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Report or not when administrators have favorites

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by NeuroICU_RN NeuroICU_RN (New Member) New Member

238 Visitors; 9 Posts

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Report or not?

  1. 1. Report or not?

    • Report it to my admin
      5
    • Report it to BON
      4
    • Don’t report it
      21

30 members have participated

Been there,done that has 33 years experience and works as a case manager.

4 Followers; 68,583 Visitors; 6,203 Posts

Does it occur to you that nurses are human? Someone in her family died and she was in shock. Hopefully, YOU will never be required to do a "proper" hand off while you are in shock.

This is not a day shift/ night shift issue, this is a human compassion issue.... I do not see a shred of compassion in you.

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238 Visitors; 9 Posts

Report her to the BON??!!

I am sorry if I am wrong, but I get the impression there is more to it in your motivation to get this person in trouble. I get your frustration about getting a bad report, but I think you might be overreacting.

If I wanted to get this person in trouble, I would have reported her already and not be asking for advice.

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238 Visitors; 9 Posts

If you were that nurse in that same situation, how would you hope someone would handle this?

Personally I would be extending them quite a bit of grace. I hope you will consider doing so as well.

I HAVE been in her situation already and was not extended any grace. I was still required to work and when I questioned it, was told by the same administrators that gave her slack that "we don't know what to tell you".

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238 Visitors; 9 Posts

Does it occur to you that nurses are human? Someone in her family died and she was in shock. Hopefully, YOU will never be required to do a "proper" hand off while you are in shock.

This is not a day shift/ night shift issue, this is a human compassion issue.... I do not see a shred of compassion in you.

You're definitely entitled to your opinion about me, but you don't know me. I've been in this same situation before and I still gave report and ensured my patient was stable and handed off properly, regardless of how poor my report may have been and I always answered questions after I left work because it was still my patient.

I have no compassion? I've personally covered for several people for bereavement or emergencies, even if that made me work 6 nights in a row before. When things weren't done, I always tell them, "I'll take care of it, go take care of your family." I've taken on unsafe patient assignments so that nurses can leave for emergencies.

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238 Visitors; 9 Posts

If your unit is so corrupt, have you thought of looking for employment elsewhere?

Anytime favoritism has impacted my duties or schedule, I've just gotten out of dodge. I have found it is hard to prove favoritism and hard to get in favor of the favorites. Sometimes it is just best to move on.

Yes, I have and it's in the works.

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Have Nurse has 25 years experience and works as a A.D.O.N..

15 Articles; 7,721 Visitors; 713 Posts

This is where you actually get to use those nursing skills you were taught: Checking labs, previous notes, doing your own physical assessment, interviewing your patient (if you can,) reviewing the M.A.R., and speaking with your colleagues.

It was perfectly appropriate for the nurse who was on a family emergency not to respond. For HIPAA reasons you should know better than to text anyway.

Secondly, she wasn't irresponsible if she contacted the Admin and that person offered to help you by instructing you when should have known what to do anyway. She opted to speak to someone, not text you. Hence, she followed up the best she could. The responsibility lies with you and this other nurse who took her place.

Perhaps there was a safety issue here, but you could address this with "Risk Management" or the Pt. Rep if needed.

But don't you dare throw that grieving nurse under the bus! She did nothing wrong. You really do need to understand what "Patient Abandonment" really is before you go off have cocked.

I'm sorry. My dander is up and it really frosts my cookies to read about something like this.

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psu_213 has 6 years experience.

27,455 Visitors; 3,869 Posts

You're definitely entitled to your opinion about me, but you don't know me. I've been in this same situation before and I still gave report and ensured my patient was stable and handed off properly, regardless of how poor my report may have been and I always answered questions after I left work because it was still my patient.

I don't know your exact situation, I don't know her exact situation. I do know that not everyone is going to react the same even to the exact same issue. Maybe in the immediacy of it, L thought that her life was thrown into turmoil. Maybe she just doesn't have the coping skills that you have. Maybe you handled your situation well, and she did a shoddy job. I have to be blunt--either way you are not showing much compassion and understanding in this situation. I'm not saying she was right to not give report and/or ensure safe handoff, but, given the circumstances, consider giving her the benefit of the doubt.

2 other thoughts:

Given that going to the BON is one of your options--are you sure you don't have some other axe to grind with her? I understand that you have issues with this person and with you unit in general, but does it rise to the issue of going to the BON? If it was someone with whom you did not have other issues, would you even consider this as a course of action?

Second, you need to give up the issue that she did not call/text you back. I understand that you were still in communication with the unit when you had to leave in the middle of your shift; I can say that I would not be available for any calls from work when I am in the period immediately after finding out that a loved one died.

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238 Visitors; 9 Posts

Let me just clarify this for everyone:

I did NOT report her nor go off half-cocked running to the BON. The only reason the BON is even on there is because my entire administration protect each other, and I can't trust any of them. So who else do I go to? These were my thoughts during the whole process:

1) I think it was wrong that this patient did not have a nurse because the patient was definitely sick. Had something gone wrong suddenly, who would have been the one responsible? I'm not taking responsibility if something bad had happened. Had it been your own family member and you found out they had no care for the time, how would you have felt? I think there was definitely a lapse in this patient's care and I definitely think this is a patient safety issue.

2) I have NO animosity towards this nurse whatsoever. NONE. We joke around, we laugh. We're not friends because I only interact with her during change of shift, but I've never had any issues with her. She's an incredibly smart nurse and she's damn good at what she does. So there is absolutely no reason for me to even want to get her in trouble.

3) she lost someone and that is something I wholeheartedly understand. I am truly sorry for her loss and that's why didn't impulsively start writing emails or filing complaints. It could've been her kids that were hurt for all I know (it wasn't), so I definitely wasn't going to add insult to injury. I even hated that I had to text her because I really did not want to bother her. My only need to even text was that there were still some questions left unanswered about the patient that were not documented, and that would have directed us to what to do next for the patient.

4) in regards to everyone saying we should've looked through labs/notes/etc. WE DID. The key point here is that we were asking about things that were NOT DOCUMENTED. Hence why I felt it was important that she should've responded and why simply hearing from admin to "look at the notes" was insufficient. And in regards to HIPAA, simply asking the name of who report was given to on patient in room #__ is not releasing any personal info.

I guess maybe I should've rephrased the original post differently, because I'm realizing that it sounds like I am trying to put the blame completely on her, but that's not the case. There was just a lack of accountability here. I do feel that the ball was dropped here somewhere and if it were my own family member that was the patient, I would've been upset at the lapse in care.

I felt that I corrected the situation the best I could and made do with what I had. We handled it.

I was upset initially because I was walking into another situation I had to clean up, and it happens more frequently than I would like on this unit. But in a nutshell: I'm over it. I'm not doing anything about it. I have no grudges or ill will towards this nurse. I've already let it go.

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not.done.yet has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Professional Development Specialist.

4 Followers; 43,028 Visitors; 5,240 Posts

I HAVE been in her situation already and was not extended any grace. I was still required to work and when I questioned it, was told by the same administrators that gave her slack that "we don't know what to tell you".

So is this then about revenge? Why wouldn't you want better for her than you had since you know how hard it was?

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4,721 Visitors; 171 Posts

Wow. A few years ago, working in neuro critical care, I got a call about a true family emergency - not going into details, but it was horrendous, to the point that I was sobbing on the phone, begging my family member to "just hold on, I'll be there as soon as I can, please, it will be ok, I'm coming RIGHT NOW!" The charge heard me in the break room, said, "just go. NOW, your [family member] is more important than this. Go."

I threw my papers at her, yelled, "everyone is a full code, thank you, I'm so, so sorry!" and ran out the door. I didn't give report. She had full access to the computer, notes, what meds my patients had and hadn't received, diagnoses, etc. Should I have been reported to the BON for abandoning my patients??

I hadn't called off in over 6 years, never left early, never came in late. Ever. Sometimes family comes first. I hope that when, inevitably, you have a true emergency, your co-workers extend the same professionalism, understanding, compassion and competence that mine did to me.

Good luck finding that support if you choose to "report" a fellow nurse in crisis.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience and works as a case manager.

4 Followers; 68,583 Visitors; 6,203 Posts

You're definitely entitled to your opinion about me, but you don't know me. I've been in this same situation before and I still gave report and ensured my patient was stable and handed off properly, regardless of how poor my report may have been and I always answered questions after I left work because it was still my patient.

I have no compassion? I've personally covered for several people for bereavement or emergencies, even if that made me work 6 nights in a row before. When things weren't done, I always tell them, "I'll take care of it, go take care of your family." I've taken on unsafe patient assignments so that nurses can leave for emergencies.

I always tell them, "I'll take care of it, go take care of your family." So what is different here?

I got a call from my father while on duty.My mother just dropped dead. My instinct was.. I gotta still give report. My coworkers took over... told me not to worry about anything and took me aside while my husband could come and take over.. as i could not drive or even think.

Screw report.. no longer relevant.

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8 Followers; 21,837 Visitors; 2,829 Posts

I was upset initially because I was walking into another situation I had to clean up, and it happens more frequently than I would like on this unit. But in a nutshell: I'm over it. I'm not doing anything about it. I have no grudges or ill will towards this nurse. I've already let it go.

You sound like a conscientious nurse, and your feelings and reactions are understandable. And now you've made the right choice (in my opinion).

It was a choice to take the high road by not treating someone else poorly just because other completely different people have treated you poorly.

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