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Quit after first day of orientation!

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SunshineBaby

Specializes in NICU, School Nursing, & Community Health. Has 8 years experience.

I'm not going to flame you by any means but I do want to say that in nursing you need to be careful about burning bridges, even if you choose not to stay in this field. You never know who you might need in the future. I quit my first nursing job after 5 months. Now, looking back I wish I would have stuck it out. I wish you the best of luck in whatever field you choose.

wow babe. it seems like everyone is letting you have it. in a way you deserve it, but you are brave to admit such a thing on this site. i hope you find your way, and dont take the criticism too hard. just pray long and hard about what it is you really want to do and ask yourself what it was about nursing that made you want to persue it. maybe you can take on different aspects of healthcare. good luck to you. keep your head up.

i am responding to the only kind person on here .... thank you. but while i am not a "spring chicken" as some of you like to call it, i was a paralegal for my first half of my career, police officer for the 2nd half of it ..... i figured it i can hop over a 6 foot fence chasing crackheads down, then i should be able to stand the physical demands of nursing! and i am not old by anyone's standards ... i am only 46!!! but sitting behind a desk and sitting in a patrol car are way different than standing on your feet for 8 hrs/ day.

and i did speak with my nursing manager -- who told me to reflect on the day i had and get back to her ..... she understands .....oh, and by the way .... i also had zero sleep the last two weeks wondering if my own mother would live or die! so, hey ,,,, thanks to all of you who i thought were professional for your lack of compassion! my mother spent 5 days in the icu the week prior to me starting, and i still went to work as scheduled! 5pints of blood later, she is finally on the long road to recovery!

so, again ... thanks ... it's nice to know all of the fellow nurses on here have so much compassion for someone just looking for others to help them out in their time of need! i have no family here in florida -- i'm all she has, so i had to do it all ---- by myself! i am just so irritated that i came to this board for help and support, and yet i got none!

oh, and to the "hater" who said, "good luck finding a job"..... i had one starting today! the judge i worked for hired me back -- on the spot -- no questions asked. so, as you can see, i do have high morals and standards - and excellent work ethics as well. but when you can clearly see that your body cannot handle something, the key is to get out before you sink .... not stay and let your fellow co-workers suffer ......

thanks again!

and i hate to tell you, but just as all the other overweight people on here are thinking ... YOU ARE WRONG! i am physically fit, work out 5 times a week - to be a cop you have to be fit! and i am 5'5" and a slim 118lbs .... but hey, thanks for thinking i was "fat" just shows how much you really care about your overweight coworkers ...... unreal!

Thanks Mamma.

My prereq instructor told me that the nursing dept had no sense of humor but I thought he was talking about the teachers. Some of you need to put yourselves on the organ donor list for a sense of humor transplant.

I never called anyone fat, certainly not the OP, nor did I attack anyone personally. What I did do was note my personal observations.

To the Op, I do think you made a mistake. If you do ANYTHING for the first time, it's going to hurt. If it didn't, it wasn't worth doing.

And, yes I am new to Allnurses and I have posted elsewhere that I am still a nursing student, so what?

Some of you people need to work on your reading comprehension.

Show me where I called ANYONE here fat!

I wasn't even THINKING you are fat - that's what "OFF TOPIC" means - that it's not related to THIS topic.

One last time, SHOW ME WHERE I CALLED YOU FAT!

and i hate to tell you, but just as all the other overweight people on here are thinking ... YOU ARE WRONG! i am physically fit, work out 5 times a week - to be a cop you have to be fit! and i am 5'5" and a slim 118lbs .... but hey, thanks for thinking i was "fat" just shows how much you really care about your overweight coworkers ...... unreal!

This is a little off topic, but still related in a way.

As a beginning nursing student, I've noticed quite a few people anywhere from overweight just downright FAT at our school. A vast majority of these people actually ride the elevator up ONE level - we only have 2 floors.

My thoughts are that if you can't even walk up ONE flight of stairs, how are you going to be on your feet all day as an RN? (Some of these people are in school for respiratory tech, radiology, etc.)

My reading comprehension skills are just fine. Maybe you need a communications class. Correct me if I am wrong but you words were: "...I've noticed quite a few people anywhere from overweight to just downright FAT at our school..." followed by "majority of these people ACTUALLY ride the elevator up one level..." then followed by "how are you going to be on your feet all day as an RN?"

Your words not mine. From what I read you categorized overweight people + riding an elevator = difficulty working on your feet as an RN. If you are still having problems comprehending why you are receiving posts about your attitude maybe you should consider a people skills class also...

And on a lighter note - I can understand why you are so uptight & rude... That stick has been wedged up you

a $ $ for a while hasnt it? Sorry - maybe its my blood sugar talking again.

To the OP - sorry for deviating from the topic. I wish you the best. Every situation is different and I truly hope you find you niche. It might not have worked out well with this job, but that does not mean the end of your career. Nor does it mean that all nursing jobs will be just like the one you tried. Keep your head up and keep going.

GadgetRN71, ASN, RN

Specializes in Operating Room. Has 15 years experience.

Some of you people need to work on your reading comprehension.

Show me where I called ANYONE here fat!

I wasn't even THINKING you are fat - that's what "OFF TOPIC" means - that it's not related to THIS topic.

One last time, SHOW ME WHERE I CALLED YOU FAT!

True..you didn't call anyone fat outright..but you did mention the "fat" people you see at school everyday(and put it in bold letters too, might I add). It was implied that you think that those that are overweight are less able to handle the physical demands of nursing.

There was a certain tone in your first post and the ones following it. For someone who supposedly has a great sense of humor, you come off as defensive and hostile. Writing every few words in bold letters isn't helping this perception any.;)

DolceVita, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

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And on a lighter note - I can understand why you are so uptight & rude... That stick has been wedged up you

a $ $ for a while hasnt it? Sorry - maybe its my blood sugar talking again.

:hhmth:

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience.

Back on topic.

Often there are posts here asking if there are people too old to start nursing. Even people under 40 have asked.

In the kindest way, maybe the OP is too old and lacking physical health to become a nurse.

There are other healthcare field careers she can look into now.

wonderbee, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care; community health; psych.

OMG, how discouraging it is to read these posts. We are talking about someone who made a decision not to go into nursing. That's the sum of it. I give her credit for putting the wheels in motion to at least look into it. Yes, she is an older woman. So was I when I got my nursing license at age 50. Aches and pains, you bet! I've got nearly 5 years in.

I have a question. This judgmental attitude that is so much a part of our profession... is it a learned response because we get beaten down on a daily basis by the demands of our work, or are we born with it?

canoehead, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 30 years experience.

I'm fat Chuck! I'm old and I'm fat. Call me fat Chuck- I just DARE you. I ride the elevator DOWN one floor I'm so lazy.

Come on Chuck, let's have a throw down!

(Chuck being a skinny little weiner, trying to take on a big thick cranky ER nurse...taking wagers now.)

:spin

And on a lighter note - I can understand why you are so uptight & rude... That stick has been wedged up you

a $ $ for a while hasnt it? Sorry - maybe its my blood sugar talking again.

Now that was funny :)

My sense of humor is just fine ChuckE, but thanks for your concern.

I just don't think that cranky, judgmental posts that make sweeping generalizations are funny.

i am so sorry i even started this post. i did so, because this site was one of the reasons i decided to try nursing as my 2nd career! i had so much help and support from fellow nurses, but this post is now out of control!

yes, i tried and decided it was not for me. did i fail? no, i did not. i proved to myself and my son - who by the way is only 8 - oh, but i'm old -- i proved to both of us that no matter what, it is never too late to pursue your dreams! i thought i wanted to be a nurse since i was 16 years old. my sister, six years my senior, became an rn by starting as a unit secretary at our local hospital and working her way up. 30 years later, she has retired from the hospital, but enjoyed nursing so much, she is now an elementary school nurse, as well as spends her entire summer as a camp nurse. so, as you can see, she was always my inspiration.

my junior year in high school, my paper was written on "what i want to be when i grow up" as that of a nurse. i did not come from a wealthy family, but my family made too much money for me to qualify for school loans/grants. i was an illinois state scholar and had a full 4-year scholarship to the university of illinois, with hopes of obtaining my bsn. but the scholarship did not cover the expense of books, fees, costs, and dorms. my parents struggled to help me afford to go there, but being that i'd have to move over 500 miles from home - sadly, i could not afford to take the scholarship.

so, at the age of 21, i moved to florida with my parents when they retired here. i've lived on my own ever since. i've only had me to take care of me and had to work to survive. i was unable to attend nursing school at that time for several reasons, but mainly because i had to work and could not afford to go to school full-time -- which was all that was offered to us "old folks."

so, say what you will .... there were some on this post who were very supportive and to you, i thank you. i know not all nurses are as cold as some of those posting on this, but i still believe and have more respect than ever for nurses. it's like the saying, "walk a mile in my shoes ..... " anyway, thanks for the kind words and to those who only have mean, hateful things to say, "god has a way of dealing with you!"

the nurses i have met on here are some of the nicest, kindest, people on the earth -- and yes, some are actually real friends who i speak with on the phone, via email, etc.

and to those who think i burned bridges: my nursing manager called me today and wants me to come back to work at the hospital! so, again, i must re-evaluate my life, but as you can see - i did not burn any bridges. my personality, work ethics and the caring/compassion i have shown to not only my patients, but my co-workers, speaks volumes!

so put that in your pipe and smoke it! and may god bless you!

Op you speak from years of experience. You approach things cautiously as wise people with experience in life and work do. I think we all can point out posters who lack the intuition of tenure in life. Sometimes I think that there should be a minimum age requirement for nursing. A carnival ride, this is not. There definitely needs to be some evidence of developmental achievement. We do not base decisions in this field on the same things a teenager would deem important.

I just opened a huge can of whoop-a.. worms. :yawn: Now to get pumkin and apple to make a few pies for tomorrow...

Apologies if this is a double post. My response seems to have vanished.

OP: If you decide to take your nurse manager up on the offer of a second try, I wanted to share that my first shift of CNA clinicals (so not even the job--just the student portion) left me so exhausted that I crawled into bed when I got home at 3 in the afternoon and slept for the next 12 hours. I was stunned and wondered if I had made a huge mistake.

The second day was better. By the third day, I was sailing through the shift, no problems.

What helped on day two and day three: staying hydrated (this was the biggest change from day one). Eating a little meat, cheese and fresh fruit at lunch, but no bread. This is probably just me, but bread at lunch makes me sleepy!

I wore good shoes all 3 days and that really helped. I'm hoping to start my first CNA job in a couple of weeks, as my next step toward nursing school.

Good luck with whatever you decide!

Dina

I didn't officially quit, but I am seriously considering it~~~

I read your story, and don't let the negative responses get to you. There is NO way to fully appreciate and understand how physically and mentally demanding nursing is.

I commend you for going after your dream, but realizing that it isn't

a good fit for you.

Nurses need to not be catty toward one another so much!

I don't like it when preceptors or seasoned nurses belittle new grads for asking questions or needing help. They forget that they were new at one time!

And, in today's world of nursing school, it's quite possible to graduate without officially inserting a cath or Iv in a real patient. It happened to several of my schoolmates!

So when we new grads show up on a floor and have to admit that we may not have done something before, the nurses look at us like we're stupid or they say 'what, you didn't learn that in school??"...... it's frustrating....

anyway, i went a little off topic, but just know that you're not alone!;)

The day I started my orientation at an LTAC (only job I could find as a nurse....), another YOUNGER nurse started the same day. She lasted 4 days. Later, they hired a 20-something to fill that slot. She lasted 2 days.

I have been at this facility for 2 months now. My feet hurt BAD in the morning. (I work 3 - 11 and sleep from ~1am - 8 am.) I find it hard to even walk. Soaking in a tub helps somewhat. While working, I don't feel pain at all....it is only afterwards. As an FYI, I am 49 yo, 5'4" and weigh 122 lbs and like the OP, worked in a cubicle farm for 25 yrs.

What is frustrating is:

Orientation is a time for both employer and employee to figure out if this is a good fit.

Yet we are told:

DON'T leave that position too early!

Don't put that position on your resume...it will hurt you!

"Don't worry, you will find your niche in nursing someday."

Congrats on standing up to and abusive employment situation! (d/t illegal actions of mgmt)

Good luck finding another job!

etc....

While the OP may not be suited for this field, better the OP find out sooner than later (after investing all that money for NS!)

It is the closed mindedness of some nurses that enter management that frustrates the hades out of folks. The purpose of an interview is to find out more about the candidates. In my personal case, I am leaving because of management coersion to work off the clock or be "charged with theft of time" (with none of it in writing, of course)....not to mention - I learned that another nurse (with a history of going past clock out time) was told to LEAVE at 3:15 period, not allowed to stay off the clock to do her charting....the supervisor said SHE would do nurses documentation for her (ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!?!?!) :eek:

I am blessed in that I have another very valid "reason for leaving" than the abuse of the management. My hubby is military and lives in another state during the week. We just got custody of his 15 yo son. It is imperitive that both of us be available for this boy d/t hubby's work which often takes him out of town or out of state for weeks at a time.

The biggest obstacle for those of us that leave during orientation shouldn't be getting an interview (pre-judged by NMs), but in answering the question,"How can you re-assure me that you will stay with this position?"

joanna73, BSN, RN

Specializes in geriatrics.

I certainly empathize with the OP. As a new grad, I've felt like quitting at least 25 times in the past 9 and a half months, for various reasons. However, my goal is to stay at least 2 years. We all feel like giving up at times, but the consequences often outweigh the instant gratification of saying, "I'm outta here!"

@joanna, the flip side of that is by putting up with abuse, the abuse continues....and eventually, the culture (stockholm syndrome) is created....and then those who won't put up with abuse then get treated as if they are less than nurse-like.

Abuse only continues when those with courage stand up to it. And believe me, CNAs ARE abused....they are treated like crap by less than understanding patients and family members, are disregarded by many a nurse, and management sees them as expendable. I have the utmost respect for the CNAs in our facility....God bless them for the work they do! :)