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New grad. Torn between two..ER or med/surg?

I got offered two jobs in the ER and medsurg at the same hospital. I fell in love with ER when i was assigned there twice, the only thing that is holding me back are the "horror stories" of new grad ER nurses and this lowered my confidence about myself as a new grad. I want to keep my license safe. On the other hand, I like medsurg but not love i had a lot of clinical days as a student on this floor. Am also familiar with their computer program they use which is different from the ER. Any advice? Our er has a 6month program

PacoUSA, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCU / Telemetry.

If your ER has a comprehensive orientation designed for new grads, I say go that route. I personally would no longer recommend doing med surg to start unless it's what you really want to specialize in. Med surg ratios are too damn high everywhere you go - working at stepdown acuity without critical care training. If I had to do it all over again I'd start in critical care. I just wasn't confident enough out of nursing school to do it. Now I am and trying to make that transition.

PA_RN87, MSN, RN, APRN

Specializes in Medical-Oncology, Nursing Education, Family Med.

Meg surg may kill your spirits, unless it's where you really want to be. I say go ER.

OldDude

Specializes in Pediatrics.

GO WITH THE ER....you'll learn everything you need to know from the department. Plus you'll gain the critical thinking skills and confidence to transfer to any department afterward, if you want to...wouldn't work like that, in reverse for instance, if you started in med-surg (yuch).

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

It sounds like the ER has a strong orientation program for new grads. Double-check that it does -- and that its retention rate of new grads is good. You can directly ask questions such as:

1. How many new grads do you typically hire each year?

2. How many of those new grads complete the entire orientation program?

3. How many are still working in the ER at 1 year?

Since your interview is already over, it might seem awkward to ask those questions now, but it can be done. Since they have already offered you a job, you have some room to maneuver here. Call and say that you are still very interested in the ER job, but that friends have advised you to ask a few questions about whether or not previously-hired new grads have been successful. That's a reasonable question to ask ... and if their answer is that most of the new grads they have hired in the ER have been successful, then take the ER job. If that's not the case, ask what they are doing to change that.

Thank you all for your input! I will update asap which job im taking.

Larry3373

Specializes in Critical Care; Recovery.

No question go with ER now. I'm have 3 years experience, but ER usually want some ER experience and that is making it difficult for me to transition to the ER.

Nonyvole, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency.

ER. Go ER. Especially if they have a solid orientation set up for new grads.

I started out in the ER as a new grad nurse and haven't regretted it yet.

I got offered two jobs in the ER and medsurg at the same hospital. I fell in love with ER when i was assigned there twice, the only thing that is holding me back are the "horror stories" of new grad ER nurses and this lowered my confidence about myself as a new grad. I want to keep my license safe. On the other hand, I like medsurg but not love i had a lot of clinical days as a student on this floor. Am also familiar with their computer program they use which is different from the ER. Any advice? Our er has a 6month program

I usually don't like telling people exactly what to do but go with the ER....especially since you actually enjoyed it. Most "new grad" anywhere will have their horror stories. If you enjoyed it, go for it. Don't even entertain the idea of Med-Surg because just like OldDude alluded to, it is quite difficult to transfer to another department from Med-Surg (besides another Med-Surg department) unless its done "internally" (within the same facility) and that isnt always a guarantee. Get your foot into the ER, if you decide its not for you after all, then at least you will have other options available to you based on your (ER) experience.

JustaGypsy

Specializes in ER, SANE, Home Health, Forensic.

I also started out in ER. Solid advice on here from all.

turnforthenurse, MSN, NP

Specializes in ER, progressive care.

I feel like new grads should stay out the ER and gain experience elsewhere first...UNLESS your ER offers an extensive new grad program/internship. My hospital only offers about 12 weeks of orientation and then you're cut loose. Personally that is not enough time for someone starting out in the ER.

emtb2rn, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency.

I feel like new grads should stay out the ER and gain experience elsewhere [snip] My hospital only offers about 12 weeks of orientation and then you're cut loose. Personally that is not enough time for someone starting out in the ER.

But that's you. Others, including myself, find 12-14 weeks sufficient. The only way you get ED experience is in the ED.

ER as sugested above, hopefully they have a good orientation program. My hospital has 14-17 weeks for new grads.. take advantage of that they have..

EmergencyRNBSN

Specializes in Emergency.

I started out in ER as well and all the advice has been good thus far. All depends on what you get out of orientation and whether or not you have a good preceptor, IMO.

You are taught what you need to know at the end of the day. While yes, med surge does give you a good foundation of what it means to "be a nurse" with passing meds, assessments, talking to physicians, I do not think that a lot of translates well to an ER environment anyway.

I graduated in Dec and was hired into our level 1 trauma center ED. We have a nurse residency program that includes a 6 month orientation to the department. The department makes sure we're ready before we work on our own. I can't imagine being anywhere else!

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