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"Diploma Nurse preferable"

I've seen this is 2 adds in the newspaper, looking for nurses in management positions. "Diploma nurse preferabel". Any one else seen this?

odd, if it were one ad i would think "error" and they meant "degree"

..other than that perhaps a means to save money, by not hiring a BSN?

odd, if it were one ad i would think "error" and they meant "degree"

..other than that perhaps a means to save money, by not hiring a BSN?

Or perhaps they feel they are better prepared.

Lacie, BSN, RN

Specializes in jack of all trades.

Or they may mean no less than a diploma degree required. I have applied to one position that advertised as that and they meant they preferred a diploma or higher. Jmo.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Hmm - very interesting. Do you have a link?

My new DON thinks that current programs don't offer enough clinical experience. Here in NY as a recent LPN grad I have to agree. And my friends who went on to the RN program are less than thrilled with what clinicals are teaching them. Lots of hours, lots of sitting around waiting for an instructor, not a lot of hands-on.

Imafloat, BSN, RN

Has 13 years experience.

My new DON thinks that current programs don't offer enough clinical experience. Here in NY as a recent LPN grad I have to agree. And my friends who went on to the RN program are less than thrilled with what clinicals are teaching them. Lots of hours, lots of sitting around waiting for an instructor, not a lot of hands-on.

That is one program, not all prorams are like that.

That is one program, not all prorams are like that.

Yes, which is why I stated clearly that it was HERE where we live to which I was referring.

Now, I don't know how it is THERE where the ad was posted but it might be the same situation.

Jo Dirt

Has 9 years experience.

My new DON thinks that current programs don't offer enough clinical experience. Here in NY as a recent LPN grad I have to agree. And my friends who went on to the RN program are less than thrilled with what clinicals are teaching them. Lots of hours, lots of sitting around waiting for an instructor, not a lot of hands-on.

Boy, that's the truth. Lots of wasted time in nursing school. The most skilled procedure I did in LPN school was give an insulin shot.

I was talking to a nurse who got her PN diploma in the 70's and she said they did just about everything in their program and when they got out, there wasn't a lot they hadn't done and gotten proficient at.

Some people argue that school is harder now than it used to be, but I don't see how this can be true, myself.

but more "hands on" isnt segueing (sp) into the management issue.......perhaps the "---or higher" is the correct interpretation....

jenrninmi, MSN, RN

Specializes in L&D. Has 11 years experience.

That is one program, not all prorams are like that.

And I would even say that MOST programs are not like that.

Can't speak for anyone other than myself, but my LPN program had more clinical hours than the local state university RN program had. Also, the RN students had to wait for an instructor, who was less than enthusiastic, and several of their students expressed envy of the clinical experiences we LPN students had, saying we (lpn students) learned more skills, had instructors readily available, and were probably better prepared for the real world. These were second year RN students, by the way.

That's just what it was like in the area I went to school in, and probably isn't like that everywhere, but it is definately an observation that SOME schools are like that almost EVERYWHERE.

Ok , I called the places with this in the add. I actually know one of the managers. She said Diploma nurses are better prepared. She has found that over the years diploma nurses are better suited for these positions. Wow , that's a switch.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Wow - I have not seen these ads. I wonder if it is a regional idiosyncracy?

Old Diploma nurse here, back in the day, we were basically used as staff, we lived nursing at the dorm attached to the hospital, 8 hour shifts just like staff, so yeah, we did get the skills. We could jump right in, especially if one worked at the hospital they "trained" at. It was nurses training, we did have college classes in the sciences related to nursing. As far as nursing, I wouldn't trade my diploma preparation for any other type. Remember, this was a LOOOONG time ago. I thought they phased out most of the other diploma programs, I didn't realize there were any more out there, except for MERIT. I've been in management positions, we had that as part of our curriculum as well, in fact all of our rotations were for a full 3 month semester, every day, all day.....We didn't wait for instructors, they were waiting for you:lol2:

gr8rnpjt, RN

Specializes in Case Management. Has 38 years experience.

I went to a Diploma program in the late 70's. We had lots of clinicals from the first semester all the way through. Most weeks we spend 50% of our days on the units and the other 50 in class. I remember the instructors telling us (at the time) that Degree nurses (BSN's specifically) were only getting a couple of half days a week clinical in their senior year. They were coming out scared and hesitant on the units with no people skills. But that was then and I don't know anything about what happens now. Are there still diploma schools around? (really, no flaming. I am simply stating what I heard in the late 70's)

I went throught the LPN program last year and we heard alot about the fact that we were on clinicals from 730 to 3 and then RN students from most of the schools were usually only there from 730 to 11. Most of the floors and departments felt there weren't there enough time to even do anything. So when I started for the RN right after I chose the local hospital's Diploma School because they have smaller classes so more one-on-one with the instructors, not sitting waiting for them and more clinical time, not to mention they gave me the most credit toward the LPN that I already have where as at the local CC I would have had to repeat classes that I pretty much already went through. I do believe this may be the only diploma school left in NY State.

Cherish

Specializes in Junior Year of BSN.

The school I will be attending is a Diploma program. The oldest in the state over 100 years, so they have a huge reputation of turning out great RN's. I went to a Uniform store that is owned by an RN and told her what school I will be going to and she said you will get hired anywhere around here, they know the reputation of that 'great' school.

Not saying anything bad about any other programs, think every program has a benefit. But this school does have more clinical hours and I guess since its part of the hospital its not like they have to contract hours like other schools. That could be why diploma programs have more hours, I took all the pre req's that the ADN program requires to at a CC. Have started on my pre req's for the RN-BSN program so when I am done I could go right on into that online.

I love the reputation this school has very strict, military like (I'm a veteran so structure does not bother me), but produces great RN's, really great facility, has the most clinical hours, and the highest first time NCLEX pass rates. Think thats what counts when looking for any degree program.

Hi Cherish,

Are your refering to Watts in Durham? If your are...I will taking the exam tomorrow. I currently live in MD, but I'm willing to relocate if I get into the program. I hear that they produce wonderful nurses and it is my first choice. I am familiar with the area because I went to college in Raleigh. Congrats on getting into the program. Best Wishes!

KIKI0617

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