RN Vs. BSN program, which one is less competitive?

  1. knock...knock?....yep YOU may come in, every is welcome here!

    Okay guys, I have my AA degree with all the prerequite classes done, but i am not sure which program is best for me or which one is a bit easier to get in? Or are they equally hard to get it? :uhoh21:

    Is it less competitive to get in RN-BSN? Would it be a smart idea to get RN license first and then apply to BSN ? If i go this route, then I will have to retake some clasess that aren't not w/n the past 5 years? Do you guys happen to know what are those classes that have to be w/n past 5 years? oh boy......this is complicated stuff! lol

    What do you guys think?

    Any ideas/inputs/comments/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
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    About thida, BSN, RN

    Joined: Jul '05; Posts: 30; Likes: 10
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    13 Comments

  3. by   SummerGarden
    You need to talk to a counselor for most of your questions regrading transfer credits etc. Class requirements for programs vary.

    I am talking to a counselor of the RN-BSN bridge program I am interested in and I found out that all of my classes will transfer from prior degrees with the exception of one. The counselor is petitioning the one course so I will not have to repeat it when I am accepted. By the way, I have not been accepted into a ADN program yet, but to my surprise I was told this summer by a different counselor that I needed to be proactive in this matter to ensure that I move into the nursing program smoothly and I can start clinical right away after I am accpeted.

    Of course, not all schools are the same. Some may not want to talk to you until you have finished their pre-reqs or become a Registered Nurse.

    As for competitiveness. Schools vary in that respect too. So you need to contact different counselors of different programs of interest and find out what the competition is like.

    Unfortunately my post is vague because the bottom like is, programs are not consistent across the board. If you have specific schools in mind, you may be able to post questions regrading those schools and some posters on here may be able to respond. Good luck.
  4. by   JaxiaKiley
    RN-BSN programs are not very competitive because there are so many of them and they can be done online.
  5. by   thida
    MBA, if you don't mind can you tell me a little bit more about RN-BNS bridge? like how does it work?
  6. by   thida
    Jaxiakiley, that's a very interesting info. I didn't know about that before! Thanks to you by the way!!!

    MBA2BRN, do you know this too (that RN-BSN program is less competitive)?
  7. by   nursinguy
    BSN is in my area, though it has less apps you need 3.85 or higher and a good score (85 or higher) on the TEAS test to be able to get in. BSN has 350 apps verse the 800 to 1000 apps the community colleges have.
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    In California there are over 100 ASN programs and only about 26 BSN programs. I know it is different every where but, from my experience BSN programs are more competitive because they look at grades, experience, you need more pre-requs etc to apply and get accepted. The ASN programs have less pre-requests and put your name in the hat with barely passed pre-req students. It depends on how you look at it. If you have good grades it may be easier to get into a BSN, and if your grades or so-so it may be easier to get into a ASN program (although more than likely you will have to wait)

    If you do not already have your RN, than it will take a lot longer to get your RN and then bridge to BSN vs going straight BSN

    I would encourage anyone to go the BSN route, not to say one is better than the other but you have more mobility as a BSN, job wise and continuing education wise.
  9. by   nursinguy
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide

    If you do not already have your RN, than it will take a lot longer to get your RN and then bridge to BSN vs going straight BSN
    True but you will earn money as you get your BSN, if you go for your ADN first verse making nothing the eatra year the BSN straight route takes.
  10. by   SummerGarden
    I have been told that competitiveness depends on the school. If your community college has an agreement with a RN-BSN bridge then it is easier (less competitive) to get into the program then if you are attending a school without such an agreement.

    I know a few students waiting to apply to a RN-BSN program right not now because they attend schools without an agreement and are not registered nurses. Whereas I will be able to apply during my third block (before I am a Registered Nurse) and I will learn of acceptance during my fourth block (again, before I am a Registered Nurse). My acceptance will be contingent on becoming a Registered Nurse.

    I can only guess why my school is this way. I cannot say all schools are this way. I also do not know if this applies to RNs who have been out of my school forever.

    I do not know if they graduate from my school 10-20 years ago if they have it easier or harder since I am not in that environment. So I cannot safely say that the RN-BSN bridge is easier or harder to gain acceptance. That is why I think it is wise to contact the schools.

    By the way, I will say this, going the ADN route then RN-BSN route is a lot easier on the pocket book!!!! ADN courses (12 units for one semester) can cost the equivalent of ONE BSN course. Plus, many employers pay some or all of an employee's ADN and/or BSN tuition and fees. I personally am working on obtaining a few scholarships but if I do not get one, I can easily pay for the RN-BSN bridge on my income as a Registered Nurse in the event I do not receive an employer's reimbursement.

    I also know of people who are in BSN programs that agree. They wish they had tried to ADN then BSN route because they would not be in as much debt when they finish school. Some are hoping for reimbursement, but many reimbursement programs do not cover most of the debt racked up attending an accelerated or regular BSN program.

    I know one hospital that will only pay for $9000 over a three year period with a $1000-2000 sign on bonus. Despite the fact that most students taking out student loans for BSNs will incur about $20,000-40,000 worth of debt. :uhoh21: So, be sure to contact hospitals and other health care employers in your area to factor in costs.
  11. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    In California there are over 100 ASN programs and only about 26 BSN programs. I know it is different every where but, from my experience BSN programs are more competitive because they look at grades, experience, you need more pre-requs etc to apply and get accepted. The ASN programs have less pre-requests and put your name in the hat with barely passed pre-req students. It depends on how you look at it. If you have good grades it may be easier to get into a BSN, and if your grades or so-so it may be easier to get into a ASN program (although more than likely you will have to wait)
    This is why I am not in California. I am not a lucky person so my name would never come up in a Community College Lotto! I am a hard working person (straight As) and am working toward acceptance into both nursing programs (ADN and RN-BSN) by putting my nose to the grind.
  12. by   Kathyz
    Where I live I feel there's less competitive transferring to a four year college and getting your BSN. There are so many applicants flooding the Accelerated BSN programs (individuals who already have a Bachelor's Degree in another field) and well as Community College RN programs.

    If you don't already have a BA and money isn't an issue, I would try to transfer to a four year college. And then you're completely done too!
  13. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from nursinguy
    BSN is in my area, though it has less apps you need 3.85 or higher and a good score (85 or higher) on the TEAS test to be able to get in. BSN has 350 apps verse the 800 to 1000 apps the community colleges have.
    To me competitiveness equates to the number of applications vs the number of available spots. Not the minimum requirements. If a school has hundreds more applications then spots, then obviously that school is more competitive. There can be 200 high scoring straight A applicants for 80 spots. I have seen other posters give this as an example for his/her Community College. And thus, though the minimum requirement is not as high as the BSN program you mention, the applicants need a 4.0 and near perfect if not perfect test scores to be considered. Not to mention all their co-requisite course work finished, which normally is not a minimum requirement for either an ADN or a BSN applicant.

    I know it was not a minimum requirement for me to get into my ADN program or the RN-BSN bridge. However in order to be competitive I have to have all of my non-nursing course work done before applying in order to receive the highest admission scores. So I finished my non-nursing course work for my ADN this summer and am knocking out one of two RN-BSN non-nursing courses this semester.
    Last edit by SummerGarden on Sep 2, '06
  14. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from JaxiaKiley
    RN-BSN programs are not very competitive because there are so many of them and they can be done online.
    This is not true for all RN-BSN programs. Although many are conducted online, there are still a limit on the number of spots. Online instructors (I am one) are given a limit number of students. So, if the RN-BSN bridge had enough instructors then they can accommodate a number of students. By the way, the fact that there are many of them still does not mean they are not competitive. There are many CC nursing school programs too. There are not enough instructors to accommodate everyone who wishes to get into a program.

    So, I suggest to the OP that he/she contact schools to check on competitiveness. Please do not go on rumor or vague comments from other students. :wink2:

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