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NP still working as a bedside nurse on the side...

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by LM NY LM NY (Member)

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You are reading page 3 of NP still working as a bedside nurse on the side.... If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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11 hours ago, traumaRUs said:

You are held to the ASSESSMENT skills of an APRN. Believe me. 

So why would any NP work as an RN, when you are required to assess but can't do anything? Sounds like a complete lose/lose proposition.

Sounds like a story behind it, too. I would love to hear.

There are many licensed NPs who work as RNs, for reasons of their own. Possibly thousands. I don't think it's a rare thing.

NPs getting into legal trouble working as RNs?

Sounds to me like an urban legend. I would like to be proven wrong.

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djmatte has 7 years experience as a ADN, MSN, RN, NP and works as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

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8 hours ago, The-DON said:

I worked with them in the ER, however it is a state by state thing. There is the option of obtaining an post grad acute care certificate as well. 

ENP cert would be more appropriate after than ACNP of planning to work in the ed.

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

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12 hours ago, Oldmahubbard said:

So why would any NP work as an RN, when you are required to assess but can't do anything? Sounds like a complete lose/lose proposition.

Sounds like a story behind it, too. I would love to hear.

There are many licensed NPs who work as RNs, for reasons of their own. Possibly thousands. I don't think it's a rare thing.

NPs getting into legal trouble working as RNs?

Sounds to me like an urban legend. I would like to be proven wrong.

lol - yep there is a story behind it. I've been on my rural fire dept for many years and been an APRN for 13.  I am licensed as a pre-hospital RN in IL which is how I run EMS calls. 

Will make this very general but I'm sure you'll understand why I'm doing so. I ran a call with a licensed volunteer paramedic who was first on the scene. I came along a few minutes later and asked what I could do to help. The pt was on a cardiac monitor and I briefly glanced at the monitor as I did some other tasks to get the pt ready for transport. I was called a couple of weeks later by the medical director (an MD) who asked if I had looked at the monitor and I told him what I saw. In the end, there was some confusion over the rhythm and it had been charted something different than what I saw and interpreted......so I wrote an addendum to the chart, signed it and all was well....until a couple of months later when I was contacted again by the medical director to call a lawyer about the call. So, as I was talking to the lawyer and he was asking me some basic background questions, he made the comment that since I was an APRN, I was held to that standard for assessment of the patient. That it all depended on the situation but even if I couldn't "fix" the situation, I had to utilize my knowledge (as an APRN) to assess the pt at that level and if I couldn't do anything about it, I had the duty to report it to someone else who could fix it. So, yes, at least in IL, I am held to the assessment skills of an APRN with like experience. 

 

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