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RN to BSN or straight to BSN??

Hem0043 Hem0043 (New) New

I am 20 years old and have finished almoast all of my prerequisites. Last year I made the mistake of only applying to one BSN program and was denied. Now, I am facing two options and have no idea which route would be better for me.

1. I got accepted to a university for the fall, where I was going to retake a few sciences and also get a minor in social work to bring up my gpa. Then I would apply to lots of BSN programs. This route is appealing to me because I am already half way to my BSN, but I am also worried about getting denied from programs again. I have Bs in anatomy and physiology, and am worried that I may not bring my gpa up enough or do well enough on the TEAS this semester to make up for some of my grades.....of course I am going to do my absolute best, I am just very nervous about it all at the moment.

2. Get my CNA this fall and start an ADN program in the spring, then do a bridge RN to BSN program. I am not particularly worried about finances or time. I am just trying to find the most surefire way to eventually get that BSN.

A few other things, I know that both ADN and BSN programs are very tough. I am currently struggling with anxiety problems that I know I need to take care of, so I wasnt sure if it would be less stressful to start with the CNA license and work my way to a BSN? ONn the other hand, I don't want fear of being denied again from a BSN program to completely dictate my decision.

Thanks so much for the input on this!!

Hi!!! I'm in the same boat actually. I've been struggling to figure out what my plan is going to get the BSN as fast as possible. No one hires ADN's anymore they all want the bachelor's and it's so hard and competitive to get into BSN programs. I know people that have a 3.9 GPA that didn't even get accepted so I'm freaking out lol what is your science GPA and overall GPA?

9 hours ago, Sarah McCammon said:

Hi!!! I'm in the same boat actually. I've been struggling to figure out what my plan is going to get the BSN as fast as possible. No one hires ADN's anymore they all want the bachelor's and it's so hard and competitive to get into BSN programs. I know people that have a 3.9 GPA that didn't even get accepted so I'm freaking out lol what is your science GPA and overall GPA?

I'd calm down, and call the heads of the nursing programs at schools you want. Don't focus so much on your GPA. There's not THAT many people with a perfect 4.0. There's usually more to why they're getting turned down. Talk to the people running the programs. Meet with them, bring transcripts and stuff, and talk to them about what you need to do to get into the program.

Not sure what my science gpa is but overall its about a 3.4. Im not going to worry too much about it though because I am hoping to bring it up. I think what confuses me alot about all of this is that I could go one way and get a minor, which would be really helpful for me, or I could go the other way and end up having two years of nursing experience before I start working with my BSN. Both of these options sound great, so its difficult choosing which way to go. I know that most people want you to have your BSN nowadays, but if i went the ADN route I would go straight for the bachelors degree afterwards....

I would just apply to both and see what happens! I think im just going crazy because i waited like 8 years to finally go back to school so now i feel like I'm on a time crunch which is ridiculous lol You know what will be best for you when the time comes I'm sure you'll do great whichever route you choose!

DowntheRiver

Specializes in Urgent Care, Oncology.

I don't understand what is stopping you from applying to both? If the BSN program doesn't work out but the ADN program does you can just transfer.

vampiregirl, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice.

I'm not convinced there is one "right" answer to this question.

I graduated with my ASN and worked for several years as an RN. I went back to school to complete my BSN. My work experience made some of the material "more" relevant (because I had experiences to apply it to) and I got so much benefit from interactions with my cohort members. I paid for school as I went along; this route made the most financial sense for me.

I know others who got their BSN before they started working in the field. I've talked to several nurses who are glad they did it this way because they could focus on their careers and family without having school thrown into an often complicated equation.

I think evaluating one's circumstances and the opportunities available to them would be the best option.

vampiregirl, BSN, RN

Specializes in Hospice.

On 8/13/2019 at 1:55 PM, Sarah McCammon said:

No one hires ADN's anymore they all want the bachelor's and it's so hard and competitive to get into BSN programs.

This may be true in some areas. And for a while I saw this in the area I live. Now I'm seeing more institutions hiring ASN prepared nurses with a stipulation that they must complete a BSN within so many years (typically 3-5). Typically the hospital offers a tuition reimbursement or tuition assistance.

Also, there are a variety of RN to BSN options.

Apply to both! Ideally, you could go right into a traditional BSN program since you said time and money aren't big concerns. There are also some great ADN programs, many of which have contracts with universities for their students to have automatic acceptance into RN to BSN upon graduation. They're very unique experiences even though they theoretically teach the same material. (RN to BSN courses often cover the non-clinical material in a less extensive way than pre-licensure programs since they're designed for working professionals.) I wouldn't retake a science where you earned a B. Some programs may not accept repeated courses for grade calculations, and I think many strong students earn Bs in A&P. Always check the NCLEX pass rates of programs before applying. You want something >90%, preferably >95%. Good luck!

Edited by FacultyRN

Hoosier_RN, MSN

Specializes in dialysis.

On 8/13/2019 at 1:55 PM, Sarah McCammon said:

No one hires ADN's anymore they all want the bachelor's and it's so hard and competitive to get into BSN programs.

This is area dependent, some areas hire ADNs into acute settings, you just have to be willing to go there.

@Hem0043Go to a community college to get your prereqs done, then apply everywhere. If you can get into BSN right off and can afford the program, great. If not, do the ADN program and then bridge to BSN, often a much cheaper option. Look at what your location hires as well to know what you're looking at down the road. It doesn't have to be either/or. Good luck with your future plans!

if you could afford BSN, then just go straight for BSN. I was really eager to go straight for BSN, but being an international student makes the tuition fee very very very expensive. So I went for ADN.. it's really a struggle to get a job with ADN in an acute hospital, unless you're willing to travel far from where you live (I am a horrible driver so I know my limit).

However, if you go through ADN program first, it's not the end of the world, either. You can always bridge to BSN which was usually cheaper than go straight for BSN.

Do your research. Does your area hire ADNs? If not, then you may want to go for your BSN. I know it sucks going to an ADN program knowing you want a BSN but sometimes that's how life works. I went through a similar situation but luckily my area hires ADNs and I had no issue finding employment and I started my BSN program a months after getting the ADN. There are many different paths you can take, but do your research and stay motivated. Good luck to you.

CKPM2RN, ASN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency/Med-Tele.

On 8/13/2019 at 10:55 AM, Sarah McCammon said:

No one hires ADN's anymore they all want the bachelor's

Bachelor's preferred does not always mean mandatory. I, and several of my friends have ADNs and yet we are all employed by local hospitals.

Get your ADN then get your employer to pay for your bridge program if you can.

AutumnApple

Specializes in M/S, Pulmonary, Travel, Homecare, Psych..

I think for this question, flipping conventional wisdom on it's head works best.

Usually I believe in looking at the long term goals and making appropriate short term goals based on them. If I like outcome A, I make a plan with goals that will steer me towards that outcome. If I like outcome B more..........same thing, different goals along the way.

For this situation though, I think letting the short term goals be your guide is more helpful. *To me* there really is no outcome A and outcome B here. Either way, the end point is a BSN.

So, choose the path that suits you best. The one you're most likely to finish and/or the one that will cost you least..............all sorts of variables to consider. Prioritize said variables and pick the path that accommodates your priorities best.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

Apply to both. "Don't put all your eggs is one basket," as the old saying goes.

Who knows? You might not really have a choice as you might not be accepted by both schools. In that case, go to whichever one accepts you.

If you do get accepted by both schools ... is one of significantly better quality than the other? Does your gut tell you that you will be happier at one than the other? If not, go for the BSN for all the reasons previous posters have said.

On 8/15/2019 at 11:54 AM, nalie2 said:

Do your research. Does your area hire ADNs? If not, then you may want to go for your BSN. I know it sucks going to an ADN program knowing you want a BSN but sometimes that's how life works. I went through a similar situation but luckily my area hires ADNs and I had no issue finding employment and I started my BSN program a months after getting the ADN. There are many different paths you can take, but do your research and stay motivated. Good luck to you.

Hey nalie do you mind sharing your story about your conviction case to me my email is ignaciomayorga510@gmail.com

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