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Jo Dirt

Jo Dirt

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Jo Dirt has 9 years experience.

LPN 2000, ASN Excelsior grad. 2006, Middle Tennessee State University BSN graduate May 2009, Tennessee Technological University FNP graduate 2011...

Jo Dirt's Latest Activity

  1. Jo Dirt

    Got into MSN/ MGH....now what...

    I'm the sole wage earner in my family of 6 (4 children and a husband) and I am about to start a FNP program that's total cost will be 15-17k. The first year I can probably work at least 3 days a week. When clinicals start I may have to stop working for a year. That will add maybe another 20k to the student debt. Maybe 35K total, I figure. I think you could find a cheaper way. That's medical school type debt...I'd say a lot of MD's don't even end up owing that much. It's not sounding like a good plan.
  2. Jo Dirt

    Need advice from experienced LTC nurses.

    this is hard to sift through. let me run this through my little orphan annie secret decoder pin and i'll get back to you.
  3. Jo Dirt

    Need advice from experienced LTC nurses.

    THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! I have never understood why people whine about the loads they are expected to carry at the nursing homes. Nursing homes are NOT acute care hospitals! They focus on MAINTENANCE. What do people expect? Really? There is a routine in a nursing home. You learn your routine and go with it. Not to say a lot of nursing homes don't have staffing issues, but I've never complained because I was responsible for a big med pass and blood sugars and charting--I've even managed to help with a shower or two in between. It's a hard day's work, but I used to care for more than 40 patients and was never so overwhelmed the patients were in unsafe situations.
  4. Jo Dirt

    My God, these family members!!

    They don't put up with crap like that where I work. The DON tells them with a quickness that if we can't meet their needs Mom or Pop can be hauled out of there in a heartbeat. This doesn't mean we nurses have the easy road, we're expected to stay hopping, but not on account of some unreasonable family member.
  5. Jo Dirt

    Very upset and depressed...almost got fired

    For one thing, what kind of stone-aged place is this that doesn't have provisions in place to allow weekend admissions? For another thing, the facility needs to blame itself if it didn't go over this policy, what else have they not told you? Handing you an employee handbook and telling you to read it doesn't get them off the hook. We have a woman who handles all the employee orientation and she goes through the whole handbook with new employees to make sure there are no questions. You made an honest mistake, it wasn't a mistake because of incompetence on your part. If I could be there I'd take up for you. There are enough things to get down about without letting this one add to it. I don't think it was your fault.
  6. Jo Dirt

    To all the mothers: Day Care Advice (long)

    I didn't legally marry my childrens' father until the oldest was 9 years old and I still called him my "husband." It was nobody's business, but it saved a lot of explaining. I was an LPN/LVN, I was proud to be an LPN/LVN and I'll never let anyone take it away from me. I made a better RN because of it. As for thinking God is only on your side, this is not exactly a rational way to make decisions, when you consider the millions who think God is on their side who meet their doom anyway. Be careful, it looks like a straight up road ahead.You'll miss a lot of time with your baby in the process, but I know what it's like to be he(( bent on doing something.
  7. Jo Dirt

    To all the mothers: Day Care Advice (long)

    I'll be Frank (and I'll be Earnest, too) but I can only make assumptions, forgive me if I'm wrong. When you say "boyfriend" I am just assuming this is not the father of your infant. If you have not known this man long, please do not leave him with your child. For that matter, jails are full of innocent people (if you know what I mean.) I recently saw on the news about a woman grieving over her year old daughter she left with her boyfriend while she went to class at the local college. He shook her baby to death. She says she couldn't understand how he could do this because he treated her like gold the whole time she knew him. Bad people don't have the decency to wear a sign or show overt indicators they are not nice people. I used to be trusting of people, way too trusting. It sounds like this may not be the best time to move, especially with a young child and no family around. If you move, please contact the CPs to find daycare centers and get all the financial help you can through grants and public assistance. If you think I'm being paranoid, just think of how you would feel if something happened to that sweet baby. You can't be too careful. P.S. I know what it is like to feel like you've got an opportunity you have to hold on to, but it sounds like you may have a lot of things going against you with this. I recently turned down my dream job after a lot of grieving over it but finally decided it wasn't what was best for my four children. I've had many regrets over not taking this job (which would have required me to move out of state) but there came a point I had to realize the cards were stacked against me. Surely, you have another option. Why can't you go to the vo-tech and become an LPN first? Don't you have a local vocational school? It's only a year! You could then work and do an online LPN to BSN program...it isn't that out of reach! I'm not going to think I'm going to change your mind, but in case there is any chance of getting you to consider an alternative I want to put it out there.
  8. Jo Dirt

    Where Do People Dream This Stuff Up?

    This makes me sick.
  9. Jo Dirt

    Need advice from experienced LTC nurses.

    I would challenge you to come work where I work. Other than that, this kind of statement will only perpetuate the myth that all nursing homes are horrible. Nursing homes are a fact of life. People go there and that is usually their "last" address. They are at their worst in life, they need more than anyone can truly do for them and it's often not a pretty, romantic end. When nature fails to take its course, what else should should be done with these people? A NH is a NH, a person can make what they want of it. I have the same patients and I've grown attached to them. I actually look forward to coming in every morning and seeing them. We laugh and talk and make the best out of a sad situation. We have one stroke patient in his 40's who is such a clown they made a name tag for him in the front office that says "(_) Nursing Center, John Doe, Handyman." He gets a lot of attention with that and he loves it. There are times that are sad. His wife will come see him and he knows she has a boyfriend and he cries everytime he sees her, and we want to kick her to the curb but can't. Yes, it's sad, but he knows we love him and in a way we are his family. The patients stay clean and well-fed. They get a lot of stimulation and attention they wouldn't get anywhere else. We only have one in-house decubitus and it's very minor. We have a low turnover. I love where I work. Not all Nhs are "bad."
  10. Jo Dirt

    Where Do People Dream This Stuff Up?

    I told my mother I didn't understand how I got pregnant, all we did was swim in the same swimming pool.
  11. Jo Dirt

    Need advice from experienced LTC nurses.

    This is the nature of nursing home work, unfortunately. It works kind of like the sale barn. With the people very needy, there is ALWAYS something to do, you will always leave thinking of things you needed to do. I've seen NHs so hard up the nurses would just do what they had to do...they, WE, weren't bad nurses, we were in bad situations and put in positions of defeat before we would even hit the floor. It takes a certain kind of nurse to accept when it is "good enough." Some nurses can't deal with that, but that's okay. We had an ICU nurse quit after a few weeks because she couldn't deal with it. She was used to having two patients and things being much more organized and precise. You hit the floor in a nursing home and have a pill passing marathon, with all kinds of distractions, if you get a new admission or have to fill out an incident report that can set you back a good hour. One thing they have never told me to do though, is leave before I feel like I've done all I can do. The nursing home where I work now is like heaven. We have 1 nurse to 23 patients (used to be 1 to 42). You actually have time to care about what you're doing. You get to spend more time crossing the t's and dotting the i's.
  12. Jo Dirt

    How do you deal with drug-seekers?

    I posted to another thread that reminded me of something I saw a couple of years ago while accompanying my father-in-law to the doctor. It was at this medical clinic and there was this woman (maybe up in her 50's, she had a rough life apparently and probably looked older than she was) and she was wandering around in circles (this was a large clinic). She found the doctor she was looking for and I heard her ask him, "Can I get some Lortabs?" and he quickly told her, "No, I just can't do that, I'm sorry." Another time, I was in nursing school (LPN) and me and another student got to spend a day with a specialist in internal medicine. This one woman came in so messed up she couldn't stand straight. He was so patient with her but I wanted to give her a foot in the rear. She was laying across the exam table laughing and rolling around and her eyes were glazed...I was so disgusted with that woman. My experience with clinics is limited and such, but do you see a lot of drug seekers? Is this something you must deal with a lot? Do you have the liberty to refuse to see a patient you suspect of being a junkie looking for a fix?
  13. I doubt they are joking, that is where the hard part will come in-getting them to understand that just because I have access to a MD's prescription pad doesn't mean it's party time.
  14. Jo Dirt

    Are Accelerated programs worth the money!

    I'll just say that even with my fluff classes it will be a heck of a lot cheaper (BSN and MSN together) than cutting to the chase with an overpriced "accelerated" degree, and in the long run the time I would have saved in an accelerated program won't amount to a lot.
  15. Jo Dirt

    Are Accelerated programs worth the money!

    Some people will try to tell you there is no price tag on education but I say there is. Why would you spend 40k on something you can do a lot cheaper? 3.3 is just fine for a GPA. Mine is between 3.1 and 3.2 and I'm about to graduate from a BSN program.
  16. TRY to remember, please TRY!!! I shouldn't be so hard on the teacher, she did email us telling us we had the right to challenge the grade we received (apparently, it was MOST of the class who bombed this paper!) and she would correct the grade. I don't think I will argue. I admit I didn't spend the kind of time on it I should have (it seems the hardest part comes at the end, so hard to focus!) And I forgot to add in the pop quiz, which was just enough to still give me an A for the class. All is well in paradise.
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