People really need to stop coming into nursing

Posted
by DUDERNGUY DUDERNGUY, BSN, MSN Member

Has 13 years experience.

None of you will like what I have to say. But let me kick the hard truth to you. Honestly about 50% of people I talk to are in nursing school or are taking pre-reqs for nursing school. This is a major red flag for several reasons. If you have not noticed, nursing wages/benefits have been on the down trend.

Pension?? goodbye.

Crud 401k 403b plans hello. Raise? LOL "sorry hospital is working out financial issues, maybe next year".

Nevermind if you work for a community/SNF agency. Yet insurance companies, medicare derived/gov agencies, and anyone else from the top 1% will continue to blast the RN as "shortage" in order to drive drones of students into nursing schools pulling each others hair out on the way to land a seat. Proof of this is, let's see (ABSN ***** ADN, BSN, diploma, LPN/LVN bridge to RN programs, RN to BSN) Why do these different routes exist? To flood the RN market as fast as possible to drive the wage, need, and profession into the ground.

Let's look at our oh so loyal CNA's. If you can find one that isn't in nursing school to be a nurse, ask them how much they make?

Look at LPN's 20-30 years ago and look at them today??

Surely the ANA and other organizations treated them with respect. The RN is next, so make sure to support your local nursing agency so they can do nothing for you. So they can be paid off by organizations so powerful that no one can say no and "not have the power to stop a bill". So they can continue to cry nursing shortage when this is not true.

RNs today are treated like children and are required to demonstrate fundamental task and other skills in inservices which were designed for nothing else but cut throat. To place blame of UTI's and poor patient satisfaction on the nurse.

If you are an RN today, your only safety net is to become an APRN if you want to live comfortably but in several decades the APRN will be under attack just like the LPN had been an RNs currently are. "OH the aging population is going to need nurses" You really think so?

Nursing homes are shutting down and now elderly people live at home with "24 hour care takers" that get paid **** wages and do things only an RN should be doing. You don't think so? Wake up.

None of this is to say that I hate nursing. I love helping people who are mentally ill, suffering from dementia, sick, or on their death beds. It is when we do great things for them that my love for nursing shines. There aren't other people standing around to reward you for your great deeds.

When the family comes in the next day complaining about everything, they never had a chance to see how well their dying loved one was cared for. Your good deeds will never be rewarded, but in a safe place in your heart.

I am just here to open the eyes of people who are intelligent and looking for a new career. I think you may find better job security else where. Invest your time in classes and money else where. Nursing is honestly under great attack right now and the future is black.

Work Cited

The Future of the Nursing Workforce: National- and State-Level Projections, 2012-2025

Edited by Joe V
changed punctuation and removed fragments

whichone'spink

whichone'spink, BSN, RN

Has 3 years experience. 1,473 Posts

Thank you. I wish someone had told me this back in 2008. But what is available these days? Other than service industry jobs that are minimum wage, there are no other jobs out there

xoemmylouox, ASN, RN

Has 13 years experience. 3,150 Posts

Thank you. I wish someone had told me this back in 2008. But what is available these days? Other than service industry jobs that are minimum wage' date=' there are no other jobs out there[/quote']

Exactly. Unless your a CEO or Banker you're screwed. It is not just Nursing that isfacing these issues. Look at teachers. They make jack, they have tobuy supplies for their classes, their raises are based on studentperformance (regardless of the student's capabilities), ever risingstudent to teacher ratios, lower pay, worse benefits etc. Soundfamiliar???

Libby1987

Libby1987

3,726 Posts

I don't disagree that the production of nurses should slow waaay down, but I do not share the same experience with non appreciative families, since 1987 they're still appreciative.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 16 years experience. 226 Articles; 27,608 Posts

Here are my thoughts on this hotly contested issue.

1. The lowest-quality nursing programs need to be closed.

2. Nursing needs to do a better job of controlling the numbers of new entrants into this profession. Other health professions such as medicine, physical therapy and speech language pathology maintain tight control over the number of people who enter those occupations.

3. Nursing needs to implement slightly higher barriers to entry. Moreover, entry requirements should be standardized and consistent across the country.

4. Nursing needs to adopt limits on the number of times that candidates are allowed to repeatedly take NCLEX. You cannot pass after 10 attempts? Step aside, please. Aspiring attorneys are not permitted to keep retaking the bar exam as many times as they want, and I think nursing needs to follow that model.

5. Nursing is one of the few professions that produces large numbers of graduates who feel entitled to employment in their hometowns. Meanwhile, graduates who enter other professions keenly expect to relocate to land their first jobs.

Overall, I predict the glut will continue to worsen. The powers that be expect all 'older' nurses to drop out of the workforce in the next decade, but real life simply does not unfold in that manner.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience. 8,427 Posts

Here are my thoughts on this hotly contested issue.

1. The lowest-quality nursing programs need to be closed.

2. Nursing needs to do a better job of controlling the numbers of new entrants into this profession. Other health professions such as medicine, physical therapy and speech language pathology maintain tight control over the number of people who enter those occupations.

3. Nursing needs to implement slightly higher barriers to entry. Moreover, entry requirements should be standardized and consistent across the country.

4. Nursing needs to adopt limits on the number of times that candidates are allowed to repeatedly take NCLEX. You cannot pass after 10 attempts? Step aside, please. Aspiring attorneys are not permitted to keep retaking the bar exam as many times as they want, and I think nursing needs to follow that model.

5. Nursing is one of the few professions that produces large numbers of graduates who feel entitled to employment in their hometowns. Meanwhile, graduates who enter other professions keenly expect to relocate to land their first jobs.

Overall, I predict the glut will continue to worsen. The powers that be expect all 'older' nurses to drop out of the workforce in the next decade, but real life simply does not unfold in that manner.

THIS.

Well said. :yes:

Libby1987

Libby1987

3,726 Posts

I won't be dropping out, well I'm not even close, and I will stay fit and relevant. I think the fit part is important to reducing ageism, appearance hasn't mattered in nursing as it has in other industries but it might increase with a push to lower salaries. Health reasons aside.

llg

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 45 years experience. 13,469 Posts

I strongly agree with TheCommuter and would like to add:

1. People entering nursing need to get a better grasp of the profession before the enter school (or during school). The reason we have so many people leaving the profession in the first 2 years is not just because the jobs are bad -- though some jobs are bad -- but also because some new grads have such unrealistic expectations.

2. One of those unrealistic expectations that needs to be squashed from the beginning is that we ALL need to understand that getting RN behind your name is not sufficient for the best jobs in nursing for the rest of your life. To get the most attractive jobs and be successful in the profession long-term, we all need to be life-long learners. We need to up-date and up-grade our knowledge and skills continuously. We need to invest in ourselves to keep ourselves "attractive" for the job market. That's our job -- it's nice if the employer helps, but we need to take some responsibility for ourselves. That is what professionals do.

3. The best jobs usually go to the most qualified applicants that meet the needs of the employer. A surprising number of nurses don't seem to realize that.

4. If we want to be treated like professionals, we need to act like professionals. I hear/see so much unprofessional behavior among nurses, that I often think many of us don't deserve to be called professionals. (And I see it here on allnurses every day.)

RNperdiem

RNperdiem, RN

Has 14 years experience. 4,520 Posts

Trouble is people will keep coming into nursing. Maintaining a middle-class life is getting harder and there is more interest in nursing now that entire job categories have vanished. You can quote many facts, but a potential nurse will still see a pretty decent starting wage for the cost of a community college education.

RNsRWe, ASN, RN

4 Articles; 10,428 Posts

To some degree, the crappiest pop-up nursing schools tend to not impact the profession too greatly, IMHO, simply by virtue of the fact that so many of their graduates cannot pass the NCLEX to save their lives. And the ones that do manage to snag a license aren't likely to stay in the profession long, based on the reading I do on this very website ("help, i think i'm gonna loose my license, i gave the wrong meds to the wrong people at the wrong times.....and it's really not a big deal that i didn't call the doctor when his patient totally crashed......and i just forgot to change the dressings and chart what i was supposed to.......and the other nurses are just old and jealous and mean so they make me call out all the time and why not i deserve to....but i'm a great nurse!!!!"). Or how about this one: "I'm a brand new grad but that doesn't mean I should have to work nights, and weekends, and holidays, and not get my preferred vacation time off every year, does it?? I've sent my resume to every employer within a one hour drive, why can't I find a job???"

I wish a survey existed that could show the percentage of new grads from these crappy schools who can't hold onto a job once they get one!

danielle2000

danielle2000, MSN, RN

Specializes in Family Practice. Has 1 years experience. 174 Posts

You have to consider the generation who are entering in this profession. The-it-is-all-about me generation!!! Not realizing you have to pay your dues like everyone else. I can understand the frustration among experienced nurses who have been in the trenches and are still standing proud. I think it will only get worse before improvement will occur. Nursing has its moments, but for the most part it is a dynamic area in which you can choose where you want to go, the resources to build upon your knowledge is plentiful. My sister who is 46 years old graduated from nursing school a couple of years ago realized the short coming on her unit and is already enrolled in a BSN to get off the floor. She did not whine or complain she simply decided more education and seek other options.

MatrixRn

MatrixRn

Specializes in Management, Med/Surg, Clinical Trainer. Has 20 years experience. 448 Posts

Here are my thoughts on this hotly contested issue.

1. The lowest-quality nursing programs need to be closed.

2. Nursing needs to do a better job of controlling the numbers of new entrants into this profession. Other health professions such as medicine, physical therapy and speech language pathology maintain tight control over the number of people who enter those occupations.

3. Nursing needs to implement slightly higher barriers to entry. Moreover, entry requirements should be standardized and consistent across the country.

4. Nursing needs to adopt limits on the number of times that candidates are allowed to repeatedly take NCLEX. You cannot pass after 10 attempts? Step aside, please. Aspiring attorneys are not permitted to keep retaking the bar exam as many times as they want, and I think nursing needs to follow that model.

5. Nursing is one of the few professions that produces large numbers of graduates who feel entitled to employment in their hometowns. Meanwhile, graduates who enter other professions keenly expect to relocate to land their first jobs.

Overall, I predict the glut will continue to worsen. The powers that be expect all 'older' nurses to drop out of the workforce in the next decade, but real life simply does not unfold in that manner.

I agree with all of the above. In relation to point 2, those groups control the quality of entrance by having a national standard, followed by national licensure. We do have a national test, the NCLEX, but then we are licensed by our individual states. Why? So each state can make money off of licensing the RN. Compact status needs to mean more than just being licensed in multiple states by virtue of where one lives, it should also mean a national clinical and professional standard.

In this way points 1, 3 and 4 can come to fruition.

I also agree the glut of nurses will continue to worsen. There is a large monetary incentive for the schools [tuition money] and healthcare facilities [ability to hire the cheapest staff] to keep this system running.