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Nurses: Remember The Calling?

Nurses Article   (13,683 Views 31 Replies 915 Words)
by pedsnursing pedsnursing (New) New

pedsnursing has 14 years experience and specializes in L/D and Pediatrics.

1 Article; 1,479 Profile Views; 5 Posts

When I wake in the morning, I never know what God has in store for this ole' nurse. As I drive to work, thoughts of what can happen stream through my mind. Will I lose my patience, or will the twelve-hour shift take a toll on me, seven hours in? Will my mind stay clear of my own problems long enough to make critical decisions that affect my patient's life?

Nurses: Remember The Calling?

Will I make a medication error, or will someone not receive the care they deserve because of my patient load. Will I remember the patient at the very end of the hall? Will I meet the needs of my patient, physically and emotionally. Or will I be strong enough to hold a dying child's hand as they slip away? Only to then turn and search for the right words to comfort grief-stricken parents, who are lingering on every word...Searching for a reason...(I never want to relive that again).

This should go through every nurse's mind...Everyday...Am I strong enough to carry the responsibility for another person's life? Am I willing to give of myself to a total stranger? Even if I am treated poorly by them? Who sets the standards of care you give to these strangers? Where is it written that a nurse should give of herself...Unconditionally?

If you agree with the concept that patients receive the quality of care based on the attitude they project to you...And you are a nurse...Go back to nursing 101. I know of a nurse who comes to work every day with a smile on her face. The patients love her. They ask for her by name. Wow, what a difference she makes in a person's life. I was once told that there is more to nursing than just talking or "bonding" with patients. There is more to nursing than saying goodbye at the end of the day...Well, this nurse was almost right. There is more than just talking to your patients or connecting with them...But not much more. I feel this nurse has lost herself in the everyday shuffle of her job. A routine that every patient is treated the same, regardless of the need. A robotic attitude produces a sour nurse. My advice to her is to remember the calling.

When the human touch is the last thing you give a patient...It shows. Taking the human touch out of nursing is nothing short of a nurse who does a job, but a job to be a nurse is a much greater approach. What an honor God gives us...To endure a calling for nursing. As a nurse, can you remember the calling God gave you? Where were you when he called your name to the profession of nursing? What happened in your life that drove you to the honor of becoming a nurse?

Florence Nightingale gave of herself. Born into a rich, upper-class British educator, she one day heard the calling of God's mission for her. Timeless days were common to a single, childless woman. By night, she would carry a lamp to light her path to help care for those in need. With little to no money, a hospital was her home. At times, a blanket of stars is all she had to sleep with. A long white dress with a navy shaw and a white cap was her attire. She traveled many miles, on foot, to help those who needed her. Never thinking of herself, and never complaining, she set standards that all nurses should abide by. "with a human touch, care for those who demonstrate a need."

At times, I get tired. But when I feel I just can't smile another smile, or give one more ounce of myself, I jolt quickly to a mindset that anyone can nurse, however, not everyone was meant to be a nurse. Patients know the difference. At the end of the day, when I say goodbye to my patients, warm hugs and kind words are all I need to justify my care for them. As I walk away, I am always shocked to learn the difference they made in my life that day. What a gift God gives me daily. For a short time in their lives, I was an important part of their family. How blessed am I that God gives me the endurance to withstand the day so I may deliver the Florence Nightingale touch? Although I may not carry a lamp, the light of her mission illuminates from me. Nursing to me is a god giving profession. A profession that can not be substituted by a computer or industrial machines. There is no surrogate for the human heart. No replacement for the human touch. No exchange for the compassion you give. The difference you make as a nurse lasts a lifetime.

As I drive home, the echo from my daily travels with me. I take a small slice of my patients day and try to recapture the care I have given. Every patient touches my heart, in one form or another. Every patient teaches me and molds me to do what God has intended for me to do.

Such importance is the nurse who can make a difference. For every life we touch, blessings will descend. And you hear a voice that sings, "well done." I know the care I give is God's hand lifting me up, guiding me.

When the time comes, and I hang my white cap to rest, I hope to hear the sweet rumble of angels flock away from me and flutter to another, to help guide and even carry her through her day, just as they did me. But, let there be no misunderstanding, my flame will continue to flicker and burn.

For I am, and always will be, a nurse.

1 Article; 1,479 Profile Views; 5 Posts

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49 Posts; 2,532 Profile Views

I did my nursing capstone on Postive Socialization in nursing and this, your message, is the message that young nurses need to hear. I see nurses who do their job, and do it well, however, its the nurse that takes that one moment to touch the hand of her patient and look them in the eyes as they speak to her/him that truly make a lasting impression on the patient. I have learned so much about myself just by being around and talking with my patients. Things I learned that I feel I may not have learned about myself if not in this profession. It is a calling, not just a job. Thank you for sharing.

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29 Posts; 1,507 Profile Views

Thank you for sharing this story. It is a reminder we all need from time to time. I try to smile everyday. No matter how bad things seem, maybe, just maybe, my smile can brighten someone's day. Maybe I can have a positive impact on someone's life.

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525 Posts; 6,432 Profile Views

Patient interaction, making a difference, helping people... are primarily the reasons that I entered nursing school, over 30 years ago. I was "medically retired" 7 years ago-so what I see as the current situation in nursing is through fellow co-workers-and seeing what care family members have experienced. Honestly, I think that Florence must be turning in her grave. Increasingly, it seems that nurse-patient interaction is more and more discouraged. How many nurses remember giving "PM care"? Not only were you giving a quick backrub, settling the pt in for the night, but checking for skin breakdown, mental status, how well pain medicine was working, that safety measures were in place-and just showing the patient that you cared about them by your presence. Increasingly, it seems that "doing the patient- on the computer is more improtant than a few minutes spent at bedside. Could this be part of the reason that we will soon face an overwhelning nursing shortage. There are still many caring concerned nurses..they heeded the call, but they sure didn't factor in all the techno work, which keeps them away from the patients...

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pedsnursing has 14 years experience and specializes in L/D and Pediatrics.

1 Article; 5 Posts; 1,479 Profile Views

Well said my friend. I am quite suprized I haven't seen more of a response.

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14 Posts; 1,798 Profile Views

Thank you so much for this. I, too, am surprised not to see more of a response...but am glad to have happened upon your post. The phrase that spoke most to me was "the honor of being a Nurse". I also don't think it's an accident that you've capitalized our role--that of Nurse. We are able to give so much, even as the work takes a lot out of us many times. Having previously been an oncology chaplain, I always look for the ways in which the work can fundamentally be about connections to people, making a concrete difference in people's lives.

I've heard it said by musicians that we can be technically proficient, but that isn't enough to truly make music. You are making music, and I thank you for the reminder and inspiration. May the force be with you! Thanks again.

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Thank you so very much for your article. I just started nursing school and currently work as a CNA II. The other day was a stressful night, I had a patient that was having seizures, the nurse left and I held the patients hand letting her know that she was not alone. The nurse later told me that I shouldn't go into nursing it is just not worth it. I guess some just don't know what a difference we really can make.

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4 Posts; 1,195 Profile Views

Thanks for posting your comment. I whole heartedly agree with all of your post. I am a fairly new nurse 18months old who started late in life. I walk into every patients room with a smile on my face and treat each one of them, the way I want to be treated if I am ever lying in that bed. My first prayer everyday going to work is that number one God protects each of my patients from me, and that they would only see his light shine through. I work in a very busy ED and frequently with critical patients. I hold a lot of hands, get hugs every shift, and frequently am asked to pray with my patients. God calls us to do many things as nurses - just keep your ears open.

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461 Posts; 8,273 Profile Views

Thanks for posting this..... Nursing is more than just a job.

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S.Corder, RN specializes in Psych/Home health/Med-Surg.

30 Posts; 1,665 Profile Views

I read your terrific message and I did cry. Not because it fits today, because I do not think it does. But it used too. I miss the old days when every word that you wrote was true. Now, my saddness over being a nurse is overwhelming. After 40+ years, maybe I have become jaded. I do not see caring in healthcare anymore. And when you try and give it, you are ridiculed.

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pattywatt specializes in None.

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Thank you, for that touching word. I am 48 years old and I will be going into Nursing. I have a handicapped daughter, she is 30 years old now, that I have been taking care of since the day she was born and now she is in a institution because I could not get the help that she needed when she was at home with me, I was tired of getting the run around from people that I thought is suppose to help, so now that I have a chance to go to school I will go into Nursing. I have an older sister who graduated and passed her boards and she is an LPN (about 4 years ago) and I am proud of her, so I know that if she can do it, so can I and I am looking forward to the ups and downs that go along with this career. I am also reading a book by Florence Nightingale called " Notes on Nursing". I think that this is a good start. God bless all nurses, it is truly a special calling.

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pattywatt specializes in None.

13 Posts; 1,563 Profile Views

A beautiful and well felt message!:nurse:

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