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Miles on my car

anne_marie_oregon specializes in Nursing.

Do you ever stress about the miles you are putting on your car while working?

This seems to be stressing me out lately! I am trying to group my patients by area, but it just doesn't always work out that way.

pmabraham specializes in Hospice, Palliative Care.

Hi Anne:

Sometimes I consider getting a more economical car (EV, PHEV, or hybrid), but I don't fret the miles. Stressing about what we cannot control doesn't help. BTW, somedays I only drive 40 miles, and other days well over 300. A coworker had a 350 mile day a short while back.

Thank you.

I worked home health for about 5 years, up until a year ago. I live in rural Texas and averaged 75-150 miles per day. At first I drove a Dodge diesel pickup, then got a mid-size SUV. The truck was actually better on fuel mileage and made it much easier to go down gravel roads and through pastures! I actually got stuck in my SUV when going to a VERY rural location that had a muddy, black gumbo "trail" that was about 5 miles long.

I did worry a bit about the car it then realized it was just part of Home Health.

I bought a brand new car and then was dropped into a rural area due to staff shortages. I have put on almost 10K miles in less than 3 months. On one of my trips over a very bad road I took a hard to see dip at too high a speed. 3500$ in damage to the underside of my beautiful car.

I justify it this way. - With the hourly travel pay and mileage compensation, I earn my monthly car payment in just over 2 weeks. I think of the bright shiny thing as a tool - a tool I use to do a job I love.

As the previous poster said, it is just part of Home Health.

My mileage varied over the years but as a career home health nurse, I agree with above poster about seeing your car as a tool.

I've always driven modestly priced fairly efficient cars for work (18K price range, 25-30 miles/gal) with warranties based on years, not mileage.

I always bought new and turned over about every 4 yrs for the reliability.

With an average of a $350 car payment and reimbursement at $500-600 monthly, it was a wash.

Tip: live by the office or in your patient territory for min miles and/or max mileage reimbursement as well as job satisfaction.

Here's an idea. Take the money you get for mileage and put it in the separate savings account for car expenses and a down payment for a new car when you need it.

Sometimes I just rent a car, when my car is in the service. I'm actually thinking of selling it right now. I'm always searching for the most cheap prices, services for renting a car are essential for me.

The agency I did visits for did not pay mileage. They said that $5 of the per visit rate was their set fee for mileage. That was $5 toward a per visit rate that was still substantially below what other agencies offered. It did not take me long to figure out that they were blessing me with the far away cases that other nurses refused to do, for a reason. I even had to ask around to get money to put gas in my car. After some time trying to be a good employee, I just gave up and told them I could no longer afford to do it.

On 6/3/2019 at 2:17 PM, caliotter3 said:

The agency I did visits for did not pay mileage. They said that $5 of the per visit rate was their set fee for mileage. That was $5 toward a per visit rate that was still substantially below what other agencies offered. It did not take me long to figure out that they were blessing me with the far away cases that other nurses refused to do, for a reason. I even had to ask around to get money to put gas in my car. After some time trying to be a good employee, I just gave up and told them I could no longer afford to do it.

It sounds like you voted with your feet. That was an unacceptable arrangement. Good for you for leaving.

I felt just the opposite. Here I am on a beautiful spring day, and somebody is actually paying me to drive around.

Don't blow your mileage check, it isn't extra money.

traumaRUs specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

I've been driving 100-200 miles per day for 13+ years now. I average 60k miles per year on my vehicle. I have had 4 subarus and love, love, love them. They don't get stuck in snow (well unless I'm an idiot), they are good on ice, comfortable and my newest one, 2018 Outback averages 31mpg.

I get the federal mileage rate but Illinois just instituted a huge gas tax which will place it at $0.38 per gallon so am unsure what we will do at that point:

https://www.illinoispolicy.org/illinoisans-will-see-state-gas-tax-double-starting-july-1/

The federal rate is $0.58 per mile so will need to do some negotiating for sure.

https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/irs-issues-standard-mileage-rates-for-2019

kat7464 specializes in Hospice, home health, LTC.

Are you in this position for your patients or your car? Because your car will definitely take a beating. They are replaceable (at a price, of course). But you have a heart for hospice and know the lives of your patients and what they are struggling with is worth the toll on your car. Otherwise, you probaby would not have taken the job. I am thankful for my Subaru...so thankful, but she is feeling the miles.

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