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So why even bother with getting an RN?

Posted

[h=2]Saw an ad for urgent care wanting to hire MAs. They want you to be able to provide compassionate nursing care, assessing patients & taking effective action. They also want you to be able to triage critically ill patients and prioritize patient care appropriately as well as have skills in assessing, prioritizing many requests by patients, families, physicians, staff. You have to have skill in their EMR & infection control. You gotta coordinate care between clinic and other facilities such as hospitals or physician offices & do telephone triage and call backs ...among many & assorted other requirements.[/h]

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

Sounds illegal to me.

Tait, MSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Cardiac, Education, Prof Practice. Has 14 years experience.

Yeah something about that doesn't sound kosher with me either.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

In answer to the question posed in the title: because (legalities aside), an RN doing the same job is going to be paid 2-3x more.

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

The MA will be inexpensive until the lawsuit from a poor "assessment" misses something major.

MA's are not regulated and as such it is ok for them to do all the above. It means nurses are not even welcome in urgent care. I have one by my house and they have an opening but not for a RN or BSN it is for a MA to do all the RN jobs. The only RN they have is a NP who is the doctor on call. The MA that works there told me they laugh at RN's who spend so much time and money going to school and they can not find work when the MA has no debt and lots of work. I am about to graduate as a BSN and found a job online today that payed 12.00 / hour the MA is starting at 16 / hour. So we as nurses need to work on States regulating MA's.

I would be interested to see their actual job description...and then run it past the Board of Registration in Nursing. It may be that they are acting as delegates to the NP, like LPNs/CNAs, in which case it's her butt if they screw up.

MA's are not regulated and as such it is ok for them to do all the above.

Not true. While they aren't regulated, that doesn't mean that they're just able to do anything and everything.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

I would be interested to see their actual job description...and then run it past the Board of Registration in Nursing. It may be that they are acting as delegates to the NP, like LPNs/CNAs, in which case it's her butt if they screw up.

I think MAs can only act as delegates to physicians, not APRNs.

LTCNS, LPN

Specializes in Clinical Documentation Specialist, LTC.

The wound clinic I just left only hires RNs and LPNs. They will not hire MAs. On the other hand, most urgent care clinics in my area only hire LPNs and MAs, with RNs acting as managers and triage nurses.

CapeCodMermaid, RN

Specializes in Gerontology, Med surg, Home Health. Has 30 years experience.

$12/hour for an RN? My CNAs make more than that.

ChristineN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatric/Adolescent, Med-Surg.

It doesn't sound right to me either. One thing I noticed when I did peds is a lot of peds clinics will have RN's on staff, perhaps because of the liability involved with kids

BlueDevil,DNP, DNP, RN

Specializes in FNP, ONP. Has 25 years experience.

I think MAs can only act as delegates to physicians, not APRNs.

This depends on the state. It is not the case here. I can delegate anything to my MA for which I am willing to assume liability.

samadams8

Specializes in Peds and Adult Critical Care. Has 20+ years experience.

In answer to the question posed in the title: because (legalities aside), an RN doing the same job is going to be paid 2-3x more.

Exactly

samadams8

Specializes in Peds and Adult Critical Care. Has 20+ years experience.

This depends on the state. It is not the case here. I can delegate anything to my MA for which I am willing to assume liability.

What state are you working in? No license for te MA to lose...no independent sop. And just b/c you can, it doesn't mean you should...right? Me, I'd set strict limits...base vs, wt, very basic. If you need more, you should have an experienced licensed nurse. Least that's how I'd go...everyone will do whatever I supposed.

In some states, and looks like California may not be one of them, a MA in a clinic/MD office works under the direction of the MD. So they can ask an MA to do whatever it is they would like to in those forums. They assist the doctor, "speak" for him if you will. (as the pp best said it, act as a delegate). Which sounds extremely dangerous. ESPECIALLY with telephone triage and assessing. MA's are trained to take vitals, some do blood draws,I am not sure how much assessing that they would do-- and to run the back and front offices. They certainly are not learned in making a judgement about what their "head to toe" could mean--cause then they would have gone to nursing school.

If they are in fact just information collectors and run everything by the MD for further instructions, a huge time waster. "Mr so and so has chest pain. He took nitro. What now?" That is dangerous, in my opinion.

duskyjewel

Specializes in hospice.

So we as nurses need to work on States regulating MA's.

You know, it's really no wonder this country is going to hell in a handbasket, with thinking like this. The solution to your problem is to sic the government on someone else, to take away their job by regulating it out of existence? Who else's job would you like to use the power of overbearing government to destroy?