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NP salary/pay let’s be transparent

Posted

Transparency is important so we can negotiate. As a new grad nurse practitioner I accepted a ridiculously low paying position and I assumed that was the pay in the new city I move to. I have grown over the past couple years and I understand I was taken advantage of. I hope that this doesn’t happen to others. Therefore, I believe it is critical we know what other nurse practitioners are being compensated so we are able to negotiate our salary and benefits packages.

I’m an FNP-C in Houston area working in Surgery (first assist, preop, and follow up post op care) Salary is 110k (negotiating to 115k), 3weeks pto, 9 paid holidays, 1500 CME/yr, paid DEA, malpractice, 401k without match, 4 day work week (40-50hrs), on-call practically all the time (but only get calls on surgery days 2-3days/week). Overall I’m happy with the work I do.
 

What is your compensation package look like?

There are infinite threads on wages and benefits which always seem to evolve into location wars. This will not be beneficial to use as a bargaining tool as pay is not consistent across the board due to the cost of living, saturation, and location. It's a good premise, but there are too many moving variables to get a concise, consistent range of wages.

I'm not a NP, but will be there some day.  I appreciate this post.

4 days a week 115k a year as a new grad!?!! 
most will say that’s a good gig 

I mean Great  gig

 

Edited by Ackeem

I do not see any recent post specifically about NP salaries. Anyone can share they’re compensation packages from any state region and we can compare to those in our areas. I haven’t seen any NPs post salaries in my area, hence why I made this post. 

I am not a new grad any longer. I am 3.5 years practicing with this compensation in a Houston suburb. I believe it’s comparable to others in Houston, but I’m certain. I’m originally from San Francisco where NPs are payed significantly higher and cost of living is also significantly higher. 
 

Thanks for sharing

I'm not trying to be facetious. There was a post about this not too long ago and it turned into a location war and people posted salaries. You can do a search of salaries on AN and threads would come up. However, you're more than welcome to keep going in this thread. I just don't see many people posting in it because we've already seen this several times.

umbdude, MSN, NP

Specializes in Psych/Mental Health. Has 4 years experience.

On 9/26/2020 at 9:15 AM, SurgicalNP said:

I do not see any recent post specifically about NP salaries. Anyone can share they’re compensation packages from any state region and we can compare to those in our areas. I haven’t seen any NPs post salaries in my area, hence why I made this post. 

I am not a new grad any longer. I am 3.5 years practicing with this compensation in a Houston suburb. I believe it’s comparable to others in Houston, but I’m certain. I’m originally from San Francisco where NPs are payed significantly higher and cost of living is also significantly higher. 

Thanks for sharing

A recent Reddit post might have some information that you're looking for:

aok7, NP

Has 12 years experience.

I am wondering about the specialty, how are you feeling about surgery in the setting of FNP preparation?

As a new grad in Seattle I earned about $135K including incentive with 4 weeks PTO, $2K education, all license payment, on-call pay about 3-4 days per month, and quite flexible schedule, but for outcomes I worked about 50 hours/week.  Plus a lot of self-study as a new grad LOL.

I actually have quite a pay cut by choice in my current job.  It is my specialty of strength and choice.  Cost of living provides a similar financial outcome, and vacation about the same, which is most important to me.

Edited by aok7

DrCOVID, DNP

Specializes in mental health/medical-surgical. Has 12 years experience.

As someone pointed out, there are a lot of factors that come into play and there are a lot of threads about this here already. Location is huge.

It's way more complex than most of what you see here though; in independent practice, you can negotiate everything. For instance, as a PLLC you can negotiate reimbursement rates. If you have a good relationship with a physician, you don't have to pay that much. You can also choose certain insurances after you build clients that pay more... etc.

TLDR; depending on how hard you advocate for yourself, your salary will be way off the average. I don't know if this applies in something like primary care as there are obvious differences.

Edited by adammRN

MikeFNPC, MSN

Specializes in FNP.

Primary care, 40 hours, 150k after bonus, 5k CME, 150 hours PTO not including about 8 holidays, 5 yrs experience, Texas. Lots of opportunities for OT, but would rather spend time with the family.  

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

On 9/19/2020 at 12:50 PM, SurgicalNP said:

Transparency is important so we can negotiate. As a new grad nurse practitioner I accepted a ridiculously low paying position and I assumed that was the pay in the new city I move to. I have grown over the past couple years and I understand I was taken advantage of. I hope that this doesn’t happen to others. Therefore, I believe it is critical we know what other nurse practitioners are being compensated so we are able to negotiate our salary and benefits packages.

I’m an FNP-C in Houston area working in Surgery (first assist, preop, and follow up post op care) Salary is 110k (negotiating to 115k), 3weeks pto, 9 paid holidays, 1500 CME/yr, paid DEA, malpractice, 401k without match, 4 day work week (40-50hrs), on-call practically all the time (but only get calls on surgery days 2-3days/week). Overall I’m happy with the work I do.

What is your compensation package look like?

I am shocked that an FNP is employed in surgery. 

32 minutes ago, ghillbert said:

I am shocked that an FNP is employed in surgery. 

In addition to receiving formal education for First Assist, I received training from the surgeons. I see preop and post op surgical patients in office. I do know many NPs working in surgery in some aspect ( first assist, post surgical oncology plastics in office, gyn onc surgery etc.)

Also, insurance companies reimburse for my role as first assist.

Edited by SurgicalNP

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

I'm not suggesting you are not competent for your role. I am saying that the FNP is not educationally or clinically prepared to work in an operative environment.

On 10/15/2020 at 9:04 PM, ghillbert said:

I'm not suggesting you are not competent for your role. I am saying that the FNP is not educationally or clinically prepared to work in an operative environment.

On 10/15/2020 at 9:04 PM, ghillbert said:

I'm not suggesting you are not competent for your role. I am saying that the FNP is not educationally or clinically prepared to work in an operative environment.

If she is a first assist , then she would be competent.  I was considering a similar role and would have had to become a first assist. 

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

I didn't suggest otherwise, as my quote that you included says clearly.

myoglobin, ASN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ICU, trauma, neuro. Has 13 years experience.

PMHNP graduated Oct 2019 working in the Seattle area on pace to earn around 250K three days per week seeing patients. No benefits 1099. Also I work from home and see clients only through telemedicine. My SO has been a PMHNP since 2016 and sees Medicaid patients (mostly few Medicare and private pay) in Arizona and earns $85.00/hr no benefits 1099 also working from home.

Edited by myoglobin

jnb1740, BSN

Specializes in Cardiac. Has 25 years experience.

What does PMHNP stand for?  Also, what does SO stand for?  

verene, MSN

Specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

1 hour ago, jnb1740 said:

What does PMHNP stand for?  Also, what does SO stand for?  

PMHNP  - Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

SO - Significant Other