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Nurses in their 60's or 70's

Posted

Has 19 years experience.

Not that you ask your co-workers their ages but......

Do you work with many nurses in this age group? If so, where do they work??????

Anisettes, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED, OR, SAF, Corrections. Has 26 years experience.

There are 2 RN's where I work in their 60's - we're in the OR of a military hospital (they're both civilians though, not military). Why?

Have seen nurses in this age group at both LTC and private duty home care. I would never ever recommend LTC to anyone no matter what the age. I do recommend private duty home care. Of course, if you need a good paying job you won't get it doing private duty home care.:crying2:

Elvish, BSN, DNP, RN, NP

Specializes in Community, OB, Nursery.

I work with several nurses in their 60's. We are a mother-baby/antepartum/GYN floor. One of my favorite 'mentor nurses' was a midwife in Africa for many many years and has probably delivered more babies than most of our OBs. :up:

Well, aren't you all curious? Most of us will need to work to these ages. Otessa is wise feeling it out.

opensesame

Specializes in acute/critical care. Has 11 years experience.

I work with a few in their 60's but they are all retiring very soon. I haven't ever worked with anyone in their 70's. I work in a SICU/CVICU. Some of my coworkers in their 60's have been there for over 30 years. I don't know how they could work in that setting for so long -- that won't be me, for sure!

JB2007, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, Med-SURG,STICU. Has 5 years experience.

I work with 2 nurses in their 60's and 1 nurse in her 70's in LTC. They seem to handle the work well. Some of the residents they have known for years outside of the nursing home. I know that the nurse in her 70's went to school with some of the residents. I think it is kind of nice for both the resident and the nurse.

madwife2002, BSN, RN

Specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN. Has 26 years experience.

My friend is in her 60's and works in the PACU (day surgery center)

opensesame

Specializes in acute/critical care. Has 11 years experience.

My friend is in her 60's and works in the PACU (day surgery center)

This is a great setting for those nearing retirement. I had outpatient surgery a couple of years ago and I was chatting with some of the pre-op nurses (they knew I was an RN) and one of them made the comment that same day surgery was "where old ICU nurses go to die." LOL :lol2:

many in their 60's, medsurg

My husband's sis has worked in LTC for 30 years. Her 70th birthday in next week. She is a NA in LTC. They only concession she made about 5 years ago when she went full time night shift because there is less lifting. She is still going strong. I wimped out at 59 and stopped working.

Lovely_RN, MSN

Has 11 years experience.

I work in methadone maintenance and being under 40 I'm practically the baby of the clinics! The majority of the nurses are in their 40s and 50s but we have quite a few in their 60s. I'm actually lucky to have gotten my job because th preference is for nurses with years of chemical dependency and or psych experience. The only thing that stinks is that most of the nurses came from the hospital psych and detox units and have tons and tons of seniority over me. I don't bother to worry about what days I have off or when i'm going to get vacation because I'm always last!

We also have nurses with physical ailments that makes it impossible for them to work the bedside. As long as your hands work and you have a mouth to talk and your faculties you can work as long as you please. We had someone in their 70s retire earlier this year after over 40 years of service. She could have kept on indefinitely but I guess she just wanted to retire.

Edited by Lovely_RN

We have an 84 yo in our low level ER. I almost fell over when I learned she was really that old. She moves great and is still chugging away!

ok2bme

Specializes in Psych, EMS.

My preceptor was 64 and we have a FT night nurse in her 70s. There are a few nurses in their 70s around my hospital, and most appear to work nights. I suppose it is a slower pace and less physically demanding than days. I work sub-acute psych. I think it is a great environment for nurses near retirement. There is less lifting here, and the wisdom of older nurses would be invaluable in the environment.

sunnycalifRN

Has 6 years experience.

We have three who are over 65 and can retire, but have not. I work in ICU.

notjustanurse

Specializes in ICU, Telemetry, PACU, Med-Surg. Has 9 years experience.

I work in a small, but busy, med-surg floor and we have several in that age group. The 2 aides on my shift are 67 and 78, and they work circles around all of us. I work with an excellent LPN who is also in her mid 60's. And I think the nurse manager of our Outpatient Dept is also in her 60's.

mustlovepoodles, RN

Specializes in OB/GYN, Peds, School Nurse, DD.

I work with 2 nurses in their 60's and 1 nurse in her 70's in LTC. They seem to handle the work well. Some of the residents they have known for years outside of the nursing home. I know that the nurse in her 70's went to school with some of the residents. I think it is kind of nice for both the resident and the nurse.

:nurse: My aunt worked until age 71. She had spent about 30 years in LTC and was the DON for the last 15yrs. She didn't have to work; she could have easily retired at age 62, but she liked being busy and she worried about her residents. They LTC she worked in was very homey and she had known a lot of the residents in their previous lives.

:nurse: My mother worked until age 62, still working nights in L&D. She would have worked longer, but her knees and feet were ruined so she went out on disability. Mother is 76 and she still keeps her license current, "just in case.":D

:nurse: My own job is actually a job share situation. The previous nurse was 65 and had been a school nurse for about 12 years. Between us we had almost 75 years of peds nursing. She decided to retire this fall and we really miss her. She knew everything, has seen or done just about anything, and she never got flustered. Cool and calm all the time. She was a real treasure. The new nurse is about 37 and I'm 54, so I guess now it's my turn to be the "resource" for a younger nurse.

We work with a wonderful late 60's/early 70's ( I wouldn't dare ask her age LOL) nurse in LTC. She more than keeps up !