New Grad Starting Career, Advice PLEASE!

  1. I graduated in March. I have passed NCLEX and have a license number. I have applied for over 80 jobs and have had 3 interviews, 1 part time and 2 full time. I was offered the part time job but knew I really wanted to wait for a full time position because working part time I'll be making just as much as I was making before I took all of these loans and became a nurse. I didn't get into nursing for money however I have so much debt now, why is it becoming a problem to secure a full time position as a new grad? The one full time position called me back with good and bad news, they wanted me but could only give me part time because an internal candidate got the full time position I interviewed for. The second full time I haven't heard back from but it doesn't start until July. Is this the norm, extreme difficulty getting any position but mostly a full time position? I have already let go of wanting specific areas and shifts but even after compromising its like I'm still being held back. I don't feel I deserve to make less than my classmates who are getting hired full time, Im not sure of the problem.
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    About brightfutureRN

    Joined: May '16; Posts: 27; Likes: 9
    from PA , US

    10 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Part time is better than no time. Get some experience and you'll be more marketable. As a new graduate, you don't have much to offer. If you're not willing to accept their terms, they'll find another one just like you in five minutes.
  4. by   ivyleaf
    Het into the system. When someone else leaves you can bet more hours
  5. by   brightfutureRN
    Im hoping summer a lot of vaca more hours but hope and wishing and depending on others doesn't pay thousands in student loans, thats my only thing. So I started applying for other type of jobs I can do from home and not clinical based in the time being like teleRX do you know anything about that?
  6. by   kbrn2002
    If you don't get a full time position right away take the part time. Part time is better than no time and once you are in the system you will have that foot in the door and will be that internal candidate that gets the full time position before they hire somebody else. Depending on where you would be working you may be able to pick up enough shifts to essentially convert that part time to full time anyway, you just wouldn't get the full time benefits associated with an actual full time position.
  7. by   brightfutureRN
    The benefits are actually the full benefits that's the part I really don't understand with both part time offerings it's like why are you even denying me just 1 extra day per week. Maybe the savings plan or any education benefit might be a little different, idk but with both part time offerings they said I do get the benefits. I was figuring it will be opportunity for extra work at most of these hospitals which is why I'm taking it anyway. Thank you for the positive feedback without any judgmental attitude.
  8. by   nalie2
    It probably depends on the area you live in. In the Los Angeles area I have not had any difficulty finding full time work. If I were you, I would take the part time job and keep looking for a full time job or maybe your part time will convert to a full time position.
  9. by   Hoosier_RN
    Tele nursing at home usually requires experience, in fact any company would hire a new grad would be considered shady, because you need excellent assessment skills. Part time is better than 0 time. Your student loan providers don't care if you're about your employment status, they want their money. I'm not trying to be a negative Nancy, but more a realistic Rita.
  10. by   Medic_Murse
    Like everyone else has said, take what you can get. You might not think it's fair, but at least you were offered two part time jobs where a lot of other graduates are struggling to even get an interview (I know, I was one of those people). Don't compare yourself to your classmates, it doesn't do or prove anything to either you or them. Take the part time gig, prove yourself, and if a full time position opens up you may be first in line for the job. Where I use to work, we would all switch between full time/part time and back depending on what was going on in our lives.
  11. by   WanderRN
    Student loan payments don't start for six months, take the part-time and then keep looking for full.
  12. by   mindiianajones
    I'm a new grad, too, and I applied to a lot of places and got the standardized, canned rejection email from a lot of them. I have a full-time job because I was offered one at the hospital that I currently work at as a per diem CNA. So I'm lucky. I'm sure I could have found a job, eventually, at a nursing home or if I extended out my search radius, but I'm definitely glad for the opportunity I've been given.

    That being said, I'd definitely take the part time job. A job is a job, and a part-time job is better than no job, at all. When I was a CNA, I had gone for a full-time position at my hospital and was given per diem because a former employee had come back and they gave the position I applied for and interviewed for to her instead. Thank God I was because it worked better for my schedule, but it also meant I could pick up hours whenever I wanted. Take the part-time. Hopefully, they'll give you a full-time orientation. And when you can, pick up extra shifts, see if you can meet full-time hours just by picking up. And then when there's an opening for a full-time position, go for that. Part-time, at least, gets you a foot in the door like other people have said. Sometimes getting jobs is all about the networking and already having an in.

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