology, pacu,.

73 Posts; 1,852 Profile Views

I liked to precept new nurses. I learn right along with them. I have lots of experience as a nurse, and like the relationship that develops between the preceptor and preceptee.

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KeepinitrealCCRN has 5 years experience and specializes in SICU,CTICU.

112 Posts; 2,723 Profile Views

i don't like when managers/institutions force senior nurses to precept or do things they don't want to/are not good at. why would anyone want to do something they aren't good at or don't like, they will be poor preceptors no matter how much experience they have. personality and the desire to teach make the best preceptors. also, just because you have a lot of experience doesn't make you a good nurse.

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Racer15 has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ED.

707 Posts; 9,723 Profile Views

I don't like precepting and I'm not good at it. I'm impatient and I don't wait around for my preceptee when things need to be done so that they can have a "teaching moment." In the ED, I am about the opposite of what a new hire needs. I don't mind being a resource, but it's stupid to force nurses to precept when they know it's not for them. You're only hurting the new hire. Step on down from those high horses, good lord.

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Crush has 13 years experience and specializes in Case manager, float pool, and more.

462 Posts; 3,989 Profile Views

My facility requires those who want to precept to apply for such a position and take a course in how to be a preceptor. It comes with $1/hour extra when working with an orientee. As an educator, I have actually refused to sign off on a preceptor application from someone well known to have a poor attitude and become verbally aggressive (the nurse manager also did not want to sign off on the application). It's a way to reward those willing to precept while ensuring that those who are orienting are paired with someone who knows how to be a preceptor, wants to be a preceptor, and has been approved to be a preceptor.

My facility does the same thing. Although I wish it was $1 more an hour. We don't get pain more money but we do have those who sign up for it and take a course as well. Personally I like teaching/precepting but I think it is a disservice to the new hire/ new nurse to be paired with someone who hates it, has a bad attitude about it, etc.

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3ringnursing has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in ICU; Telephone Triage Nurse.

1 Article; 543 Posts; 8,772 Profile Views

Every one of us were precepted, without exception. We all had to learn from someone else first. I always felt it was my JOB to precept when called upon to do so. I never minded because I never forgot that feeling of being new and knowing squat. Or at times being unwanted, feeling like a millstone around another nurse's neck. I'd rather they be with me than someone who would be hostile. Being new is scary.

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MA Nurse specializes in NICU, Telephone Triage.

676 Posts; 9,890 Profile Views

As a nurse, after so many years of being a nurse (27 1/2) I really don't want to have the added stress of helping a new nurse. I've done it enough over the years and it's not required, so nurses who want to do it should, those of us who don't, shouldn't. It will also be better for the new nurse not to be trained by a nurse who doesn't want to train!

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373 Posts; 13,394 Profile Views

Oh my what a Pandora's box I have opened.

Then I wonder what if no one on a unit wants to precept and this I ask speaking from experience.

Two years ago every nurse the manager approached refused to precept so she had to mandate someone... oh boy what do you think of that then?

Well I'm thankful for those who precepted me way back when, whether they felt like it or not at least they were professional enough not to let it show and exercise patience and I'm sure with me under their wing it wasn't that bad at all (as that I was released from orientation early as a new grad working trauma, yes I am bragging)

It's just precepting it isn't the end of your nursing career, I'm sure most of you aren't approached to precept a new nurse every 6 weeks like my current job (our turnover is horrendous) and goodness $1/hr extra for precepting, what a joke!

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics.

2,968 Posts; 29,139 Profile Views

I just wish our current staffing would allow for an actual preceptor. We have been pairing a new orientee with a nurse that has been employed for less than 3 months because she was the only nurse scheduled that day that regularly works the shift. She's good, but she's new herself. We have a few experienced nurses that have a less than positive attitude, the only thing a new orientee gets from them is a bunch of complaining while the orientee does all the work. Now I'm all for hands on learning, but that shouldn't mean the orientee works while the training nurse watches, complains about work and gossips about other staff.

Sigh, now I'm off to work myself so everybody have a great day!

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927 Posts; 9,344 Profile Views

You're entitled to your opinion and I'm entitled to think you're wrong

Feel free to do so, but based on the comments responding to your posts, it would seem you're in the minority.

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smartassmommy has 1 years experience.

324 Posts; 8,775 Profile Views

Is it wrong to pray that whoever gets stuck with me when I start my first new grad job in a couple of weeks likes having the newbie underfoot?

How can I be a good orientee? I want to get off to a good start learning how to be a nurse.

Edited by smartassmommy
Wasn't finished

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