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New NCLEX Passing Standard: April 1, 2007

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Specializes in Gerontological, cardiac, med-surg, peds. Has 16 years experience.

The National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc. (NCSBN) voted at its Dec. 5-7, 2006 meeting to raise the passing standard for the NCLEX-RN examination (the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses). The new passing standard is -0.2100 logits on the NCLEX-RN logistic scale, 0.070 logits higher than the previous standard of -0.2800. The new passing standard will take effect on April 1, 2007, in conjunction with the 2007 NCLEX-RN Test Plan.

After consideration of all available information, the NCSBN Board of Directors determined that safe and effective entry-level RN practice requires a greater level of knowledge, skills, and abilities than was required in 2004, when NCSBN established the current standard. The passing standard was increased in response to changes in U.S. health care delivery and nursing practice that have resulted in the greater acuity of clients seen by entry-level RNs.

https://www.ncsbn.org/1090.htm

ZASHAGALKA, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 15 years experience.

This is what I predicted in Aug:

https://allnurses.com/forums/f8/should-there-limit-trying-pass-nclex-111272-5.html

You might be interested to know that the passing standard for NCLEX-RN has been raised 4 times since it's widespread inception in 1994, from an original passing standard of -0.4766 logits to -0.43 logits in 1997 to -0.35 logits in 2000 to -0.28 logits in 2003. The test is re-evaluated every 3 yrs, so a new passing standard is due by year's end. My guess, based on the data discussed 3 yrs ago, is that the new standard will probably be near -0.26 logits, although if you look at historical tightening of the passing standard, the new standard would be closer to -0.22 logits.

-0.21 is right in line with historical standards. The first tightening of the standards, in 1997 was by almost 0.05 logits. The next one, in 2000, was by 0.08 logits. The last two, 2003, and now, 2006, have been by 0.07 logits. So, over the 13 yrs the CAT has been in existence, the standards have tightened from -0.4766 logits to next April's -0.21 logits.

By the way, a 'logit' simply refers to a common reference point or interval within a model. As a unit of measure, it is only relevant to the model it references. In other words, it's validity for comparison purposes is only within the context of other 'logits', or positions, within the same scale. Imagine a number line, with these values placeholders along the line. In order to pass, your final 'score' (after April) must be to the right of -0.21 logits on this number line. (Currently, the number is at -0.28 logits)

Keep in mind that there are over 10,000 questions to NCLEX (even if you get 265 questions, that only represents a small fraction of the total question pool). Each question occupies a place of difficulty along this 'line'; each question is assigned a placekeeping position; a logit. The computer is not determining how many questions you get right or wrong, but it is predicting at WHICH point in difficulty of question you are equally likely to get a right or wrong answer. Once it determines that with sufficient accuracy, the 'logit' number of that question becomes your 'score'. IF it is greater than -0.21 logits, you pass. If not, you fail. UNDERSTAND that at issue isn't how many questions you get right or wrong, but the DIFFICULTY of the question at which the computer determines you are equally likely to get a right or wrong answer. As such, you will answer about half the questions right; and half wrong: by design. The test gets more difficult until this is exactly the case. It is that increasing level of difficulty that the test is measuring and NOT your number of right or wrong answers.

~faith,

Timothy.

that willbe great for the nursing shortage. so glad I am done with it!

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg.

Just glad I'm done with it already!

ZASHAGALKA, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 15 years experience.

It is simply an acknowledgment that, as nursing becomes more advanced, the skills for minimum proficiency become more advanced, as well.

It says nothing about 'relative difficulty' per se, in that your programs should be TEACHING more advanced practice, as well.

For example, high school level biology today include concepts that far surpass masters level biology of even 20 yrs ago.

It's not the TEST per se that is changing, but nursing. The test simply reflects that fact.

In fact, through 4 different previous difficulty levels, the % of first time passers have remained consistent, at about 87%. So, if you are going to take this test after April, don't sweat this change.

~faith,

Timothy.

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg.

It is simply an acknowledgment that, as nursing becomes more advanced, the skills for minimum proficiency become more advanced, as well.

It says nothing about 'relative difficulty' per se, in that your programs should be TEACHING more advanced practice, as well.

For example, high school level biology today include concepts that far surpass masters level biology of even 20 yrs ago.

It's not the TEST per se that is changing, but nursing. The test simply reflects that fact.

In fact, through 4 different previous difficulty levels, the % of first times passers have remained consistent, at about 87%. So, if you are going to take this test after April, don't sweat this change.

~faith,

Timothy.

Absolutely right! I would think that the vast majority of you are safely over this level anyway already! Well 87% of you anyway:chuckle!

It still makes no change to the way that you should prepare for the exam.....and look at the decimal point, where it is. You will not see much of a diference, the ones that are going to pass, will continue to be the ones to pass, and the ones that could not, will continue the same.

Preparation still stays the same, as it has all along.

this is apply for NY also or it is only for Chicago?

dijaqrn

Specializes in OR, MS, Neuro, UC.

The NCLEX is a national exam, it's the same in all states.

I guess I had better take better notes in the RN program, to prepare for the NCLEX-RN. I have already installed 2 of the disks from the study guides, and plan to use them when I start the RN program in Jan.

Dabuggy

oh my.. i hope i can take the nclex soon! just passed cgfns last nov2006 and im still waiting for my toefl results... hopefully i can have my cgfns certificate so i can take the nclex.

hi. study guides? where'd you get these?

If you want to own them go to websites like half.com and type in NCLEX. if your going for the PN don't get the RN. You can also type in NCLEX made easy. They sell books for everything. I bought Patho made easy for my patho class. It helped me. But my school library is linked to all the libraries in my state. I can order the book and use it that way. It may even come with a CD that I can downlowd and keep on my comp.

Dabuggy

ZASHAGALKA, RN

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 15 years experience.

Let me repeat this, because I clarified it:

By the way, a 'logit' simply refers to a common reference point or interval within a model. As a unit of measure, it is only relevant to the model it references. In other words, it's validity for comparison purposes is only within the context of other 'logits', or positions, within the same scale. Imagine a number line, with these values placeholders along the line. In order to pass, your final 'score' (after April) must be to the right of -0.21 logits on this number line. (Currently, the number is at -0.28 logits)

Keep in mind that there are over 10,000 questions to NCLEX (even if you get 265 questions, that only represents a small fraction of the total question pool). Each question occupies a place of difficulty along this 'line'; each question is assigned a placekeeping position; a logit. The computer is not determining how many questions you get right or wrong, but it is predicting at WHICH point in difficulty of question you are equally likely to get a right or wrong answer. Once it determines that with sufficient accuracy, the 'logit' number of that question becomes your 'score'. IF it is greater than -0.21 logits, you pass. If not, you fail. UNDERSTAND that at issue isn't how many questions you get right or wrong, but the DIFFICULTY of the question at which the computer determines you are equally likely to get a right or wrong answer. As such, you will answer about half the questions right; and half wrong: by design. The test gets more difficult until this is exactly the case. It is that increasing level of difficulty that the test is measuring and NOT your number of right or wrong answers.

~faith,

Timothy.

Every correct question you answer increases the difficulty of the NEXT question. Every incorrect answer reduces the difficulty of the next question. This continues until the gap between the difficulty of right or wrong answers narrows to a single point. At THAT point, the test measures your 'score', expressed as a logit value of that single point or question.

If your 'score' is greater than -0.28 logits (-0.21 logits in April of next year), you pass.

NCLEX is considered a difficult exam because, unlike every other test you have ever taken, you aren't being measured against your peers. You are, in fact, being measured against yourself.

~faith,

Timothy.

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