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Should I stay or go? 1st Year RN wanting to quit without another job in place.

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pthelper777 has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ED/Trauma/Field Case Manager.

2,519 Profile Views; 55 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Should I stay or go? 1st Year RN wanting to quit without another job in place.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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If I was able to quit and not need my salary, I sure would, as my job is making me sick too.But Im the main income, so I cant quit

See how your interview goes, then put in notice.

I know how it is when you can't stand working another minute at your job.

Best wishes.

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pthelper777 has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ED/Trauma/Field Case Manager.

55 Posts; 2,519 Profile Views

Oh gosh DannibeeRN, your scenario would just be ideal for me! I work nights so I tend to get teary-eyed when its time to go, not only because I'm miserable, but also because I hate having to leave my family at dinner time. Thank you so much for your insight!! And best wishes to you as well!

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pthelper777 has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ED/Trauma/Field Case Manager.

55 Posts; 2,519 Profile Views

If I was able to quit and not need my salary, I sure would, as my job is making me sick too.But Im the main income, so I cant quit

See how your interview goes, then put in notice.

I know how it is when you can't stand working another minute at your job.

Best wishes.

I'm holding on to my resignation letter until I have that interview next week. Thank you so much for your insight! I really appreciate it!

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pthelper777 has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ED/Trauma/Field Case Manager.

55 Posts; 2,519 Profile Views

As an "older" nurse myself in my 40s I want to put out that it is harder to find a job when you are in your 40s. Even though you are still more like a new grade in terms of payment (and therefore affordable), it might turn out to be difficult. Of course they are not allowed to age-discriminate but reality tells other stories.

It is easier to find a job when you have one but as already written above - only you know when you can't take it anymore.

I totally get it and am aware. Thank you!

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 317,362 Profile Views

By any chance are you working for the county in Ventura??!
According to OP's profile, she is across the country in New Jersey. However, I know all about Ventura County since I was born and raised in Oxnard.

Anyhow, back to the OP's question...it is easier to obtain a job when a person already has a job. There are several rationales behind this phenomenon. Good luck to you...

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RunnerNurse09 is a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg/ ER/ homecare.

185 Posts; 3,735 Profile Views

Er nursing has a great rate of burn out. I worked in the er after having been a tech in the er years ago. Loved er medicine, hated literally being ill all the time (viruses, bacteria illnesses) and other staff was sick all the time as well. It interfered with my non work life. I had no job lined up when I left and was fine, found another job I loved. If you can afford it and it is literally making you ill from stress, leave. Nursing has so many routes you can choose from, you will find one that you love. Best of luck.

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Jensmom7 has 36 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1,907 Posts; 11,300 Profile Views

Someone else on another thread recently mentioned getting unemployment after resigning. I'm certainly no expert on unemployment, but since when can you collect unemployment for choosing to resign a job? How does that work?

From what I've read, if you quit "with good cause" you may be eligible for unemployment. However, each state determines what constitutes "good cause".

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 317,362 Profile Views

since when can you collect unemployment for choosing to resign a job? How does that work?
I voluntarily resigned from a fast food job as a 17-year-old in 1998 and was awarded unemployment compensation. I resigned because my shift supervisor, a 19-year-old male, was making obscene comments to me and it created a hostile environment that led to constructive dismissal.

I also received unemployment compensation after resigning from a machinist position at a paper products factory back in 2004. The job was located 120 miles from my residence and the commute was unbearable. The unemployment administrative judge was convinced that I sought out every possible option before submitting my notice of resignation.

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dannibeeRN has 6 years experience.

58 Posts; 2,234 Profile Views

Someone else on another thread recently mentioned getting unemployment after resigning. I'm certainly no expert on unemployment, but since when can you collect unemployment for choosing to resign a job? How does that work?

I had to leave the previous position because of the distance from my home and because I had no one to watch my kids at night (husband also worked nights). Because of these facts, I was eligible for unemployment benefits.

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littlelimabean01 has 5 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Geriatrics, Trach Care, Diabetes.

69 Posts; 2,648 Profile Views

You are making the right choice do not worry. If your job is making you physically ill, YOU MUST LEAVE! We are nurses, promoting health is one of our many job aspects. If you feel that bad you are no good to anyone including your family, which I can bet support you leaving. Something is terribly wrong with the facility if that kind of turn over is happening. Please don't think you are a bad or selfish person for quitting. I did this to myself back in 2011 when I quit nursing and I have never been the same since. God Bless You.

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kentnurse97 has 19 years experience and specializes in Medical Surgical and step down units.

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I sincerely feel your pain. I have been in positions that were far too demanding and required me to be on call 24/7 and had very little staffing. That is not the way it is everywhere, although, being short staffed is becoming the norm. I pray for all nurses to find their "home" in nursing. I am at home in the VA system and I work with a group of dedicated nurses. We are continually short staffed but we manage to pitch together to get things done. Baths are not done, but the critical work of Nursing is. Keep looking until you find your Home! As a Christian, I would encourage to seek God's plan for your life, this whole situation may just be a passing thing and will get better. We also have lost 6 new nurses on our unit, most because they thought they wouldn't have to work and soon became discouraged by the short staffing. I am not afraid of work, I work as many hours as I can, but then I am working in my "home" away from home. Please find that place for yourself and start to enjoy the wonderful profession of Nursing. My hat is off to you for going back to school and seeking your dream. I didn't get to be a Nurse until I was 48 and I am now in my 19th year. God bless you as you seek your opportunities.

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pthelper777 has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ED/Trauma/Field Case Manager.

55 Posts; 2,519 Profile Views

I sincerely feel your pain. I have been in positions that were far too demanding and required me to be on call 24/7 and had very little staffing. That is not the way it is everywhere, although, being short staffed is becoming the norm. I pray for all nurses to find their "home" in nursing. I am at home in the VA system and I work with a group of dedicated nurses. We are continually short staffed but we manage to pitch together to get things done. Baths are not done, but the critical work of Nursing is. Keep looking until you find your Home! As a Christian, I would encourage to seek God's plan for your life, this whole situation may just be a passing thing and will get better. We also have lost 6 new nurses on our unit, most because they thought they wouldn't have to work and soon became discouraged by the short staffing. I am not afraid of work, I work as many hours as I can, but then I am working in my "home" away from home. Please find that place for yourself and start to enjoy the wonderful profession of Nursing. My hat is off to you for going back to school and seeking your dream. I didn't get to be a Nurse until I was 48 and I am now in my 19th year. God bless you as you seek your opportunities.

Thank you so much for your insight and wisdom! I too am a devout Christian and believe that the Lord placed nursing on my heart years ago, while in high school. I pray and seek His counsel continually and am really torn about leaving. I think this may be a trial that will help me grow for His plan. But it is draining and its taking a physical toll on my body & my mind.

I did not get the job I interviewed for. I will continue to chug along where I am and will continue to learn & hopefully grow into the person He is creating me to be. All for His kingdom.

Thank you & God Bless @Kentnurse97

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