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Jensmom7 BSN, RN

Hospice
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Jensmom7 has 36 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

Got my BSN way back in the olden days (1979). After I graduated, I would keep a stack of resumes in my car, and drop them off at various places. This was before on-line only applications, when you could walk into the Personnel Office and actually get to talk to a living, breathing person. One day, I was out running errands and decided to stop in at one of the local hospitals. I filled out an application, and when I turned it in, the nice lady in Personnel asked me if I would be interested in Pediatrics-they were getting ready to open a shiny new Peds wing. I was dressed in shorts and a t-shirt, with my hair tied back in a scarf (hadn't anticipated having an interview). I thought for about half a second and said "Sure!" Went to see the Head Nurse (that's what Unit Managers were called back then), we talked for about 30 minutes, and I walked out with my first Nursing job. I was 22. So began my lifelong journey in the craziness that is Nursing. I'm entering the downside of my career now, after 36 years. Hospice is what I do now, and what I hope to be doing when it's time to hang up my stethoscope. I take my job very seriously. What I refuse to take too seriously is myself. I have a strange sense of humor sometimes, and believe that sometimes you have to laugh or you'll cry.

Jensmom7's Latest Activity

  1. Jensmom7

    C'Mon Now!

    Check with the school, sometimes they'll order extras just for a situation like this. Hope you can find one!!
  2. Jensmom7

    Ridiculous medical mistakes on TV

    While that isn't what usually happens, sometimes people will have what we call their "last hurrah", where they wake up, eat, visit with friends and family, and then die peacefully. One of my patients had been lethargic for a few days, but perked up when the last of her relatives arrived. She had a nice visit with everyone, told them she wanted Colonel Sanders for dinner. They got her a two piece, she ate every bite, then a few hours later, fell asleep and never woke up.
  3. Jensmom7

    C'Mon Now!

    If she's in an abusive environment, she may have wanted to avoid the ER because they ask all kinds of embarrassing questions. Especially if she has a history of "unfortunate accidents". That's sad. Have to admit though, I did laugh and give the story a gold star. Yeah, I'm goin' to Hell.
  4. Jensmom7

    Cell phone in your thigh?

    I just flashed on the South Park episode when Cartman was abducted by aliens and farted an 80 foot satellite dish out of his butt...[emoji33]
  5. Jensmom7

    Cell phone in your thigh?

    Dogen, you may be on to something. I keep my work and cell phones in my jacket pocket, and get that feeling frequently. It isn't a muscle twitch, it's an actual vibrating sensation, along my outer thigh.
  6. Jensmom7

    Disrespectful patient

    There's a time and a place to have someone face the consequences of their actions. This wasn't it. By setting up a you-against-him atmosphere, and lecturing him in front of his mother (did you really think she was going to thank you? That's a family dynamic you aren't going to get close to unraveling in an acute care setting), what you did was ensure that he wasn't going to tell you anything, and mom was going to request another nurse. You say he wasn't really trying to kill himself. Maybe not, but something happened to induce the behavior. That's what the Psychiatrist and counsellors are for. Believe me, over the years I've had rude, obnoxious, and snotty patients and family members. I've practically shredded my tongue at times holding reactions in. Yes, he was rude and disrespectful. Sounds like it's pretty much his MO.
  7. Jensmom7

    What is your Nursing Kryptonite?

    Using the quote feature lets people know to whom you are responding. Call me lazy, but I have no desire to re-read 7 pages of posts to figure it out.
  8. Jensmom7

    "Smart" students make bad nurses?

    Y'know, this thread could have easily turned into a train wreck. I'm so glad it didn't. Almost 100 replies, all of them intelligent and well thought out.
  9. Jensmom7

    What is your Nursing Kryptonite?

    [emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33][emoji33]
  10. Jensmom7

    Your Favorite Nursing Job

    Admission Nurse for Home Heath. SO nice to be able to tell toxic families "Your nurse's name is ______ and after I give her report she will call you and let you know when she will be here". I hated Home Health Case Management. Too many people gaming the system (this was back in the 90s), too many patients who just didn't give a hoot.
  11. Except for one thing. Morphine, as used in Hospice, doesn't have a "maximum allowed" dose. I've given Roxanol (short acting Morphine) 10mg SL hourly for cases of extreme respiratory distress.
  12. Jensmom7

    I feel like nursing school didn't prepare me for work

    [ATTACH]21600[/ATTACH] This pretty much sums it up.
  13. Jensmom7

    What is your Nursing Kryptonite?

    Really long fingernails on guys give me the jeebies.
  14. Jensmom7

    "Smart" students make bad nurses?

    My school is on my resumé (go Billikens!!) but it really hasn't ever been a topic of conversation.
  15. Jensmom7

    "Smart" students make bad nurses?

    Transcript?? Seriously? I walked into HR, filled out an application, was invited then and there to interview with the head nurse of the just about to be opened Pediatric unit, we talked for about 45 minutes, and I walked out with a job. Oh, and I was wearing jeans and a t-shirt because I just stopped at that hospital in between running errands and really had no thoughts of interviewing that day. Like I said, it was almost 40 years ago. There weren't 200 nurses competing for 20 positions like there is now. Back then, you had an interview and you were either offered a position or you weren't. Back then there were three ways to become an RN: Hospital based programs (which were rapidly being phased out), two year ADN programs at the local Junior College (Community College now) and four year BSN programs at a University. Employers pretty much knew what they were getting back then. I graduated from a well known University with a respected BSN program, which the prospective employer saw when she looked at my application. Now, with for profit diploma mill schools on every other block, it's more of a crap shoot. Especially since so many have been fooled into believing that there's a Nursing shortage. Employers have to have something to weed out the overflow of applicants, so they're using GPAs to do it.
  16. Jensmom7

    "Smart" students make bad nurses?

    Things may have changed in almost 40 years, but when I interviewed for my first Nursing job, the subject of where I went to school and what my grades were never came up.