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Riots in Minneapolis

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pixierose, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED, psych. Has 4 years experience.

“In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends” - MLK

That’s what helped get us here. This has happened multiple times every year - Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Breonna Taylor, Tamir Rice, Walter Scott, Dominique Clayton ... MLK was over half a century ago.

We now have a leader who is stoking the flames of racism for personal benefit.

ladyinwaiting

Has 5 years experience.

On 5/28/2020 at 7:15 PM, TomPaine said:

Remember when MLK jr said, "To further the cause of social justice go down the street and rob and loot your neighbors." Me neither, because it didn't happen.

I fully sympathize with the situation in Minneapolis and the death of George Floyd. I believe in due process, but after seeing the video I was sickened by the police officer's actions. He did not need to have his knee of the neck of a man who was handcuffed and held down by two other officers. His excessive force caused the death of Floyd. He was fired and he will be arrested and charged. There will be a court case and evidence will be presented and a verdict delivered.

That's how our system works. It does not work by robbing your neighbors and destroying their livelihoods. There is no cause that is furthered by the looter's actions. There is no traction gained. Their actions haven't changed policy and ensured that justice was done. It was simply a group of people who took the opportunity to steal and destroy for personal gain. The looters are selfish because they took some of the spotlight away from George Floyd and now the nation sees another example people run amok without furthering their agenda or making any positive strides.

If the looters actually cared about Floyd or the social cause they speak of they would take civil action. It worked in the past and it would work again. The Montgomery bus boycott changed policy. But it wasn't easy, it was certainly harder than breaking glass and stealing a tv. And therein lies the problem. It's easy to riot, it's easy to steal and claim "XYZ caused me to loot." It's hard to organize like-minded people and bring about change. It takes time, grit and determination. Think how much better things would be if the thousands of people who looted and rioted got together and voted for change. They could elect someone who could enact policies to prevent something like this from happening again. That's how our system works, not by destroying your own neighborhood.

The officers looted someone's life so I REALLY think it's OK to loot sneakers if that guarantees visibility as the entire world is watching. I am sorry but if you're complaining about looting then you're part of the problem.

IMG_2127.jpg

pixierose, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED, psych. Has 4 years experience.

40 minutes ago, ladyinwaiting said:

The officers looted someone's life so I REALLY think it's OK to loot sneakers if that guarantees visibility as the entire world is watching. I am sorry but if you're complaining about looting then you're part of the problem.

IMG_2127.jpg

Amen.

Hence, the damn silence. Every time it happens, oh the thoughts and prayers and “change.”

But nothing.ever.changes. And it happens again.

It’s damn powerful to see protestors take a knee. To see police kneel with them. To see them march, at times together. I’ve seen a lot of videos where police responded in force to these protests - which were PEACEFUL at the time. And then to think of the protesters in MI, with assault rifles - that’s OK. No force, handled with kid gloves. With a president who hasn’t yet addressed the nation, who puts “” around protestors, yet says that the protestors in MI are fine people. Colin Kaepernick tried a peaceful protest - people wanted him kicked off the field, told he hated America, with Trump saying that he, and others kneeling, “shouldn’t be in this country.”

The man called out for his mama. I heard that cry deep down and it makes ME want to set something on fire. Jesus.

Edited by pixierose

cyc0sys

Specializes in EMS, LTC, Sub-acute Rehab. Has 6 years experience.

On 5/28/2020 at 7:38 PM, toomuchbaloney said:

If only police had shown up with tear gas and rubber bullets when armed protesters crowded into capital buildings...

Nope.

But when police openly murder a man on the street, in broad daylight, lie about it, write a false report, and get called out on the racist violence by the public with emotional BUT UNARMED protest one can count on the police showing up in full riot gear... ready to do battle to defend their right to abuse citizens. Police can kneel on a black man till he dies but a black man can't kneel during the national anthem in Trumplandia.

You are under some delusion that the system you are talking about works for all the people.

The lesson here is simple: A polite society, is an armed society.

People who know the system isn't working for them take responsibility for their own personal safety and security. Much like the armed people who stood guard to protect their businesses during the riots. Remember, the police have no duty to protect anyone (Warren vs the District of Columbia ).

Chauvin has only been charged with third-degree murder (11-13 years) and second-degree manslaughter (3-5 years). They have to prove he intended to kill Floyd in order for the third-degree murder charge to stick. Doubt that will happen.

If it even goes to court, he'll take a plea bargain to manslaughter. The police union lawyers will drag this out until it cools down. Probably won't do more than 5 years, in protected custody away from general population. Under Minnesota Law, he's only required to serve 2/3 of the sentence so it might even be less.

The other 3 co-conspirators haven't been charged with anything. Doubt they'll be prosecuted due to the Doctrine of Qualified Immunity (Harlow v. Fitzgerald).

You don't get justice in court, only law.

toomuchbaloney

Has 43 years experience.

23 minutes ago, cyc0sys said:

The lesson here is simple: A polite society, is an armed society.

People who know the system isn't working for them take responsibility for their own personal safety and security. Much like the armed people who stood guard to protect their businesses during the riots. Remember, the police have no duty to protect anyone (Warren vs the District of Columbia ).

Chauvin has only been charged with third-degree murder (11-13 years) and second-degree manslaughter (3-5 years). They have to prove he intended to kill Floyd in order for the third-degree murder charge to stick. Doubt that will happen.

If it even goes to court, he'll take a plea bargain to manslaughter. The police union lawyers will drag this out until it cools down. Probably won't do more than 5 years, in protected custody away from general population. Under Minnesota Law, he's only required to serve 2/3 of the sentence so it might even be less.

The other 3 co-conspirators haven't been charged with anything. Doubt they'll be prosecuted due to the Doctrine of Qualified Immunity (Harlow v. Fitzgerald).

You don't get justice in court, only law.

Black people don't get any justice then...in the courts or in the law. Too bad for them, I guess.

The white supremacists would love for this to escalate into a race war. The only war we are going to have is against their continued power and influence in "polite" society.

LovingPeds, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Clinical Pediatrics; Maternal-Child Educator. Has 11 years experience.

1 hour ago, ladyinwaiting said:

The officers looted someone's life so I REALLY think it's OK to loot sneakers if that guarantees visibility as the entire world is watching. I am sorry but if you're complaining about looting then you're part of the problem.

IMG_2127.jpg

I disagree. Not with the being more upset over the looting part, because everyone should be more upset that a man lost his life, but that the visibility that the looting brings will change things. I live near a location famous for the Civil Rights movement. Every year near the anniversary of Bloody Sunday, people from all across the United States gather to celebrate the Voting Rights Act. Everyone from Oprah, Clinton (both), Bush (both), Obama and his daughters, to a dozens of other politicians and celebrities have come at some point to speak, smile, and give lip-service. When all is said and done, they take the cameras and leave the area with their failing schools, food desserts, and poverty. The businesses pulled out years ago. Even the local Waffle House (Waffle House Index anyone?) closes to all but call-in/take-out on weekend nights due to the violence and crime - and this was before Coronavirus shut things down.

Yes, the looting is a problem because it's short-sighted and will only harm this community. I promise you when the cameras all turn away, you're going to see a community that is going to struggle. There was a complex building 200 units of affordable housing that was burned down. I'm sure the builders had it insured, but claiming has the potential to raise their insurance rates - not to mention all the supplies, time, and manpower that has to be repaid to restart the rebuilding process. Businesses that were there may decide that it is not in their interest to reopen due to concerns over loss prevention. This reduces people's ability to buy clothing and even food locally. The police building that was burned was most likely built with tax payer funding. That will have to be rebuilt with at least some of it coming from tax payer expense. This reduces the funds available to other building projects and programs which could have helped the community.

I don't give a flip about a pair of sneakers. I care because I know what happens when the cameras go and the world moves on leaving the town's citizens worse off than they were before.

PersonBehindAScreen

Specializes in Non-Nursing Student.

On 5/28/2020 at 6:15 PM, TomPaine said:

Remember when MLK jr said, "To further the cause of social justice go down the street and rob and loot your neighbors." Me neither, because it didn't happen.

I fully sympathize with the situation in Minneapolis and the death of George Floyd. I believe in due process, but after seeing the video I was sickened by the police officer's actions. He did not need to have his knee of the neck of a man who was handcuffed and held down by two other officers. His excessive force caused the death of Floyd. He was fired and he will be arrested and charged. There will be a court case and evidence will be presented and a verdict delivered.

That's how our system works. It does not work by robbing your neighbors and destroying their livelihoods. There is no cause that is furthered by the looter's actions. There is no traction gained. Their actions haven't changed policy and ensured that justice was done. It was simply a group of people who took the opportunity to steal and destroy for personal gain. The looters are selfish because they took some of the spotlight away from George Floyd and now the nation sees another example people run amok without furthering their agenda or making any positive strides.

If the looters actually cared about Floyd or the social cause they speak of they would take civil action. It worked in the past and it would work again. The Montgomery bus boycott changed policy. But it wasn't easy, it was certainly harder than breaking glass and stealing a tv. And therein lies the problem. It's easy to riot, it's easy to steal and claim "XYZ caused me to loot." It's hard to organize like-minded people and bring about change. It takes time, grit and determination. Think how much better things would be if the thousands of people who looted and rioted got together and voted for change. They could elect someone who could enact policies to prevent something like this from happening again. That's how our system works, not by destroying your own neighborhood.

Here is what MLK said about riots:

"Certain conditions continue to exist in our society, which must be condemned as vigorously as we condemn riots. But in the final analysis, a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it that America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last few years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality and humanity. And so in a real sense our nation’s summers of riots are caused by our nation’s winters of delay. And as long as America postpones justice, we stand in the position of having these recurrences of violence and riots over and over again. Social justice and progress are the absolute guarantors of riot prevention"

The fact that you are so sure that court will happen and a verdict will be delivered and you speak of how "the system" should work shows that you have failed to see what's wrong with the system. How many times has this garbage happened and a court case was never even started?! Yes there are bad apples out there taking advantage but the response to the riots is by beating on the people still peacefully protesting? Go watch the videos! Several videos of rioters doing their thing unopposed while the peaceful protestors get sprayed, gassed, arrested, ran over, reporters blinded by rubber bullets, etc. These riots could have been prevented if our authority figures would do the right thing without needing Twitter to be flooded with videos making sure we keep their officers in check. And I'll throw in another quote from MLK:

"I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to "order" than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: "I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action"; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man's freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a "more convenient season." Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection."

toomuchbaloney

Has 43 years experience.

12 minutes ago, LovingPeds said:

I disagree. Not with the being more upset over the looting part, because everyone should be more upset that a man lost his life, but that the visibility that the looting brings will change things. I live near a location famous for the Civil Rights movement. Every year near the anniversary of Bloody Sunday, people from all across the United States gather to celebrate the Voting Rights Act. Everyone from Oprah, Clinton (both), Bush (both), Obama and his daughters, to a dozens of other politicians and celebrities have come at some point to speak, smile, and give lip-service. When all is said and done, they take the cameras and leave the area with their failing schools, food desserts, and poverty. The businesses pulled out years ago. Even the local Waffle House (Waffle House Index anyone?) closes to all but call-in/take-out on weekend nights due to the violence and crime - and this was before Coronavirus shut things down.

Yes, the looting is a problem because it's short-sighted and will only harm this community. I promise you when the cameras all turn away, you're going to see a community that is going to struggle. There was a complex building 200 units of affordable housing that was burned down. I'm sure the builders had it insured, but claiming has the potential to raise their insurance rates - not to mention all the supplies, time, and manpower that has to be repaid to restart the rebuilding process. Businesses that were there may decide that it is not in their interest to reopen due to concerns over loss prevention. This reduces people's ability to buy clothing and even food locally. The police building that was burned was most likely built with tax payer funding. That will have to be rebuilt with at least some of it coming from tax payer expense. This reduces the funds available to other building projects and programs which could have helped the community.

I don't give a flip about a pair of sneakers. I care because I know what happens when the cameras go and the world moves on leaving the town's citizens worse off than they were before.

I would suggest that the people intent upon burning buildings are seeking anarchy and mayhem. They want to justify a race war that begins in the streets between the police (significantly influenced by white supremacists)and angry citizens. Have you read any of the manifestos from the right wing crazies over the recent past?

Have you read this?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/07/us/politics/erik-prince-project-veritas.html

How much do you trust a bunch of lying kleptocrats?

LovingPeds, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Clinical Pediatrics; Maternal-Child Educator. Has 11 years experience.

2 minutes ago, toomuchbaloney said:

I would suggest that the people intent upon burning buildings are seeking anarchy and mayhem. They want to justify a race war that begins in the streets between the police (significantly influenced by white supremacists)and angry citizens. Have you read any of the manifestos from the right wing crazies over the recent past?

Have you read this?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/07/us/politics/erik-prince-project-veritas.html

How much do you trust a bunch of lying kleptocrats?

I don't trust anyone from either side of our political system if I'm honest. Every one of them (from both sides) has an agenda that puts themselves in a position to gain power (political, financial, or otherwise) usually at the expense of the general public. It's almost like picking out which apple is the least rotten. Right now, 'right wing crazies' and 'far left liberals' are so out of touch with the majority of the population who just want to live their lives with their family, friends, and neighbors in peace that it is unfathomable.

ladyinwaiting

Has 5 years experience.

1 hour ago, cyc0sys said:

The lesson here is simple: A polite society, is an armed society.

People who know the system isn't working for them take responsibility for their own personal safety and security. Much like the armed people who stood guard to protect their businesses during the riots. Remember, the police have no duty to protect anyone (Warren vs the District of Columbia ).

Chauvin has only been charged with third-degree murder (11-13 years) and second-degree manslaughter (3-5 years). They have to prove he intended to kill Floyd in order for the third-degree murder charge to stick. Doubt that will happen.

If it even goes to court, he'll take a plea bargain to manslaughter. The police union lawyers will drag this out until it cools down. Probably won't do more than 5 years, in protected custody away from general population. Under Minnesota Law, he's only required to serve 2/3 of the sentence so it might even be less.

The other 3 co-conspirators haven't been charged with anything. Doubt they'll be prosecuted due to the Doctrine of Qualified Immunity (Harlow v. Fitzgerald).

You don't get justice in court, only law.

So the autopsy report came out today, check out NYTimes. Death by asphyxiation. Different than what was previously claimed. 💔

ladyinwaiting

Has 5 years experience.

3 minutes ago, LovingPeds said:

I don't trust anyone from either side of our political system if I'm honest. Every one of them (from both sides) has an agenda that puts themselves in a position to gain power (political, financial, or otherwise) usually at the expense of the general public. It's almost like picking out which apple is the least rotten. Right now, 'right wing crazies' and 'far left liberals' are so out of touch with the majority of the population who just want to live their lives with their family, friends, and neighbors in peace that it is unfathomable.

Yes, for sure we all want to live life in peace. But for some reason black people STILL don't have that right. I am a white person by the way, however, I am not born in the US if that matters. I care about society and don't believe in capitalism and everyone for themselves type of attitude. I also think the American dream has been 100% destroyed. A lot has to change right now, this country is in a horrible place.

pixierose, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED, psych. Has 4 years experience.

19 minutes ago, LovingPeds said:

I disagree. Not with the being more upset over the looting part, because everyone should be more upset that a man lost his life, but that the visibility that the looting brings will change things. I live near a location famous for the Civil Rights movement. Every year near the anniversary of Bloody Sunday, people from all across the United States gather to celebrate the Voting Rights Act. Everyone from Oprah, Clinton (both), Bush (both), Obama and his daughters, to a dozens of other politicians and celebrities have come at some point to speak, smile, and give lip-service. When all is said and done, they take the cameras and leave the area with their failing schools, food desserts, and poverty. The businesses pulled out years ago. Even the local Waffle House (Waffle House Index anyone?) closes to all but call-in/take-out on weekend nights due to the violence and crime - and this was before Coronavirus shut things down.

Yes, the looting is a problem because it's short-sighted and will only harm this community. I promise you when the cameras all turn away, you're going to see a community that is going to struggle. There was a complex building 200 units of affordable housing that was burned down. I'm sure the builders had it insured, but claiming has the potential to raise their insurance rates - not to mention all the supplies, time, and manpower that has to be repaid to restart the rebuilding process. Businesses that were there may decide that it is not in their interest to reopen due to concerns over loss prevention. This reduces people's ability to buy clothing and even food locally. The police building that was burned was most likely built with tax payer funding. That will have to be rebuilt with at least some of it coming from tax payer expense. This reduces the funds available to other building projects and programs which could have helped the community.

I don't give a flip about a pair of sneakers. I care because I know what happens when the cameras go and the world moves on leaving the town's citizens worse off than they were before.

I read an article, and a quote stuck out - “People wanna say we’re destroying our own neighborhoods, we don’t own nothing out here!”

The Civil Rights movement lost its war despite winning a few battles. An entire people has been dominated through law, wages and yes - violence (as all these deaths of young black men has shown us).

You say it’s short sighted. But has anything worked? Businesses leave. But people keep dying, horrifically.